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August 16, 1941 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1941-08-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAALLY na
1 .I

tI

Long History
(Continued from Page 4)
Widely known for his work in both
academic and industrial phases of
engineering, Dean Anderson con-
tinued as head of the college until
his death Oct. 14, 1939. He suc-
cumbed to a heart attack while lis-
tening to a broadcast of the Michi-
gan-Iowa football game.
The present head of the college,
Dean Ivan C. Crawford, came here
after a varied career in army, aca-
demic and practical engineering. He
was formerly dean of the engineering
college of the University of Kansas.
Centered In South Wing
During the early days of the Uni-
versity, work in engineering was cen-
tered in what is now the old south
wing of University Hall. When
cramping in these inadequate quar-
ters became acute, the first section
of the engineering laboratories was
built in 1881 at the insistence of Dr.
Frieze, then acting president. At
short intervals further additions
were made, and in 1900 the building
now known as the Engineering Shops
was completed.
The rapidly expanding engineer-
ing school, however, soon outgrew its
quarters. Temporary facilities were
found in a residence building on the
site of the present Clements Library,
and in 1902 the construction of the
present West Engineering Building
was authorized, and later supple-
mented by the East Engineering
Building.
U. Of Michigan
Will Celebrate
100th Birthday
(Continued from Page 4)
The catalogue gives a vivid and
complete picture of the student life
of the first few years of the Uni-
versity. Livy, Xenophon and alge-
bra were the mental -bill of fare fed
those seven students, with a more
varied program later added that in-
cluded Horace, Thucydides, Roman
a itiquities, applied algebra and ge-
omnetry.
Day Began At 5:30
The bell was rung before daylight
each day, chapel services were held
at 5:30 a.m., and the first class at
6:30 a.m., with other recitations after
breakfast.
There were three recitations or lec-
tures each day, except Saturday,
when there was but one recitation
and an "exercise in elocution." The
students were also subjected to
weekly exercises in translation, com-
position and written disputations.
"Public examinations are held at
the close of each term, attended by
the Board of Visitors, appointed an-
nually by the Superintendent of
Public Instruction." -
The school year was composed of
three terms of 14 weeks each, with
a six-weeks summer vacation begin-
ning in August, two weeks at Christ-
mas and four weeks in the spring.
Even in those days there were stu-
dent pranksters. Geese and donkeys
often appeared in odd places, and
once a wagonload of wood turned
up on the roof of Mason Hall.
Lived In Mason Hall
The 10 seniors, 18 juniors, 14 soph-
omores and 11 freshmen who attend-
ed the University in 1845 lived in
Mason Hall, which also included a
4,500-volume library, classrooms, a
chapel and various geological, botan-
ical and zoological collections.
Two students would occupy one
study with two bedrooms opening on
it. Residents had td furnish their
own rooms and clean their quarters.
The refuse was swept into the hall
where the janitor swept it up.

Expenses were from $70 to $100 a
year, according to the catalogue.
There was no tuition charge, but $10
of this went for admission fees and
$7.50 for "services of the janitor."
Professors were paid $500 annually
and allowed to live in houses built
for them by the University.
Unable To Pay Teachers
In January,1842, the Board of Re-
gents was unable to pay the teachers'
salaries, but Professors Whiting and
Williams remained until the emer-
gency passed. In 1844 the salary of
the professors was raised to $700.
An attempt was made to establish
a college paper in 1843, but failed.
Fraternities first came to the Uni-
versity in 1845, when Beta Theta Phi
and Chi Psi installed chapters. Chi
Psi built a log chapter house in the
woods east of the campus, heralded
as perhaps the first chapter house
at any college.
First Graduation
The graduation of the first class,
with its 12 graduates, is described in
Elizabeth M. Farrand's "History of
the University of Michigan," pub-
lished in 1884:
"It was a great day for the town-as
well as for the University; merchants
closed their stores, and old and young
crowded to the church. Each stu-
dent of the graduating class delivered
an ontion .nd in the indrment of

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STUDENTS!

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GREENE S
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PROMPT SERVICE on Short Notice

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