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July 20, 1939 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1939-07-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY,

Rugby Players Take To The Air

Tennis Singles
Make Second
RoundPlayoff
Many Upsets Mark Play
Yesterday; Third Round
Gets UnderWay Today
The men's Intramural singles ten-
nis tournament moved into the third
round yesterday with the playoff of
most of the games in the second
series.
Upsets of the previously favored
players marked the second round
play, with Robert Weisman defeating
C. L. Dolph, 6-4, 6-2, and Tooi Xoom-
sai downing R. Van Nordstrand, 6-0,
6-3.
"Favorites" who advanced to the
fourth round were J. R. Kidwell who
defeated Jim Bourquin, 6-3, 6-1, C.
M. Pelto who crushed Dick Latta, 6-1,
6-2, and J. F. Thomson, last year's
tournament winner, who won over

White Sox Owner Dies

Don Treadwell Wins Second
Race; Leads In Tournament

<I

An exact duplicate of Monday's fin-
ish in the 50 yard free style featured
the 50-yard back stroke race in the
all-campus swimming tournament
yesterday.
Asa result Don Treadwell who
duplicated his feat of winning the
free-style finds himself more firmly
entrenched than ever in the van of
the field vying for the mythical
crown. Treadwell has amassed 460
points against 320 for Bill Tull , his
closest competitor so far.
Tull finished second to Treadwell
yesterday followed by George Paul
and Don Currie, the same quartet that
finished one-two-three-four on Mon-
day.
The swimmers will be idle until
next Monday when they clash in the
50-yard breast stroke at 4:30 p.m. in
the waters of the Intramural Pool.
Yesterday's sport scene also wit-

nessed the near completion of the
first round of play for the all-campus
table tennis singles championship.
When the smoke of blazing serves
and forhands had cleared, James Key
had conquered Devon Siith, Mentor
Roberts had defeated N. Bsharah,
A.A., Brand had vanquished M.
Prime, Robert Weisman had beaten
A. Baltacioglo, A. Michelson had
triumphed over Don Currie, and Don
Laurer had humbled Camilo Posada.
Two matches remain to complete
the first round. They will bring to-
gether John Schwarzwalder and Lov-
al Petram and. John Sykes and M. K.
Begdes.
In The Majors
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W. L. Pet.
New York ............60 23 .723
Boston...-......-...48 29 .623
Chicago... . .... .. .46 36 .561
Cleveland .............41 39 .513
Detroit ...............41 41 .500
Washington ...........34 51 .400
Philadelphia ........31 49 .388
St. Louis.............24 57 .296
Yesterday's Results
Detroit 11, Washington 0.
Chicago 4-8, Boston 1-0.
New York at St. Louis, rain.
Only games scheduled.
Today's Games
Washington at Detroit.
New York at St. Louis.
Philadelphia at Cleveland.
Boston at Chicago.

W. Rowland, 6-4, 6-4.
The complete list of
in the second round is:
J. F. Thomson def.
6-4, 6-4.
J. G. Faustina def.
(default).

scores so far
W. Rowland,
E. L. Treat,

Rough and ready rugby is 'aptly demonstrated by bounding players
in Mebourne, Australia,.
University's African Observatory
To Make Special Study Of Mars

Approach'
15 Years
Subject

With the planet Mars now
closer to the earth than it has been
at 'any time in the last 15 years, the
University of Michigan's South Afri-
can observatory at Bldemfontein in
the Orange Free State will be turned
over to Prof. E. C. Slipher of the
Lowell Observatory late this month
for special observations of that
planet.
On July 28, Mars will be .only 35,-
000,000 miles from the earth, the clos-
est it has been since its last favorable
opposition in 1924. The minimum dis-
tance possible is 34,600,000 miles,
while the maximum is 248,000,000
miles. Mars and the earth are brought
closer together than usual at some
oppositions be.cause of the shapes of
their orbits around the sun.
Professor. Slipher's trip to South
Africa is being made because accurate
observations of Mars at this opposi-
tion will be impossible from the nor-
thern hemisphere. The planet will be
very low in the southern sky, only
about 20 degrees above the horizon,
and astronomers never try to do ex-
acting work at such low altitudes, for
the effects of our own atmosphere
then become very pronounced in
causing blurring and unsteady im-
ages. For this reason few, if any, of

rour northern observatories are plan-1
ning to do any systematic work on
Mars at this time. Even the Lowell
Observatory, established largely for
the study of Mars and widely known
as the "Mars center" for our earth,
will not try to do much at its site in
Arizona.
In the southern hemisphere, how-
ever, the situation will be different.
At Bloemfontein, Mars will be almost
directly overhead when it is closest to
the earth. Because of its favorable
situation, facilities of the Michigan
observatory have been placed at the
disposal of the Lowell astronomer.
The Bloemfontein institution was
established in 1928 for the discovery
and measurement of double stars in
the southern skies. It is known as the
Lamont-Hussey Observatory in hon-
or of Robert P. Lamont, an alumnus
of the University and the donor of
the observatory, and William J. Hus-
sey, former director of the Michigan
observatories. The Observatory is
equipped with an excellent 2712 inch
refracting telescope. During its first
ten years, 5,650 double stars were
discovered at this observatory.
Because of the great distance be-
tween the planets and the limits to
which the image may be enlarged,
the photographs of Mars to be taken
during Professor Slipher's observa-
tions will have a cross section about
that of an ordinary lead pencil. For
this reason, multitudes of photo-
graphs will be taken, the best to be
preserved for future study and exam-
ination. Visual observations of Mars
will also be made.

Robert Weisman def. C. L. Dolph,
6-4, 6-4.
W. B. Connolly def. N. Upton, 6-3,
6-3.
J. R. Lawson def. Devon Smith.
J. H. Watkins def. Paul Lindquist,
6-2, 6-4.
Leo J. Alilunas def. David Kilner,
6-0, 6-2.
T. F. Dixon def. Conway Sams,
6-2, 6-3.
C. M. Pelto def. Dick Latta, 6-1,
6-2.
Tooi .Xoomsai def.' R. Van Nord-
strand, 6-0, 6-3.
J. R. Kidwell def. Jim Bourquin,
6-3, 6-1.
Elliott, Woody
Address Meet
Discuss State's Program,
Need For Experience
(continued from Page 1)-
National Education Association" by
Dr. Frank Hubbard, acting director
of the research division of the Nation-
al Education Association, and a lec-
ture at 7:15 p.m. at the Union on
"University and High 'School Rela-
tionships"., by Prof. George E. Car-
rothers of, the School of Education.
At 1:,30, p.m. in the University High
School Au itorium a panel discus-
sion, evil ,e held on "The Advan-
tages and Disadvantages of Using a
Basal,,S~ies of Readers" with Supt.
Paul P. Misner of Glencoe, Ill., as
chairman. Members of the panel will
be Miss Veva Dee Craig, principal,
North Olmstead, 0.; Mr. Manley Ir-
win, divisional director of instruc-
tion, Detroit public schools; Miss
Eleanor McGourty, teacher in the
Lincoln School, Toledo, 0.; Miss
Gwen Horsman, auditorium teacher,
Erie, Pa.; Mr. George Beauchamp,
principal of Bloomfield Township
School Britton; and Mr. Victor
Whittemore, superintendent schools
at Pinconning.
See BOB GACH
for Everything photographic
Nickels Arcade

J. Louis Comiskey (above), 54,
owner of the Chicago White Sox
baseball team, died at his summer
home at Eagle River, Wis., after a
long illness. Funeral services were
to be held in Chicago.
Bridge Prizes Awarded
To Mrs. Bailey, Mrs. Gray
Another in a series of weekly bridge
parties was held by the Michigan;
Dames at 2 p.m. yesterday in the
Grand Rapids Room of the League.
Mrs. M. P. Gray won the high
score at contract, and Mrs. C. J.
Bailey won at auction. The prizes
given to the two winners were bath
salts.

r

ammememmi

DETROIT, July 19.-(P)-Amid
fanfare reminiscent of the golden era
of boxing when Tex Rickhard was
the country's leading fight promot-
er, heavyweight champion Joe Louis
and his New York challenger, Bob
Pastor, signed contracts today to
meet in a championship match here
Sept. 20.
Although terms had been agreed
upon weeks ago, the champion and
the challenger affixed their signa-
tures to the document calling for
them to meet over a 20-round route
at Briggs Stadium in Detroit's first
heavyweight championship fight.

Louis And Pastor
For Match In

1

0in corporaI ed

4

wdr

CHAUNCEY T. RAY, President
DOWNTOWN - MAIN & LIBERTY -- FREE DELIVERIES- PHONE 2-4411

Sign
Detroit

July Cearance of
Su-_mm-'ier
Dressle's
Formrlry $ 7.95S and $10.95
Many "One of a Style"
Summer School budgets require careful buying - and
we all know how important cool, catchy dresses are to
the enjoyment of casual afternoon and not-so-casual
evening engagements. Superbly tailored and finished
dresses with a keen eye for tiny details. Made in white
and multi-colored -floral prints, as well as darker
sheers in navy, black and brown that can be worn all
through Fall. "Classroom classics" and "evening en-
vies" in coat dresses, two-piece frocks and some with
jackets.
Second Floor

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s.~,/
{
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Youngest.

MARSHALL CUT-RATE
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DRUGS... COSMETICS... TOBACCOS

Juniors'
Misses'
Women's
Larger
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CHICAGO, July 19.-(1P)-A 13-
year-old boy, Charles A. Comiskey,
2nd, will prboably become the young-
est major league baseball magnate
by inheriting the Chicago White Sox
from his late father, J. Louis' Com-
iskey, thus leaving sole ownership of
the -famous team in the family for
three generations.
Pending filing of the will, probably
next week, the impression prevailed
among intimates tonight that the
ball club would be left in trust for
Charles A. Comiskey until he is of
age.

WOODEN
SHOWER
CLOGS
39c pr.
75c value
Tekemine- Style
Tooth B rushes
6 for 54c

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From any angle, a neat trim
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PHOENIX
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