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August 12, 1939 - Image 22

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1939-08-12

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PAGE TWENTY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, AUG. 12, 1939

Casualness Is Emphasized In Selection Of Wardrobe For C

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Simple Wool
Dresses Are
AlwaysSmart
Sweaters And Skirts Are
Mainstays Of Collegiate
Wardrobe For This Fall
By ALICE RYDELL
By their clothes ye shall know them,
so if you don't want to be labeled a
spanking-green freshman, select your
wardrobe for casualness. Simple
wool dresses are always smart for
clsroom as well as informal dates.
Crisp white collars and cuffs are flat-
tering accents, but think of the laun-
dering! Better choose those wool
I@tsses plain, because our bet is
tt you'll never have free evenings
to sew on all the little white details.
Mainstays Of Wardrobe
Sweaters and skirts are the main-
stay of all college wardrobes. You
will probably bring most attractive
tailored dresses, but ten to one, you'll
live in a couple of pet sweaters and
skirts. In order to give life to this
classic uniform, try unusual color
combinations. It's wise not to get
too loosely woven woolens for the
skirts, because continual sitting in
classrooms has a tendency to make
skirts bag, and the more tightly wov-
en fabrics always hold their shape
better. Plaids will be especially good
for skirts this fall, particularly in
genuine Scotch clan patterns. The
material is often worked on the bias
in pleated skirts to give a definite
1939 air. Then there are the old
favorites, gored or pleated skirts, with
stitching on the seams and plain or
British hems. If you like the pressed-
in gores, be sure to pay enough to be
certain of their being "steeled in."
This insures permanency which a
mere pressed-in gore will not have.
And it's a good idea to have zipper
plackets in all your skirts.
New Jersey Pullover
A new idea to wear with skirts is
the jersey pull-over that is loose
and hip-length with push-up sleeves.
This is particularly good with pat-
terned woven skirts. Windbreaker
jackets, also with push-up sleeves,
coupled with patterned skirts and
bright blouses are more college girls'
meat. A sweater wardrobe is a
pi'ime necessity, from baby-soft an-
goras to hardy woolens. Cashmeres
and shetlands are always in style and
practical too, because you'll be sudsing
thm out yourself, probably. Look
for unusual shades such as grape-
wine and odd greens and fuschias
wlen you're buying sweaters. Styles
are mostly plain cardigans and slip-
overs. Hooded cardigans are some-
thing new. The Brooks type of cardi-
gan is the best-loose and baggy and
long. Wear it with or without a belt.
Enough for sweaters and skirts. A
new fabric for those tailored dresses
is striped angora jersey. The stripe
is often used diagonally and in sharp
contrasting shades such as bright blue
and scarlet oi grey ground. A dress
and coat of twin fabrics is an im-

Outfits Such As These Three Will Be Seen At Campus Affairs This Fall
-14

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Michigan Men Like Neatness,
Informality In Their Clothes
By HARRY 'THE BEAU' KELSEY winter will still look good, assuming
So you're comnig to college? it has been treated right. Or should
We're certainly glad to hear that, l you be in the market for one, you
can still rely on past experience as to
and want to do everything possible what to get. Tanst will be popular,
to start you off right. and greens, and of course greys. The
We can't tell you what courses you green suit that would have been
should take; that depends upon your tstared at, though admired, two years
needs and the University's require- or even a year ago will be one of a
ments. We can't tell you what co-eds thousand this year.
to date, because we don't know (the Mix 'em up, and have a good time
new crop). We can't tell you how to doing it. Green single breasted coat
apple polish your profs, because we with tan gabardine slacks, green
don't know as yet what profs you'll slacks with a light grey coat or grey
have and besides, we've probably or blue slacks with a brown coat not
tried and failed, only vary a matched suit monotony
But we can give you a few tips on but help to keep other people awake
what to bring along in the way of in the classroom and lecture hall. Do
wearing apparel, and what not to your part.
bring along so it won't be in the way. Shirts and ties: the women seem to
This would be a di. .cult thing to like oxford shirts with ribbon shaped
do, as we're not a professional stylist, bow ties, so we shy away from them.
nor do we own a haberdashery; we're Stripes in shirts are good for fall,
just a typwriter pounding (one and the manufacturers have a nice
finger) reporter. We're saved by one stock outs Don't be afraid of the shirt
fact: it doesn't matter what you wear sans tie. .Remember you're coming
in Ann Arbor. to Ann Arbor and not visiting at
We men are rather proud of that Wellesly.
fact. It puts us miles ahead of eastern For ties, use your own judgment.
colleges that demand the latest Lon- They may call you queer, but so did
don styles and term those who don't they Edison. Merely beware of crim-
wear them outcasts. son ties or purple shirts. They're
Yes, Ann Arbor takes its clothes likely to attract the prof's attention
free and easy, and by that we don't to you and result in a quizzing on an
mean that they're handed out by unprepared lesson.
benevolent salesmen at every street When wearing socks, forget about
corner. We mean that if you don't garters; they're a nuisance. Al-
feel like wearing a coat, don't; if though the bright colors of the de-
you don't feel like wearing a tie, pression years (how paradoxical!)
don't; if you don't feel like. wearing seem to be going out, attractive pat-
trousers - well, you'd better; it gets terns in the plainer hues are not hard
chilly awfully quick sometimes. to find. Colors persist in plaids. Wear
Perhaps you are wondering what plaids.
to wear if you do want to wear it. Shoes : anything goes, as long as
That's really the object of this article, they're comfortable. There's a lot of
so, for all who stayed out this long, walking to be done in Ann Arbor. Re-
here we go. member that, and choose shoes that
First consideration is that old fit ,shoes that wear, and shoes with
American standby, brought here wings if possible. Even a Mercury
from who knows where, worn as far would feel the strain.
back as the time of the - well, you'll Hats: why wear a hat? You're
learn that in one of your history continually looking for a hat rack or
courses, maybe: the suit. And here getting the brim in your bere. Leave
we take time out to give thanks that it home.
men's styles do not change as quick- DON'T forget, when packing, to in-
ly, as often as radically as those of clude a raincoat. Ann Arbor is a
the women. sunny place-one minute. The next,
The single breasted, three-button ylou're drenched. The classic ques-
notched lapel cheviot, tweed or worst- tion is "Do you like the weather?" If
ed you bought the middle of last (Continued on Page 21)

This velvet frock should prove to be one of the smash hits of the season as it is alluring and feminine, and will show off the youthful figure to
advantage. It is shown in French blue with the narrow tie at the waistline and the edging along the bodice and neck coming in dull red. The ideal
outfit for campus wear is this three-piece tweed suit. The full-length military coat may be worn separately with casual dresses as the vari-colored
tweed will blend with any costume. The gored skirt and fitted jacket are worn either over a tailored or ruffled blouse or with a gay ascot. This
satin evening gown comes in a soft shade of Degas pink, and is fitted at the bodice with shirring and a concealed zipper placket. The waistline
is high and flares out into a full skirt. The narrow straps of Egyptian brown velvet are fashioned into dainty bows at the shoulders.

4

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portant fashion idea that has been
growing for the past few seasons.
The coat may be matching in de-
sign and color but in a heavier ma-
terial than the dress, or the dress
may match one of the colors in the
coat. Corduroy will be a prominent
novelty fabric for suits as well as
dresses. It is shown mostly in greens,
rust and stone blue.
Suits are in great variety. Close
to every college girl's heart is the
separate go-with-all jacket of bright
plaid ortweed to be worn over tail-
ored dresses or with skirts to make
suits. An interlined one will carry
you over into fur-coat weather. Three
piece suits are practical-topcoat,
jacket and skirt. The jacket is often
patterned this fall in colors blending
or contrasting to the other two pieces.
The topcoats feature swing. These
topcoats are versatile, since they can
be worn over everything else, too. A
new idea is a woven skirt and jacket
in solid color with only the front of
the cardigan in mixture tweed. An
(Continued on Page 21)

Several Ultra-Smart Silks And Formals
Needed For Rushing, W eek-End Dates

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WW EWA

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RIDER'S
302 South State St. (Near Liberty St.)
MONEY-SAVING SPECIALS
ON
BRAND NEW PORTABLES
Pens - Typewriters - Supplies

By ALICE RYDELL
An important part of every college
girl's career is rushing and dates.
Sweaters and skirts will do for the
"P-Bell" (you'll soon know where
that is), but for rushing teas and
dressy dates, a few ultra-smart silks
and formals are requisites.
.Black is always a favorite for dress
silks, but if your wardrobe is built on
browns, better stick to brown or green
or maybe one of the new vintage
shades, which are also good with
black accessories.
Newest lines in fall clothes tend
toward back fullness, best expressed
in the bustling bustle. Subtle re-
movable loops and bows, inverted
pleats or bunched gathers or even a
ruffle of lace on a rounded bustle
line are some of the inventions con-
cocted to give the bustle effect.,
Smocking, that delight of the pantie-
to-match age, has grown up this sea-
son and is being used on big college
sister's dress-up clothes. But it's
used sparingly-just enough to give
design interest.
Princess lines will be outstanding,
particularly in velveteen, for tea-
dances and rushing parties. Another
good velveteen model is a flared and
gored skirt of black or dark velveteen
with a pert bustle-back jacket of
checked wool. Velveteen in rich col-
ors or black also makes a smart suiv,
the skirt of which can serve double
duty with sweaters and go out in the
evening with a glittering blouse.
Shepherd checks are also being wov-
en in velveteen this season. One
checked dress lends novelty to the
coed wardrobe.
For brown devotees, a bias-draped
frock or rayon jersey with fullness
at one shoulder is an outstanding
choice. Rayon or silk jersey is stead-

ily, becoming a favorite to rival silk
crepe for this type of dress, but it
demands a more perfect figure to
wear it well.
Taffeta and faille sometimes com-
bined with velvet or velveteen are two
other key materials with the added
attraction of swishy rustle.
If you prefer wool to silk, you can
easily find date dresses just as smart
in lightweight woolens such as rabbit
hair, wool crepe or faille, or in silk
and wool mixtures. A shadow of silk
and wool with a peplum and skirt
full in the back below a diminutive
waist is an unusual model. Eyelet
woolen is a new fabric destined for a
smart career.
Those are the rushing date dresses.
Don't be alarmed if you can't find a
twin to one of them, but just get an
idea of the general trend.
There are few occasions to wear
hats in Ann Arbor, but in addition to
the hardy roller, you'll need one
dressy hat. Let it be small, first of
all. Black is the most practical
choice unless you find one to match
your pet silk dress exactly. The pill-.
box is a favorite style and especially
becoming to the college girl. Velvet,
silk, and soft felt, with kidskin as a
new airival, are favorite materials.
Black velvet disks, very small and to
be worn tilted far forward, are grand
innovations and most flattering.
For your formal wardrobe, you
won't need more than two to start
with. It's a good idea to have one
with a jacket, too. Of course if you
turn out to be a social butterfly, two
won't nearly reach. But then you
can always wait for the special occa-
sion to invest in a new one; or there's
always your roommate, if she's the
same size.
If your furt coat is versatile, you
(Continued on Page 21)

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"Did you read about my John going to the
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3a. Jbh& eeca*ac4f 943___
tt'he£iarry
Whether you are a freshman medic interested in a
stethoscope or just a freshman looking for a tooth
brush or a co-ed shopping for the right shade of lipstick
you will find The Quarry prepared and ready to serve

.

Above-Very new
back fulness, and tricky
jewelry. 9 to 17.$19.95
Center-Stitched pleat-
ing crossed on bodice,
contrasting belt.
9 to 17......$16.95
Right-Draped bosom,
huge buckle of gold.
tone and rhinestones.
9 to 17.......$16.95

"sign out' junior frocks
as seen m Mademoiselle
Yes, we have those very same dresses you saw advertised
in "Mademoiselle" - smart magazine for college-wise
sophisticates. All of exclusive Lucky Crepe (there IS-
something in a name),:all with the famed Ellen Kaye fit,

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