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July 18, 1941 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1941-07-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MrCH'IGAN 'DAILY

Here Are
Your Draft
Numbers
(Continued from Page 1)

Exit From America For Axis

Agents.

629; 411, 483; 412, 231; 413, 308;
57; 415, 691; 416, 620; 417, 133;
253; 419, 129; 420, 170; 421, 196;
.779; 423, 90; 424, 465; 425, 742.

414,1
418,
422,'
429,
433,
437,
441,

No. 426, 752; 427, 70; 428,
272; 430, 198; 431, 493; 432,
643; 434, 628; 435, 495; 436,
188; 438, 126; 439, 107; 440,
39; 442, 428; 443, 225; 444,
85; 446, 738; 447, 221; 448,!
720; 450, 59.
No. 451, 3; 452, 490; 453,
120; 455, 139; 456, 326; 457,
337; 459, 143; 460, 148; 461,
47; 463, 499; 464, 788; 465,;
445; 467, 501; 468, 327; 469,
451; 471, 510; 472, 197; 473,
343; 475, 409.
No. 476, 171; 477, 366;4
479, 185; 480, 395; 481, 761;
483, 422; 484, 705; 485, 389;
487, 537; 488, 684; 489, 201;
481, 635; 492, 531; 493, 82;4
495, 494; 496, 791; 497, 710;
499, 700; 500, 533.
501, 254; 502, 173; 503, 2
408; 505, 479; 506, 23; 507,7
463; 509, 695; 510, 641; 511,
486; 513, 625; 514, 541; 515,
349; 517, 317; 518, 157; 519,
397; 521, 167; 522, 352 523,
460; 525, 682.
No. 526, 123; 527, 396; 5
529, 639; 530, 728; 531, 497;
533, 177; 534, 658; 535, 275;
537, 316; 538, 679; 539, 621;f
541, 88; 542, 615; 543, 454;5
545, 165; 546, 624; 547, 404;
549, 715; 550, 671.

403;
614;
661;
249;

632; 445,
528; 449,

Three McKay
Jurors Speak
Give Federal Grand Jury
restimony On Trial
DETROIT, July 17.-(,P)-A Fed-
eral grand jury investigating charges
that "something was wrong" with the
jury that tried Republican Commit-
teeman Frank D. McKay and 11 co-
defendants heard testimony today
from three of the trial jurors.
The principal witness was Anton
Maslan, former Detroit waiter, who
first made the charges that led to
the grand jury inquiry. The others
were Fred E. Benz, retired An Arbor
merchant, and George S. Campbell
of Trenton.
All three were reported to have
voted for conviction. The trial jury
was discharged last Saturday after
five days' deliberation. At that time
seven were said to have held out for
conviction and five for acquittal.
United States Attorney John C.
Lehr, who is conducting the investi-
gation, said two jurors who were dis-
charged and a group of newspaper-
men would be summoned to testify to-
morrow.
The jurors are Mrs. Grace S. Cham-
berso f Detroit, who was excused
June 30 by Federal Judge Arthur F.
Lederle because of illness, and Frank
L. Williams, Detroit, an alternate
juror who was discharged before de-
liberations began.

Congress Is Asked To Declare
lUn limited National Emergency'

458;
329;
210;
229;
259;
548;
478,
482,
486,
490,+
494'
498,
251;
183;
261;
509;
474;
717;
528,
532,
536,
540,
544,
548,

454,
458,
462,
466,
470,
474,
387;
305;
122;
616;
110;
236;
504,
508,
512,
516,
520,
524,
362;
755;
667;
769;
774;
180;
554,
558,
562,
566,
570,
574,

WASHINGTON, July 17.-4A)-Ap-
pealing to Congress to declare an un-
limited national emergency before
Aug. 1, General George C. Marshall,
the Chief of Staff, said today Spain,
Portugal and Africa might become the
next target of Axis aggression.
"Each move," he added. "leaves the
Axis forces more and more ready for
another move."
Under such a declaration, draftees,
national guardsmen and reserves
could be retained in the service be-
yond the year of training for which
they were originally inducted. If
they are released after a year, Mar-
shall said, it will be a "tragic error"
which will increase the danger of in-
volvement in war. The Army will be
"running around in circles" trying to
defend the country, he said.
As Marshall testified before the
Senate Military Committee there were
these other developments on the de-
fense front:
House Approves Bill
Legislation authorizing a $585,000,-
000 program of additional shipbuild-
ing, ship repair and naval ordnance
facilities was approved by the House
and sent to the Senate.
Leon Henderson, the price control
administrator, told a House commit-
tee investigating labor migrations that
rent control would be necessary in

certain areas where defense work is
concentrated unless rent increases are
limited voluntarily.
Defense officials said a new pro-
gram for a substantial increase in
tan~k production was being drawn urn
at OPM. Funds were included, they
said, in appropriations recently re-
quested of Congress by President
Roosevelt.
The OPM announced rifles and sub-
machine guns are being turned out
at a rate of more than 1.500 a day.
Army Changes May Continue
Robert P. Patterson, the Under-
secretary of War, announced more
changes in the high command of
the Army were in prospect,.following
the drastic shakeup yesterday.
The Navy said keels were laid at
the rate of a ship a day in the 40
days ending July 10. Twenty-two
ships were lanuched in that time.
The Power Commission, trying to
torEstall a power shortage, called for
an intensifying of coniservation ef-
forts in the southeastern section of
the country.

Laden with several hundred Italian and German nationals, the armed Navy transport West Point left its
pier at New York-bound for Lisbon. Most of the passengers were Axis consular officials and their families
ordered to return home by the United States State Department.
e
Latin American Defense Problem
Called Economic 'One ByvProf. Aioton

III

HORSES

No. 551, 66; 552, 626; 553, 413;
161; 555, 91; 556, 252; 557, 314;
194; 559, 608; 560, 274; 561, 13;
289; 563, 780; 564, 115; 565, 358;
279; 567, 637; 568, 611; 569, 371;
142; 571, 30; 572, 648; 573, 596;1
124; 575, 84.

By MALCOLM HUNGER
Since military defense of South
America by the United States is an
insuperable task, our problem of de-
fending Latin America is largely eco-
nomic, that is, one of giving them a
favorable trade balance and offering
them loans which we don't expect to
get back in order to compensate for
the loss of 50 per cent of their Euro-
pean trade due to the war, Prof.
Ai tbur S. Aiton' of the history de-
partment said in commenting upon
inter-American defense cooperation.
Aosolute isolation of the Western
Hemisphere is impossible, Professor
Aiton declared, and in view of this, he
explained, it has been the policy of
the United States to alleviate the
curtailed European trade in South
America by making emergency pur-
chases and loans. These, however,
are purely emergency measures, he
emphasized, for most of our vital
products, he showed, come from the
Far East.
Already Lending Money
We are already lending thousands
of dollars to finance South American
exchange, Professor Aiton said, and,
he added, it is significant to note
that last year we bought more goods
from Argentina than they purchased

No. 576, 467; 577, 659; 578, 72; 579,
131; 580, 526; 581, 471; 582, 241; 583,
181; 584, 746; 585, 127; 586, 562; 587,
644; 588, 748; 589, 28; 590, 270; 591,
345; 592, 407; 593, 71; 594, 491; 595,
79; 596, 546; 597, 37; 598, 732; 599,
191; 600, 436.
No. 601, 426; 602, 67; 603, 552; 604,
585; 605, 276; 606, 11; 607, 216; 608,
432; 609,,99; 610, 515; 611, 459; 612,
787; 613, 63; 614, 559; 615, 462; 616,
406; 617, 250; 618, 558; 619, 262; 620,
296; 621, 776; 622, 169; 623, 589; 624,
232; 625, 147.
No. 626, 346; 627, 347; 628, 31; 629,
128; 630, 800; 631, 118; 632, 609; 633,
209; 634, 369; 635, 104; 636, 664; 637,
423; 638, 617; 639, 381; 640, 282; 641,
334; 642, 204; 643, 307; 644, 318; 645,
8; 646, 26; 647, 325; 648, 484; 649,
627; 650, 263.
No. 651, 476; 652, 630; 653, 782;
654, 24; 655, 785; 656, 424; 657, 734;
658, 55; 659, 164; 660, 340; 661, 453;
662, 117; 663, 391; 664, 43; 665, 344;
666, 666; 667, 73; 6688, 749; 669, 680;
670, 504; 671, 103; 672, 394; 673, 36;
674; 555; 675, 163.
No. 676, 612; 677, 507; 678, 702;
679, 631; 680, 683; 681, 357; 682, 754;
683, 569; 684, 380; 685, 488; 686, 268;
687, 238; 688, 543; 689, 565; 690, 473;
691, 604; 692, 285; 693, 293; 694, 498;
695, 24; 696, 301; 697, 377; 698, 87;
699, 361; 700, 45.
No. 701, 571; 702, 294; 703, 227;
704, 206; '705, 42; 706, 716; 707, 750;
708, 223; 709, 218; 710, 284; 711, 186;
712, 676; 713, 354; 714, 647; 715, 797;
716, 44;;717, 96; 718, 535; 19, 756; 720,
799; 721, 304; 722, 597; 723, 766;
24, 793; 725, 549.
No. 726, 242; 727, 721; 728, 109;
729, 673; 730, 544; 731, 35; 732, 53;
733, 119; 734, 434; 735, 511; 736, 725;
737, 607; 738, 480; 739, 675; 740, 6;
741, 178; 742, 582; 743, 271; 744, 594;
745, 427; 746, 25; 747, 577; 748, 516;
749, 95; 750, 299.
No. 751, 51; 752, 798; 753, 792; 754,
320; 755, 613; 756, 496; 757, 176; 758
435; 759, 27; 760, 758; 761, 444; 762,
452; 763, 653; 764, 280; 765, 286; 766,
440; 767, 273; 768, 213; 769, 669; 770,
619; 771, 450; 772, 15; 773, 651; 774,

Elmer Riddle
Is Sensational
-But Obscure
NEW YORK, July 17.-(JP)-This
time a year ago, when the Cincinnati
Reds were sailing along to their sec-
ond straight National League pen-
nant, Elmer Riddle would have been
a baseball sensation.
But Elmer was a year late. The
Reds have fallen apart so completely
that Manager Bill McKechnie has
been kept busy dodging the pieces.
And so Elmer's feat of winning 10
straight games, the last two by shut-
outs, has passed virtually unnoticed.
Yes, there really is an Elmer Rid-
dle. He is a tall, blue-eyed, square-
jawed young fellow out of Columbus,
Ga. He admits modestly that he
owns 10 victories without a loss, and
says "I guess I'll do all right if my
luck holds out."
Elmer joined the Reds late in the
1939 season after serving hitches at
Birmingham, Indianapolis and other
points, and was around all last year
without seeing much service except in
relief jobs.
In spring camp this year Elmer
still was just another mouth to feed,
and it actually wasn't until the cur-
rent campaign was well under way
that McKechnie looked around des-
perately for some help. Since then
Elmer has beaten every club in the
league except Pittsburgh, and his last
six victories have been complete
games.

from us, a phenomenon which hasn't
occurred for years.
Our major concern, Professor Ait-
on asserted, is that no Latin Ameri-
can country sacrifice its independence
through any outside economic control.
We have come to realize, he said,
"by watching Nazi methods, that they
use the trade method with the great-
e't effect, and since 50 per cent of
South American exports went to Ger-
man-dominated countries this is a
serious problem for the United States
to consider, for economic penetration
is invariably followed by political
penetration and possible alien infil-
tration."
The fate of South America, Profes-
Fire College
Students Here
Go To Work
Local Firemen Halt Blaze
In Downtown Restaurant
While Visitors Look On
Local firemen attending the Mich-
igan Fire College here had an oppor-
tunity to put what they have been
learning to the test eariy yesterday
morning when a $10,000 fire gutted
a downtown restaurant-confectionery
store.
Scores of visiting firemen watched
with interest as Ann Arbor's gas mask
attired smoke battlers worked to halt
the blaze. One ardent out-of-town
fire college student even brought his
own gas mask to the scene of action.
At 'the college proper, the after-
noon session yesterday was featured
by a demonstration lecture on high-
voltageelectrical hazards.
The final session of the convention
will present four talks at 9 a.m. to-
day in the Kellogg Auditorium.
Burr Taylor of the Western Actuar-
ial Bureau will open the program
with a talk on "Fire Department In-
spections," to be followed by "Mary-
land Firemen in National Defense"
by Chief J. Just, director of the fire
service extension of the University of
Maryland College of Engineering.
"Regional Fire Department Organi-
zations," by A. B. Carie of Rochester,
Mich., and "Electrical Fire Hazards"
by A. T. Babbitt of the Michigan In-
spection Bureau.
French Group Will Hold
First Roundtable Today
First of this summer's French round
tables will be held at 8 p.m. today at
the International Center.
A weekly affair, the round table
gives those who speak French an op-
portunity to engage in free discus-
scin of French art, literature and
culture in general..

sor Aiton claimed, is largely contin-
gent upon what happens to Great
Britain. The predominant attitude
of the Latin Americans now, he in-
dicated, is to preserve independence
at all costs, while most of the people
profess to be pro-British.
There is an old German population
in South Brazil and Chile, and al-
though they might be swayed by a
victorious Germany, they offer no
great threat at present. Professor
Aiton replied when questioned on the
potential danger of a German popu-
lation in South America.
No Strong Nazi Ties
These German groups are largely
cultural islands, he explained, and
since most of them immigrated in
the nineteenth century they have no
strong ties with the Nazi system.
However, he added, Brazil has taken
drastic steps to curb pro-Nazi move-
ments and has gone so far as to pro-
hibit the teaching of German in the
public schools.
Our greatest danger in regard to
Nazi infiltration, Professor Aiton
pointed out, is that South America
is such a vast and comparatively de-
fenseless continent that it would be
quite possible for an enemy to estab-
lish bases on the mainland, thus ne-
gating the island defenses. There-
fore, he said, a hostile lodgement in
Brazil would negate Trinidad, and
an enemy base in Columbia would
constitute a serious threat to Panama.
League Holds
'Dixie Doodle'
Dance Today
Sweet watermelon and tunes from
below the Mason-Dixon Line will
mark the "Dixie Doodle" dance to be
held from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. today in
the League Ballroom.
Prof. J. S. Worley of the Universi-
ty's engineering department and Prof.
W. A. Clarke of the University of
Florida have been delegated to cut
and distribute watermelon from 7:30
p.m. to dance time in the garden.
The watermelon cut will be com-
plimentary to students from Alabama,
Arizona, Arkansas, California, Dela-
ware, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Ken-
tucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Mary-
land, New Mexico, North Carolina,
Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennes-
see, Texas, Virginia and West Vir-
ginia. Northerners are also invited
to attend.
Hostesses will include Rowena
Sheffer, Henrietta Adomaf, Margery
Sperry, Betty Friedel, Edith R. Sum-
mers, Dorothy Davidson, Janice Mc-
Ivor, Ellen Goldstone, Vivian Spring-
er, Beatrice Selvin, Harriet Rosen-
feld, Josephine Clancy, Eleanor To-
bin, Marilyn Vogel, Dorothy Vogel
and Jo Boyce. Students may come
with or without partners.
Tomorrow's dance, the "Yankee
Doodle," will honor the rival side,
though chairmen Ruth Gram and
Nancy Bonisteel emphasize the fact
that all students are welcome. Clark
McClellan and his orchestra will play
for both dances.
Week Days 2-4-7-9 P.M.
Today & Saturday
CLARK GABLE
ROSALIND RUSSELL

illl

The Daily Calls

For

Tryouts ....

212; 775, 412.
No. 776, 368; 777, 503;'
779, 709; 780, 466; 781, 159;
783, 101; 784, 332; 785, 771;
787, 699; 788, 438; 789, 94;
791, 706; 792, 539; 793, 664;
795, 487; 796, 600; 797, 686;
799, 77; 800, 20.

778,
782,
786,
790,
794,
798,

772;
740;
560;
712;
414;
158;

The Michigan Daily presents

real

0"

/M1

ryction n fModernGyooy lgi"

Starting TODAY!

opportunity for summer session stu-
dents to gain practical experience in
many phases of newspaper advertising
work. All those interested should re-
port at the Student Publications Build=

in
"7.Ae *(et
in gokn6 al

ing on Maynard

Street.

"1

i

III I

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11111

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