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July 09, 1941 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1941-07-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNEST.lAY Y 9.

THE MCHIG N DALY WENESDY..iI___
____--_-_-I U -----

W IW 4914 4A, Af

Lecads Leaggue Orchestra

CLARK McCLELLAN
* * *
League's Plan
Of Tea Dances
Is Announced

McClellan's Band
For Weekly
Open To All

To Play
A ffairs
Students

I

Large yellow ribbons will dis-
tinguish hostesses at the first free
tea dance of the Summer Session, to
be held from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. today
in the ballroom of the Women's
League.
Duty of these women will be the
same as for hostesses at the Friday
and Saturday dances, to introduce
students who have come without part-
ners, and in general to see that every-
one present has a lively time.
Chairman Elsie Courtney and her
assistant, Jean Rendinell, have
planned various mixers, to keep dan-
cers circulating, and are promising
free refreshments.
Orchestra at these tea dances,
which will be weekly affairs through
the summer, is Clark McClellan's
Rhythm Club, which also plays at the
weekend dances. McClellan, whose
club is an Ypsilanti aggregation, has
provided rhythms in the past at sev-
eral fraternity and soroity functions
in the University.
Besides the 11 members of the
League Council, the following women
will serve as hostesses: Olive Beebe,
Betty Newton, Lois Cowan, Pat Don-
nelly, Lois Drummond, Margaret Ens-
wiler, Anneth Palmquist, Mary Jane
Morris, Helen Hagy and Dorothy
Love.
Students are again reminded that
these afternoon dances, a pleasant
means of making friends, are open to
the entire campus, at no charge.
ROGER LEWIS ELIMINATED
PHLADELPHIA-(P)- Roger Lew-
is, Ann Arbor, eliminated in the first
round of the singles National Inter-
scholastic Tennis Championships to-
day by Grant Small, Scarborough,
N.Y., 6-3, 6-2.

iBaker's Wife'
To Be Shown
B yArt Cinema
One of the four outstanding foreign
motion pictures to be shown here this
summer by the Art Cinema League is
the French film starring Raimu in
"The Baker's Wife.",
Directed by Marcel Pagnol and
based on an incident in a novel by
Jean Giono, "The Baker's Wife" has
been termed the funniest and most
realistic French movie to be shown in
this country in years. The title role
is played by Ginette Leclerc. English
titles are by John Erskine.
Other films which will be brought
here this summer by the Art Cinema
League are "Peg of Old Drury,"
"Crime and Punishment" and "The
Cobbler of Koepenick." "The Baker's
Wife" will be shown at 8:15 p.m.
Sunday, July 20, in the lecture hall
of the Rackham Building.
Tickets for the series of four will
be on sale until Sunday, when the
first film, "Peg of Old Drury," will be
presented at 8:15 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Building lecture hall. The sea-
son tickets may be obtained for $1
at the Union, the League and Wahr's
book store. No tickets will be sold for
individual performances.
Purdom Talk Tells
Why Jobseekers
Faii To Be Placed
Using slides and demonstrations to
emphasize his points, Dr. T. Luther
Purdom, director of the Bureau of
Appointments and Occupational In-
formation, showed in a lecture yester-
day that prospective teachers who
major in overcrowded fields have little
or nogchance of securing positions
after graduation.
Dr. Purdom, opening the first of a
series of three lectures on "Why Peo-
ple Do Not Get Jobs," flashed slides
graphically illustrating the ratio of
supply and demand in popular teach-
ing majors. Some fields are vastly
overcrowded while others, in which
there is an immediate and pressing
demand, are without sufficient appli-
cants to fill all the positions needed.
Demonstrations of actual office
scenes were shown, explaining how
"Course Obstacles" throw difficulties
in the way of teachers looking for
jobs.
At 7 p.m. next Tuesday in the
Rackham Lecture Hall, the second of
the lecture series will be presented
under the heading "Undesirable Per-
sonality Traits." Third and last of
the talks will be the following Tues-
day when "Why People Do Not Hold
Jobs" will be the topic for discussion.
Decreases in the number of horses
and mules in the past 20 years has
released enough land to feed 84 mil-
lion persons.

First Baseball
League Games
Are Announced
Six Teams Open Series
On South Ferry Field
At 4:15 P.M. Tomorrow
Organization of one intramural
baseball league and the scheduling
of the first games were announced
yesterday by A. A. James, director of
the summer intramural sports pro-
gram.
While there will be two baseball
leagues, only the American League
is completely organized. The first
games will be played at 4:15 p.m.
tomorrow. The schedule is as fol-
lows:
Blitzkriegers vs. Tigers
Chemists vs. Legal Eagles
Curriculum Workshop vs. Indians.
These six teams will play twice a
week for the next three weeks. The
second league will be organized at
the end of this week and the first
games played at 4:15 p.m. Monday.
The only game scheduled so far
for Monday is between the Physics
Department and the Pretzel Benders.
League House Reception
Students of the Summer Session
and visiting members of the New Edu-
cation Fellowship conference are in-
vited to a reception Friday at the
Smith League House II, located at.
1102 East Ann. Following the re-
ceptiton, from 9 to 10:30 p.m., there
will be dancing till 1 a.m.

One of many exhibits being dis-
played in connection with the eighth
international conference of the New
Education Fellowship. a special exhi-
bition on Indian education prepared
by the Office of Indian Affairs of
the Department of Interior is being
shown in the gymnasium of Ann
Arbor High School.
The exhibition was especially pre-
pared by the Haskell Institute of
Kansas, under the direction of Mr
George Berg, and was shipped to
Ann Arbor for the conference. Twelve
Indian students were sent to put up
the display.
The exhibit is enclosed in a large
house 22 feet by 100 feet, weighing
more than 13,000 pounds, and depicts
the progress that has been made in
Kaufman-Hart Comedy
To Open At Mendelssohn
(Continued from Page 1)
is one of the 1940-41 hits on Broad-
way. It opened at the Lyceum The-
atre in New York in October, 1940,
and ran well into the spring. It is
based to a certain extent on the per-
sonal experiences of Moss Hart who
owns a farm in Pennsylvania and it
is told in the typical Kaufman-Hart
wisecrack manner.
Direction is under Prof. Valentine
B. Windt of the speech department
while Alexander Wyckoff designed
the scenery. Evelyn Cohen is costum-
iere.

nld ian Exhibition Portrays Life,
Ceremonies Of Navajo Indian

education among the Navajo Indians.
It also shows Indian life, their
ceremonials, religions and agricultur-
al activities. The government has
sent several Indians to demonstrate
the native activities of weaving, bread
making and mural painting. Chester
Yellowhair and Catherine Vie have
come from the Window Rock Reserva-
tion in Arizona to demonstrate the
Indian crafts.
There is also a Mexican market
place as part of the exhibit, where
visitors may purchase Indian rugs,
rings and pottery.
Snead Takes Honors
I Golfing Tourney
DENVER, July 8. -(A)- Samuel
Jackson Snead, the man who had so
much misery in his back not long
ago that le was considered a doubt-
ful starter in this tournament, roared
home today to win qualifying honors
of the National Professional Golfers
Association Championship.
The ex-Virginia hillbilly strutted in
with a par-busting 69, identical with
his first round effort on the lake
and creek criss-crossed Cherry Hills
Course, for a 36-hole total of 138. Par
for the course is 35-36-71.
Over 300 fine Spring weight
Suits, all shades and models
tailored by Michaels-Stern and
other fine makers.
$40.00SUITS $32.00
$35-00 SU ITS $28.00
$30.00 SUITS $28.00
$25-00 SUITS $19.75
BUY NOW at these fine sav-
ings. Many garments suitable
for Fall wear.
1ST1ENCATIV mLNSERAT
116 EAST LIBERTY

r

it . __ :_.___. _ _____

A

New and Modern

4

MEN'S TOGGERY
We are pleased to offer to the .Men of Ann Arbor
a Men's Shop that is specifically designed to give
them truly fine clothes and service. The modern
atmosphere of our new store, its fluorescent light-
ing facilities, its stylish fixtures, and youthful air
-all help to make your buying more effective
and pleasant.

L

aI

11

513 EAST

LIBERTY

Just a few steps west of the Michigan Theafer

x4

11

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1ii
II.

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All-Campus Women's Tournaments
Sponsored by the Women's Physical Education Department
Check in the square below those tournaments you wish to enter:
L Archery - Columbia Round
F] Badminton - Women's Singles
E] Golf - Women's Open Singles
Q Tennis - Women's Singles
[lITennis - Mixed Doubles*
(*Partner's Name:)
Mail or bring entries to Barbour Gymnasium not later than Monday,
July 7.
Tournaments will be posted in the Women's Athletic Building (Bad-
minton in Barbour Gymnasium), by Thursday, July 10.
Name
Telephone Number

On

Sale

Today

1941

s
Studer

ummer

&u

Directory

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P

35c

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NUNN-BUSII ANKLE FASHIONED

Home Address

Ann Arbor Address,

Phone Number

SHOES FOR MEN

No Gapping ... No Rsbbing . .. No Slipping
SHOES THAT FIT THE FOOT
$9 and up
EDGERTON SHOES MADE BY NUNN-BUSH
$5 t X7.R

and School of Every Student in Summer School.
On Sale in Bookstores. On Camnujs

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