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July 03, 1940 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1940-07-03

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Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1940

_OU WDNSYJUY ,Y_4

Max Baer Scores Technical Knockout Over Galento

In 8th

V

Fistic Clown
Upsets '2 Ton'
Before_30,000
Referee Joe Mangold Stops
Fight When Bartender's
Month Bleeds Seriously
Baer Wins 6 Rounds
ROOSEVELT STADIUM, JERSEY
CITY, N. J., July 2.-UP)-Max Baer
sprang the year's biggest fistic upset
tonight by stopping Tony Galento
at the start of the eighth round of
their scheduled fifteen-round fight
before a crowd estimated at 30,000.
Referee Joe Mangold, examining
Tony's cut, a bleeding mouth, in the
minute rest period between the sev-
enth and eighth rounds, stopped the
fight just as the bell sounded to start
the eighth, and officials announced
that the fight was halted in that
session.
Bae weigher 221% and Galento
244.
Tony's Mouth Gashed
Galento's handlers announced at
the end of the fight that Tony's
mouth, gashed in a row with his
brother in his saloon two nights ago,
had been cut right through by Baer's
punches. They also said his right'
hand was hurt.
Baer was boss all the way, success-
fully eluding Tony's rushes and wild1
swings most of the time by ducking,
and scoring with both fists himself.
On the Associated Press score card
he won six of the seven completed
rounds.
Max had Tory's mouth bleeding
in the first round and worked on this
wound from there on, until Galento's
chin was literally dripping blood.
Maxie Still Clowns
The seventh and last round went
like this: Maxie, clowning, came out
in a half-crouch, stabbed a left to
the body and then fired a right to1
the head. Galento, in a half clinch,1
threw a right to the nose. For sev-
eral' seconds they stood near a -neu-
tral corner posing. Then Tony flash-
ed in three times with his left to
Max's head. Tony rushed in and1
stumbled to one knee. Baer threw
three fearful rights to the face.
They stood near a neutral corner
again and banged away with neither
offering any kind of defense. MaxI
landed left, right, left and right againt
to the face. Then he punched Tony
at will with both hands at the bell.
Baer continued to bang away after
the gong sounded until the refereef
separated them.
With his triumph, Maxie also won1
another chance at heavyweight King
Joe Louis, an honor he may not wel-
come. He was counted out on one
knee in the fourth round when he
went against the Bomber in 1935.
And the chances are that as an older
and wiser head now, he won't exactly
start the bands playing for the sec4
ond encounter, which Promoter Miket
Jacobs has tentatively scheduled forr
Chicago in September.

Culture Study
Group To Hear
Malone, Dale
(Continued from Page 1)
of the U.S. Institute for 0overnment-
al Research.
He is the author of "Territorial
Acquisitions of the U.S.," published
in 1912; "Tales of the Teepee," pub-
lished in 1919; "A History of Oklaho-
ma" with J. S. Buchanan, published
in 1924; "The Prairie Schooner and
Other Poems," published in 1929, and
"The Range Cattle Industry," pub-
lished in 1930. He is compiler of
"Letters of Lafayette," "Frontier
Trails" and, with J. L. Rader, "Read-
ings in Oklahoma History."
A member of Phi Beta Kappa, Pro-
fessor Dale also belongs'to the Amer-
ican Historical Association, the Miss-
issippi Valley Historical Association,
the Agricultural Historical ,Associa-
tion, the American Association of
University Professors, the Oklahoma
Historical Association and the Okla-'
homa State Folk Lore Association.
Friday the Graduate Study Pro-
gram will present one lecture, at
4:15 p.m. This lecture will ber given
by Prof. Stanley D. Dodge of the
geography department, and will be
entitled "Cultural Trends In Relation
to Regional Differences." It will be
held in the auditorium of the Rack-
ham School and the public is invited
to attend.
McCoy Wins
Welter Crown
Lacks Punch To Score
K.O. Over Driskell
DETROIT, July 2.-(R)-Tow-
headed Young Kid McCoy, whose
powerful righ reminds old-timers of
his namesake, gave Mansfield Drisk-
ell a boxing lesson tonight to win
the State welterweight title.
McCoy, just returned from a tour
of the East during which he met
some of the nation's topflight welt-
ers, had Driskell in trouble in the
later rounds but didn't pack enough
punch in his unusual overhand right
to put the Negro title-holder away.
Driskell weighed 142 and McCoy
141. It was the second time in two
weeks that a state crown changed
hands, Benny Goldberg turning the
trick last time to take Charlie Par-
ham's bantamweight belt.
Dancing Lessons
To Be Given Today
At 7:30 p.m. today in the Michi-
gan League Ballroom will be held
the second in the series of six inter-
mediate dancing classes.
The classes, for those who already
know the fundamentals in fox trot,
waltz and tango, is priced at $1.50
for the group. The instructors are
Miss Ethel McCormick, social direc-'
tor of the League, Miss Elva Pascoe
and Miss Barbara MacIntyre. f

Johnny Meets The New Boss

Tigers Reach First lace
As Browns Beat Indians

Johnny Vander Meer, who pitched two consecutive no-hit games
for the Cinchnnati Reds last season, is shown in Cincinnati, with his
new manager, Jewel Ens, of the Indianapolis Indians. Vander Meer is'
attempting to make a comeback in the Minor Leagues.

Baseball's Big Six

(By The. Associated Press)
Batting
Player, Club AB R H
Danning, Giants .224 37 81
Radcliff, Browns .256 29 92
Finney, Red Sox ..269 44 95
Appling, Wh. Sox 229 33 78
Walker, Dodgers ..203 32 69
Gustiie, Pirates . .19223 64
Home Runs
American League
Foxx,, Red Sox..... . .. . .
Trosky, Indians/............
Greenberg, Tigers .............
Home Runs
National League
Mize, Cardinals ..............
Danning, Giants ..............
Fletcher, Pirates.............

PCT
.362
.359
.353
.341
.340
.333
18
17
.15
. 20
.. 11
.. 11

Runs Ratted In
American League
Greenberg, Tigers ..............
Foxx, Red Sox..... .... ...
Walker, Senators ..............

65
63
52

TYPEWRITERS

New L. C. Smith
and Corona, Royal,
Remington, Under-
wood, Noiseless,
portables.

Runs Batted In
National League
Danning, Giants...............55
Mize, Cardinals ................ 51
Fletcher, Pirates ...............50
Aiton And Phelps
Lead Discussions
Prof. A. S. Aiton of the history de-
partment and Prof. D. M. Phelps of
the economics department presented
papers and participated in discus-
sion meetings at the Institute of
Latin American Studies, now in ses-
sion at Austin, Tex.
Professor Aiton yesterday present-
ed a paper on "Changes in the eco-
nomic and political situation in the
Western Hemisphere 'and problems
arising there from as a result of the
war in Europe." A radio address on
the "Historical approach to a better
understanding in the Americas" was
also presented by Professor Aiton.
League Committees Call,
For Additional Workers
Women students or Ann Arbor
residents who are interested in do-
ing work on the Summer Session
social committee at the League but
who were unable to attend the mass
meeting yesterday may call the fol-
lowing persons:
Ruth Streelman, '40Ed, at 4759, if
they wish to hostess at the Wednes-
day afternoon tea dances, Jeanne
Crump, '42, at 4793, for hostessing
at the Friday evening dances, Betty
Hoag, '41, at 5995, for hostessing on
Saturday evenings, or Barbara De
Fries, '42, at 8967, if they wish to
help with League publicity. Miss
De Fries'said that the publicity work
would be principally poster painting,
but that no artistic ability is required.

Sydnor Lectures
On Contribution
Of 'OldSouth'
(Continued from Page 1)
said, depends in part upon establish-
ing satisfactory functional relation-
ships between such regions, more
than one of which exist, with their
major diversities, and general studies
of American regionalism have to a
large extent developed from studies
of southern history and southern re-
gionalism.
'Separate Nationalism'
Professor Sydnor indicated that it
is "barely possible" that the study
of the South might be useful to the
student of nationalism, for the Old
South "once went far down the road
toward separate nationalism," 'al-
though after the Civil War there
was no renewed attempt for Southern
independence. "Here," Professor
Sydnor stated, "was a war that did
not breed a later war; here was a
nationalistic movement that came
to an end . Surely the world
might profit by knowing what caused
the trend toward Southern na'tion-
alism, and by understanding how
the South and the North were in
time reconciled to permanent union
and peace."
Political Boundaries
In the investigation of Southern
history, students "suffer the disturb-
ing but healthy experience of being
pried loose from the political boun-
daries to which social historians
have sometimes too closely adhered,"
Professor Sydnor related. He stress-
ed the fact that the Southern histor-
ian must abandon the problem of
area to consider that of essence, to
discover what the Old South was.
This, he said, leads to a listing of
topics rather than a chronological
approach, which in turn leads to
the need of some sort of unification,
perhaps in a central theme, a uni-
fying principle or a common cause.
Not many historians, Professor
Sydnor stated, have dared, in their
accounting for the peculiarities of
the South, to emphasize human free
will; for, he said. "to assert that
a man ishacting contraryto the
forces about him is to assume great
knowledge of the man and his en-
vironment. The caution of histor-
ians has therefore kept them from
placing much emphasis upon inde-
pendent, clear cut, vigorous human
decision. From the literature of
Southern history one gains the im-
pression that man had very little
to do with the creation of the South
or the causation of the Civil War."

Brooklyn Dodgers Reach
First Place In National
As Cardinals Down Reds
(By The Associated Press)
The Detroit Tigers, baseball's sur-
prise team of the year, climaxed their
steady climb in the American League
today by defeating the Chicago
White Sox 10 to 9 to move into first
place in the standings.
Thus Detroit is a pennant con-
tender for the first time since 1935,
the year the Tigers won the world's
championship, and baseball fever
grips the city and Michigan again.
And in the offing is the Fourth of
July showdown double header with
the Indians.
In winning today Detroit came
from behind four times.
The teams were dadlocked at
eight runs at the end of six and one-
half innings. Detroit broke the tie
when Dick Bartell was hit by a
pitched ball, moved to second on a
walk and scored on a pop single
Rudy York dropped into center field.
What proved to be the winning
run came in the eighth when Ralph
(Red) Kress homered.
In Cleveland the St. Louis Browns
scored five tallies on three homers
as Vernon Kennedy held the Indians
to three runs.
Harlond Clift got one of the four
round-trippers in the fourth off Mel
Harder, Cleveland starter, with none
on and George McQuinn slugged an-
other in the sixth after Roy Cullen-
bine had walked. Kennedy won his
own ball game in the ninth with the
third four-master after Johnny
Berardino had singled.
Flatbush Is Happy
In St. Louis last night Bill McGee
pitched and batted the Cardinals
to a 4 to 0 victory over the Cincin-
nati. Reds. McGee, hanging up his
sixth victory against five defeats,
batted in two of the Cards' runs in
an eighth-inning uprising. The Reds'
loss compiled with the Brooklyn win
over Philadelphia enabled the Dod-
gers to gain first place in the Na-
tional League.
The New York Yankees sprang
Lefty Gomez out of semi-retirement
today and walloped the Washington
Senators 6 to 2 with a 14-hit of-
fensive.
Gomez, who has been suffering
from a back ailment, was on the
mound for the first time since April
19 except for a couple of appearances
in exhibition games. During the sev-
en innings he worked he allowed
nine hits but was .only scored upon
in one inning. In the second Wash-
ington tallied twice on doubles by
Zeke Bonura and Jim Bloodworth
and a single by Pitcher Dutch Leon-
ard.
The Washington knuckle ball star
had a perfect day at the plate, if
not in the box, hitting three for
three.
Athletics Split
Although the Philadelphia Ath-
letics managed to out-slug the hard-
hitting Boston Red Sox in both ends
of today's double header, the Mack-
men had to share the bill, winning
the opener, 4 to 3, but dropping the
nightcap, 15 to 9.
Rookie Ed Heusser, making his
first major league start, was cred-

HANK GREENBERG

ited with the victory in the first
game.
The Sockers walloped George Cas-
ter for 10 hits, including homers by
Joe Cronin and Jimmy Foxx in the
second game while, against Mickey
Harris and Herb Hash, Al Simmons
and Joe Gantenbein hit their first
circuit blows of the year.
In the National League the scrap-
py Brooklyn Dodgers scored a 4 to l;
triumph over the last place Phillies
on Tex Carleton's three-hit pitching
while the Cincinnati Reds, in a night
game at St. Louis, were shutout, 4-0.
Pitchers' Duel
Until the seventh inning the strug-
gle in Philadelphia was a tight hurl-
ing duel between Carleton and Ike
Pearson. Neither gave a hit .in the
first four frames and it remained
for oJe Medwick to b'reak the ice
with his fourth home run of the sea-
son, the first since he has joined
the Dodgers.
The Phillies tied it up in their
half of the fifth on a walk and a
triple by Art Mahan.
The deadlock was broken by a
three-run Dodger rally on four hits
in the seventh. Medwick started off
with a single, went to third on a
single by Babe Phelps and scored on
a single by Dolph Camilli. Phelps
came home when Joe Vosmik hit into
a double play and Pete Coscarart
climaxed the rally with his sixth
home run of the season.
Giants Lose
The Boston Bees eked out a 5 to 3
victory over the New York Giants
with a run on two singles in the
seventh inning deciding the game.
Chet Ross and Gene Moore' hit
homers for three Boston runs in the
sixth.
It was the first triumph for the
Bees in the Polo Grounds this year
and their second in ten starts against
the Giants. The result broke up a
four-game personal winning streak
for Hal Schumacher who gave way
for a pinchhitter in the sixth.
;Bill Lee, the righthander who won
41 games for the Chicago Cubs the
last two seasons, went the route for
the first time in six weeks today,
pitching a 10 to 0 shutout victory
over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
While Lee was tossing five-hit ball,
the Cubs pounded Joe Bowman from
the box in the fifth and continued
the assault on Dick Lanahan. Bob
Collins, rookie catcher, and Bill
Nicholson led the attack with three
hits each.

DAILY at 2-4-7-9 P.M.

Bats In Two Runs

--- Last Day
WALLACE BEERY
20 Mule Team"

II

Starts Thursday
VIRGINIA BRUCE
RALPH BELLAMY
"FLIGHT
ANGELS"
Extra

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
LAUNDERING-9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at a low price.
SILVER LAUNDRY
607 Hoover Phone 5594
Free pi(kups and deliveries
Price List
All articles washed and ironed.
Shirts............. 14
Undershirts................04
Shorts ..................... .04
Pajama Suits..... . .... .10
Socks, pair.. .. ...,...03
Handkerchiefs.......... . .. . .02
Bath Towels................03
All Work Guaranteed
Also special prices on Coed's laun-
dries. All bundles dpne separately.
No markings. Silks, wools our
specialty. 14
ARTICLES FOR SALE
1939 PLYMOUTH 2-door Roadking;
with push-button radio, heater and
other accesories. Reasonable price.
H. E. Wisner, 1306 Washtenaw.
Phone 2-1988. 25
MISCELLANEOUS -20
DRESSMAKING and alterations.
Reasonable rates. Mrs. 'Sturgis,
1426 WashingtonHgts. 2-2975. 24
THE LANTERN SHOP Tea Room,
1107 Willard-will serve regular
Luncheons and Dinners July 4th.
Luncheon 12:00 till 2:00-35c to 50c
]inner-5:30 till 7:30--50c to 85c
28
COLLEGE BEAUTY SHOP offers
good work at low prijes. Shampoo
and wave, $.50; oil manicure, $.50;
oil permanent, $1.95. Phone 2-2813.
FOR RENT
WILL SHARE 3-room apartment or
rent for summer term. Reason-
able. Apply Bill Iverson, 333
Packard, 6-7:30 p.m. 27
TYPING- 18
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
and notary public; mimeograph-
ing. 706 Oakland, phone 6327.

Used typewriters of all makes
bought, sold, rented,
exchanged, cleaned, repaired
FOUNTAIN PENS
STATIONERY
STUDENT and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State Street
Since 1908 Phone 6615

Stockwell Dornitory
To Sponsor Tea Today
The first in a series of weekly teas
to be given throughout the Summer
Session will be held from 4 p.m. to
5:30 p.m. today in the living room
at Stockwell Hall, women's residence
hall.
Mrs. Byrl Fox Bacher, assistant
dean of women, and Mrs. Ellery Pres-
ton, house director, will pour at the
affair. All student residents of the
hall, their acquaintances and friends
among the faculty are cordially in-
vited to attend, Mrs. Preston said.

--- I

SOUTH"Breakfast,
Lunch and
STAT E Dine where
the Food is
Always Fine!"
A SAMPLE OF OUR FAMOUS
ener 'k//en

"Famrous
for Steaks"
HERE'S

_ "fiay

U

U

Soup

Chilled Tomato Juice
Chilled Fruit Cup

1
{
:
. ..

r

U

UNION SODA BAR

SIZZLING CHOICE STEER FILET MIGNON WITH SAUCE..
SIZZLING BRANDED TOP SIRLOIN STEAK WITH SAUCE..
ASSORTED CHOICE GRILLED CHOPS WITH JELLY.......
GRILLED SPECIAL T-BONE STEAK..................
GRILLED WILSON'S CERTIFIED HAM STEAK WITH JELLY.
GRILLED SMALL T-BONE STEAK...................
FRIED FRESH SCALLOPS WITH TARTAR SAUCE.........
GRILLED LAMB CHOPS WITH JELLY.......... .
Choice of Three:
MASHED POTATOES FRESH CARROTS HEAD LETT
POTATO SALAD FRESH SPINACH COTTAGE CH
FRENCH FRIED GREEN BEANS APPLE SA

*.85c
.65c
.60c
.55c
. 55c
.50c
. 54c
.50c
I'UCE
iEESE
,ALICE

/am-ou ItA

For Health..

0

NOW ... is the time to take advantage of the expert
golfing facilities offered at the ...

FRESH FRUIT DRINKS
THICK MALTED MILKS

PIE ICE CREAM

MILK

M

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE
ICED COFFEE ICED TEA

CAKE

11

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19 t , P-

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