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July 26, 1942 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-07-26

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PAGE TWO;

THE MICHIG~AN D ATV. . LUJ Z L ..Y

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SumSmerPromToaBedHedIAugust29S"edIAtJack
JACKSON, July 25 -(A- Acting the American Federation of Stat

Ste n dfl' iypewrtErs
ce. Called In By Nelson

N ine Cam pus the chance to attend a big dance,
'L U U either formal or informal, and to
Groups Behind hear oneof the nation'stbest bands.
J This is the first time that sucha
project has been attempted during
g s Deice summer session.
According to Don West, president
Proceeds Will Be Shared of the Union and general chairman
B Bomber. of Summer Prom, late hours for
BYB Schlarship, women may possibly be secured for
Russian, CRina Reliefs that night. This dance is approved
by the Student War Board.
By:BARBARA DE FRIES The central committee for Sum-
mer Prom, having complete charge
Nne leading campus organizations of the plans and arrangements, will
and several Ann Arbor groups are be made up of members of the follow-
cooperating on plans for the Summer ing organizations: Michigan League,
Prom, the season's only big dance, Michigan Union, Russian War Relief,
which will be held 9 p.m. to midnight, Interfraternity Council, United China
Relief, Student Senate,. Alpha Phi
Friday August 21. Omega, Bomber Scholarship Com-
The first dance of its kind to be mittee and The Daily.
presented on Michigan's summer
campus, the Summer Prom will take
over the hall of the Sports Building Graduates To Hold
and will bring to Ann Arbor a big
name band. The dance will be option- Speech Symposium
al to dancers who may come formal,
semi-formal or informal and will be
open to students of the Summer The various aspects of practical
Term, Summer Session and towns- theatre work will be discussed at a
people. graduate speech symposium at 4 p.m.
While a band has not been con- tomorrow in the East Conference
tracted yet, the committee, composed Room of the Rackham Building.
of .heads of campus organizations, Participating in the program will
has promised one of the currently Prof.iatine B. Windtrof the
top-rating orchestras. be prof.'Valentine B. Windt of the
Proceeds from the ticket sale will speech department, Prof. Claribel
f go to the Bomber Scholarship, Rus- Baird of Oklahoma College for Wo-
sian War Relief and United China men; Lucy Barton of Karinska's
Relief. Distribution of proceeds school of costume design; Howard
among the three groups will be de- Bay, Broadway stage designer;
cided upon by the central committee. Nancy Bowman, director of dramat-
Representatives from each of the ics at Mount Clemens High School;
funds are serving on the dance com- and Charles H. Meredith, director of
mittee. Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre at
In addition to supporting the char- New Orleans.
ity groups, the Summer Prom will A question period will follow the
give all students and townspeople formal discussion.
Sunday at the Wolverine
209 SOUTH STATE
Soup Consomme with Vegetables
Chilled Tomato or Grapefruit Juice
Radishes - Pickles - Olives
ROAST YOUNG CHICKEN, stuffed, Cranberry Sauce
GRILLED BEEF TENDERLOIN STEAK
Whipped Potatoes or French Fried Potatoes
New Green Beans or Glazed Carrots
Fresh Vegetable Salad or Fruit Salad
Hot Rolls and Butter
Tea - Coffee - Milk - Iced Tea
Ice Cream
Guest Price 55c

on orders of Governor Van Wagoner
in an attempt to avert a threatened

County and Municipal employes
(AFL).

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I ~QVIE_-R-VIEWS_

shutdown of Jackson
Thomas J. Donahuet hL
State Labor Mediation
gaged in separate cont
today with city oIci
representatives of 115 s
cipal employes.

war plants. A labor "holiday" effective at mid-
ainman of. tlt night tomorrow, affecting all AFI
unionists in the city, unless settle
ment of the strike is made. was
fcrences here ti neatened yesterday in a telegram
als and with sent by the local United Automobile
triking mum- Workers tAFL) council to Chairman
William H. Davis of the War Labor
members of Board.

4t The State. .
Red Skelton's corkscrew pan, the
twinkling tapping toes of Eleanor
Powell and buzzsaw-voiced Bert Lahr
will hit the State Theatre today in
MGM's nuttily nautical musical,
"Ship Ahoy."
To the tunes of Tommy Dorsey and
his orchestra, a boatload of assorted
funsters, romancers and screwballs
take a musical cruise to thettropics
on a wave of seven swing hits.
Dorsey and his band feature "Last
Call for Love," "Poor You" and "I'll
Take Tallulah" in this picture, while
Red Skelton and his "I dood it" pro-
vide comedy highlights. Virginia
O'Brien joins her less sedate col-
leagues in this two-hour film riot.
"Ship Ahoy," to be shown at the
State until August 1, has been di-
rected by- Edward Buzzell. Jack
Cummings produced this seagoing
epic of three men and a boatload of
girls while Harry Clark was responsi-
ble for the script.
Intricacies of the plot are spun
around the attempts of writer Mer-
ton K. Kibble to get away from the
nerve-shattering deeds of his mental
offspring. Kibble, butcheringly por-
trayed by Red Skelton, winds up
chasing a dance troupe to Cuba in his
attempted relaxation.
In addition to her dancing duties,
Miss Powell plays the role of Tallu-
lah Winters, star of the troupe, who
thinks she is carrying a military
secret for the U.S. Within her .packed
scanties however, there lies a mag-
netic mine which agents of a not-to-
be-mentioned power planted on her.
If you want to know how MGM
managed to get a crew of chorus
girls, two comedians and a magnetic
mine into one picture, go to the
State. The doublecrossing press
agents wouldn't tell us.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
FOR SALE
REMINGTON No. 5-Portable type-
writer. A-1 condition. George
Wells, 514 Monroe St., 7902. 20
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: 3-room furnished apart-
ment. kitchen and dinette, living,
bedroom. Separate entrance. 2309
Plymouth Rd. 22c
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Married couple to act as
cook and porter for fraternity. In-
terested parties call 2-1682 after
7:00 p.m.
BOARD JOB, steady work for steady
student, now and fall term. 523
Packard. Phone 2-2320. 21
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Tan gabardine jacket in vi-
cinity of South Ferry Field Thurs-
day. Reward. Finder call 2-2565.
GREEN PARKER PEN lost on or
near campus Wednesday afternoon.
Pen initialed J.P.H. Reward. Call
2-5561.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
BEAUTY SHOPS
LADIES- Is your hair shocked from
sun, wind, dust, wave setting lo-
tions, harsh dyes, bleaching, or just
neglect? Our professional operators
stand ready to serve you and make
your hair the lovely crowning glory
all people admire. We specialize in
Parker Herbex Treatments. Call
9616. Bluebird Beauty Shoppe.
5 Nickels Arcade. Open Thursday
apd Friday evenings for your con-
venience.

At The Michigan ...
Opening a four-day run today, "The
Male Animal," will be shown at the
usual hours and in the fine style for
which the Michigan Theatre project-
ing machines are so justly famous.
Press releases for the film inform
the reader that the setting is a "typi-
cal midwestern university with en-
thusiastic scholars and equally en-
thusiastic alumni," a phrase whose
peppy professionalism shouldn't dis-
courage potential customers if they
keep reminding themselves that the
play from which the production was
taken was written by James Thurber,
easily the funniest man in America,
The general idea of the story is a
little something about a professor
whose sense of right and wrong gets
him into rather thick trouble with
the administration of the university.
The fact that his wife is becoming
rather chummy with an old class-
mate and ex-football hero, and that
the latter seems likely to move in,
as it were, for the duration doesn't
exactly make him the Cheery Soul
Around the Old Homestead.
To quote further the lucid prose of
the press releases, "The situations be-
come more breezy, and humorously
involved as the picture progresses,
building up to a climax that is sure
to have you howling with laughter."
oor a change, we can believe the
press releases. Thurber's in the back-
ground somewhere, and the picture
is good.
Inter-Racial Group
Will Conduct Panel
MeetingWednesday
A panel on "Why Fight Racial
Discrimination Now" will head the
program of the next to last summer
meeting of the Inter-Racial Asso-
ciation at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the
Union.
Prof. Richard Fuller of the sociol-
ogy department will chair the group,
leading a discussion on the reasons
for an immediate campaign against
discrimination, the means to fight
it, and the effects of such an effort
upon post-war reconstruction.
Other members of the panel are
Charles R. A. Smith, formerly with
the district attorney's office in De-
troit, member of the Catholic Inter-
Racial Congress, and now a petty
officer in the Navy; Gloster Current,
secretary of the National Associa-
tion for Advancement of Colored
People, and Richard Haikkenen,
steward in the UAW-CIO, Packard
local 190.

The

strikers are

U

TDAY!
(Guest Night
Monday)

Amok
y

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S

OPENING WEDNESDAY NIGHT
The Department of Speech presents
Michigan Repertory Players in
to
A new play by FRITZ ROTTER and ALLEN VINCENT.
Listed by Burns Mantle among ten best of the year.
WEDNESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY at 8:30 P.M.
Ticket Prices: 88c - 66c - 44c (including federal tax)
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Box Office Phone 6300

KALTENBORN EDITS THE NEWSa C O
Maj. Geo. Fielding Elliot, Guest Analyst

U. S. WAR STAMPS AND BONDS ON SALE HERE! DAY OR NIGHT!
Starts
TODAY!
Shows at
1 -3-5-7-9 P.M . . ' I --.- ' -- _

,

i' L'GV" V/ 1 M ...V .V (I V" Y V' i 1 wi/ V' Y 1 /

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SERVICE EDITION

*

VOL. 1. No. 5
tack while driving from
Ann Arbor to Detroit . . .
The Navy announced this
week that Aviation Cadet
Reginald P. Aldrich of
Grand Rapids was killed
in a plane crash near
Jacksonville, Fla. . . . Al-
drich was due to graduate
last June but left school
to join the Navy . . . he
was a member of Beta
Theta Pi and participated
in the 1940 Union Opera . .
. ..Richard Gauss, a 15-
year-old Ann Arbor boy,
was killed by lightning
this week while caddying
for his first day at Barton
Hills Golf Course.
Pi Tau Pi Sigma, hon-
nrarv signal corns frater-

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

JULY 26, 1942

rine Corps, w.which will
eliminate present competi-
tive bidding for college
students, are now under
consideration by the War
Board . . . the program,
promulgated in Washing-
ton, will probably begin
with the fall term . . .
Lewis Corey, the author
and lecturer, was in town
Saturday . . . In Washing-
ton, John F. Blandford,
director of the National
Housing Authority, has
promised that a cur -
tailed "Bomber City" hous-
ing plan would move
ahead without delay . . .
the development, origin-
ally planned for more
than 50.000 residents. has

cation and in part designer
of the new physical condi-
tioning program, died of a
heart attack as he led
PEMers through their tri-
weekly calesthenics drill.
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe,
head of the health service,
reported that Dr. Town-
sley, who. was to become
director of the physical ed-
ucation department in the
fall, knew of his condition,
but insisted on continuing
unceasing activity without
which he did not wish to
live.
He died, unfortunately,
before his work had re-
ceived any large financial
reward - despite national
acclaim - and his wife.

lie exhibition in the country
of its kind.
Nine Wins ...
Michigan's baseball team
also won another game as
it added to its summer vic-
tory record. The nine beat
Blissfield 10-2 behind the
fine pitching of Dick Red-
inger, but the principal
motive power was the 15-
hit barrage unleashed by
the hit-hungry Wolverines.
The boys are now look-
ing forward with glee to a
battle with the State St.
All-Stars, made up mostly
of old Michigan stars under
the direction of Russ
O'brien . . . Among those
performing for the street
corner ladsaee x v.Wome-

W -rwolh lk > r..~

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