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July 04, 1940 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1940-07-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

era J. Kahn,

Frank Morgan
Wed In Detroit

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-DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

m

Barbara J. Lutts Married
To Laurence D. Smith
In SdturdayCeremony
Helen Kipf Is Bride
A Detroit wedding this week united
in marriage Lyra Justine Kahn,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Reuben L.
Kahn, of Ann Arbor, and Frank
Richard Morgan, '42L, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert E. Morgan, of Cres-
co, Ta.
The ceremony was performed
Tuesday in the First United Commu-
rity Church by the Rev. Charles J.
Keppel. The bride was attended by
Marcia Sharfman, of Ann Arbor, and
David Kahn, 'brother of the bride,
also of this city, performed the du-
ties of best man for Mr. Morgan.
Mrs. Morgaia is a former student
- of the University, also attending the
Women's College of the University
of North Carolina. ' Mr. Morgan was
graduated from the literary college
in 1939, and while attending the law
school this year served as assistant
resident advisor at Adams House in
the West Quadrangle. While on cam-
pus he was a member of Sphinx,
Michigamua, the 11M" Club, and the
wrestling team.
Lutts-Smith
The wedding of two University
alumni took place Saturday, June
29, in Allegan, when Barbara J. Lutts,
of Allegan, and Laurence D. Smith,
of Grand Rapids, were married. The
ceremony was read in the First Con-
gregational Church there, and the
Rev. C. 4. Wilcox officiated.
The bride was assisted by her sis-
ter. Betty Lutts, and by Elizabeth
Hansen, of Ludington, 'a University
graduate, and Mrs. Charles Ray, of
Allegan. The best man was Robert
G. Alexander, '36E, of Grand Rapids,
and the ushers were Robert F. Irwin,
of Allegan, Joseph G. Griswold; Jr.,
Frederick S., Larned and John L.
Wierengo, dll of Grand Rapids.
Mrs. Smith was a member of Kap-
pa Kappa Gamma and of Alpha Sig-
ma Rho while on campus. Mr. Smith
is a member of Alpha Delta Phi, as
were several of his attendants, Phi
Delta Phi professional fraternity, and
of Michigamua. The couple will live
in Grand Rapids, where Mr.Smith
is an attorney.
Kipf-Jensen
Helen Kipf, '37, and Joseph E.
Jensen, '35E, were married Saturday
in St. John's Lutheran Church at
Elyria, 0. Rosemary Neuhaus, of
Saginaw, who was a roommate of
Mrs. Jensenwhile they attended the
University, was the maid of honor.
Caryl and Betty Kipf, sisters of the
bride, served as bridesmaids, and Dr.
L. M. Legatski, '31, was best man.
Mr. and Mrs. Jensen plan to live in
Midland, where the bridegroom is
employed as engineering superinten-
dent for a construction company.
The wedding of Jeanne Allys Pray,
'39, daughter of Mrs. L. Arthur Pray,
of Ann Arbor, and Dr. Frank F.
Pray, of Jackson, to Ed win John
Latoszewski of the United States Air
Corps, was an event of Tuesday July
2. Lieut. Latoszewski is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Valentine Latoszewski,
of Jackson. y
The ceremony -was peformed in
St. Thomas Catholic Church by the
Rev. Clair J. Berry. Mrs. Latoszew-
ski's three sisters, Mrs. Erwin Foster,
of Plymouth, Janet Pray and Mrs.
Margaret Dean, both of Ann Arbor,.
were her attendants.
The best man was Lieut. Elwood
Paul Ronahue of Langley Field, Va.
Both he and the bridegroom are
graduates of the United States Mili-
tary Academy at West Point.
The couple will live in San Fran-
cisco, where Lieut. Latoszewski has
a post at the Army Air Corps base at
Hamilton Field.

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(Continued from Page 2)
South, Dr. Dudley
Starbard, Melinda
Steidtmann, W. E.
Stoddard, Charles H.
Takahashi, Bill
Varandyan, Emmanuel
Vuillemin, Margueite Marie
Watkins, John Henry
Weiser, Dr. H. B.
White, Frederick
White, Minnetti
Williams, Robert M.
Youngs, J. W. Theodore.
Registration: Registration blanks
will be distributed by both the teach-
ing and general divisions of the Bu-
reau of Appointments on Tues., Wed.,
and Fri., July 2, 3, and 5. Office
hours are 9-12, 2-4. Everyone who
wishes to enroll is urged to do so at
this time as only one registration is
held during the summer session.
The University Bureau of
Appointments and
Occupational Information.
Public Health Nursing Certificate
candidates for August 1940 should
make application at the office of the
School of Education, 1437 U.ES.
Students, College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: Except under
extraordinary circumstances, courses
dropped after the THIRD week, Sat-
urday, July 13th, will be recorded
with a grade of E.

E. A. Walter

College of Litcrature, Science, and.
The Arts, School of Music, and
School of Education: Students who
received marks of I or X at the close
of their last semester or summer
session of attendance will receive a
grade of E in the course unless this
work is made up by July 24th. Stu-
dents wishing an extension of time
beyond this date in order to make
up the work should file a petition
addressed to the appropriate official
in their school with Room 4 U. H.
where it will be transmitted.
Students, College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: No course may
be elected for credit after the end of
the second week. Saturday, July 6th,
is therefore the last date on which
new elections may be approved. The
willingness of an individual instruct-
or to admit a student later will not

1939
wi
Ot
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affect the operation of this rule.
School of Education, Changes of
Elections (Undergraduates): No
course may be elected for credit after
Sat., July 6; no course may be
dropped without penalty after Sat.,
July 13. Any changes of elections of
students enrolled in this school must
be reported at the Registrar's office,
4 University Hall.
Membership in a class does not
cease nor begin until all changes
have been thus officially registered.
Arrangements made with instructors
are not official changes.
Exhibition of American Painting
presented by the graduate study pro-
gram in American Culture and Insti-
tutions is being held in the Rackham
Building through July 31, daily ex-
cept Sunday, 2-5 p.m. and 7-10 p.m.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
has received notice of the following
Civil Service examination. Last date
for filing application is noted:
Associate Aircraft Inspector (fac-
tory), $2,900, open indefinitely.
Associate Air Carrier Maintenance
Inspector, $2,900, open indefinitely.
Senior Inspector, Engineering Ma-
terials (aeronautical), $2,600, open
indefinitely.
Inspector, Engineering Materials
(aeronautical), $2,600, open indef-
initely.
Junior Inspector, Engineering Ma-
terials (aeronautical), $1,800, open
indefinitely.
Senior Engineering Aid (topogra-
phic), $2,000, Dec. 31, 1940.
Chief Engineering Draftsman (ord-
nance), $2,600, June 30, 1941.
Principal Engineering Draftsman
(ordnance), $2,300, June 30, 1941.
Senior Engineering Draftsman
(ordnance), $2,000, June 30, 1941.
Engineering Draftsman (ordnance)
$1,800, June 30, 1941.
Assistant Engineering Draftsman
(ordnance), $1,620, June 30, 1941.
Visual Information Specialist, $3,-
800, July 30, 1940.
Associate Visual Information Spe-
cialist, $3,200, July 30, 1940.
Assistant Visual Information Spe-
cialist, $2,600, July 30, 1940.
Bilingual Stenographer, $1,800,
July 29, 1940.
Marine Surveyor, $3,200, July 29,
1940.
Inspector, Welding, $2,600, July 29,
1940.
Complete announcements on file
at the University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information.
Office hours 9-12 and 2-4. 201 Mason
Hall.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information.
SER VICE
LAUNDERING -9
SILVER LAUNDRY
607 Hoover Phone 5594
Free pickups and deliveries
Price List
All articles washed and ironed.
Shirts.....................14
Undershirts..................04
Shorts.....................04
Pajama Suits ...............10
Socks, pair ........... ....'.03
Handkerchiefs ..............02
Bath Towels................03
All Work Guaranteed
Also special prices on Coed's laun-
dries. All bundles done separately.
No markings. Silks, wools our
specialty. 14

pw-
a
er ctovt on Yi'lodern Goolin
Love! Lightst
Laughter. LANG:
Crashing Broadway.. , win-
ning roamance...your "Dana.
ing Co-Ed" at her best i
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Persons on the right are shown descending from the smashed end of a highway bridge at Hallettsville,
Tex.-sole means of entrance and exit from the city left crippled by floods. At least four persons died as
cloudbursts sent streams out of their banks.

Ray Atherton, a native of Brook-
line, Mass., has been named di-
rector of the division of European
affairs in the state department,
succeeding Jay Pierrepont Moffat.
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'HANDY
DII E C

Here's the schoolhouse in Elwood, Ind., where Republican presi-
dential nominee Wendell Willkie will formally accept the nomination.
G.O.P. stalwarts point out that a sign over the entrance reads, "The
hope of our country."

Tough days of campaigning lie ahead of Wendell Willkie, Republi-
can presidential nominee, shown with his wife as both began to plan fr
the big political battle. They have one son, live in New York.

it
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I

ARTICLES FOR SALE
PLYMOUTH 2-door Roadking;
th push-button radio, heater and
,her accesories. Reasonable price.
E. Wisner, 1306 Washtenaw.
hone 2-1988. 25
MISCELLANEOUS-20

I

THE LANTERN SHOP Tea Room,
1107 Willard-will serve regular
Luncheons and Dinners July 4th.
Luncheon 12:00 till 2:00-35c to 50c
Dinner-5:30 till '1:30-50c to 85c
28

I --- -

COLLEGE BEAUTY SHOP offers
good work at low prices. Shampoo
and wave. $.50; oil manicure. $.50;
oil permanent, $1.95. Phone 2-2813.
LAUNDERING -9

i - - -_

I I

LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at a low price.

CONTINUOUS TODAY 1:00-11:30 P.M.

HOLIDAY PRICES
35c PLUS TAX 39c

eJ!fl~TflTh

It'll be steaks, with potatoes,
rolls and milk on the side, for
Actress Gail Page from now on.
Because she decided "I would ra-
ther be healthy than glamourous,"
Gail is quitting the movies to de-
vote herself to radio work, where
she can eat what she likes:

OREGON, HERE WE COME!'-Determined to wrest new homes from virgin land, some 25 families
left Long Beach, Calif., bound for a 600-acre tract they'd acquired near Grants Pass, Ore. Their leader, J.
W. Wilson, waves them on; he plans to use the gun for bear hunting.

STARTING TQDAY
THEY SHARE EVERY RISK UN

Vlt

With
VIRGINIA BRUCE
DENNIS MORGAN
WAYNE MORRIS
RALPH BELLAMY
JANE WYMAN
Directed by

NNIV/- -qm

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