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July 13, 1938 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1938-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDA

-U

'

Religious Clash
Is Seen Caused
By Nationalism
Kenneth W. Morgan Heads
Week's Second Forum
On Religion Problems
(Continued from Page 1)

force, not holding firmly to what
they advocated and at times not even
sure what they believed."
The problem of anti-semitism has
been spreading too rapidly for com-
fort in America, Mr. Morgan cited,
the evidences of it, of course, being
of a more subtle nature. He was sur-
prised, he said, at the traces of anti-
Jewish feeling in Ann Arbor. He
called anti-semitism a major inter-
faith ramification.
Dr. Raphael Issacs, a member of
the panel, asserted that two ways to
eliminate anti-semitism are open: the
complete abolition of faith lines or
the adoption of a scientific frame of
mind toward religion whereunder no
attitudes would be formed. Other
members in the panel, The Rev.
Fredrick Leech of St. Andrew's
Church and Anano Kelkar, agreed
with Dr. Issacs and Mr. Morgan that
there is a crying need for a place
where peoples of different faiths and
denominations could go to learn the
dogmas and beliefs of the other re-
ligions.
Mr. Morgan hit the keynote to the
solution of inter-faith problems, stat-
ing that 'the road to understanding
lies not in isolation of each group as
a distinct different whole, but con-
certed action among all church
groups on the basis of mutual respect
and appreciation of the likenesses of
the groups rather than a defensive
discrimination caused by differences.
Today's forum will be headed by Dr.
J. M, Dorsey, assistant director of the
Neuropsychiatric Institute, speaking
on "Religion and Mental Hygiene."
Faculty Wives
Greeted At Tea
Affair To Be Given Today
In Garden Of League
Mrs. Louis A. Hopkins will receive
at a tea from 4 to 6 p.m. today in
the Garden of the League, honoring
the wives of all the visiting profes-
sors and special lecturers of the Sum-
mer Session.
The affair is being sponsored by
the Faculty Women's club, Mrs. John
Sundwall acting as chairman, and
cooperating with Miss Ethel McCor-
mick, social director of the Summer
Session, in arrangements.
With Mrs. Hopkins in the receiving
line wlil, be Mrs. Junius E. Beal, Mrs.
Shirley Smith, Mrs. Clarence F.
Yoakum, Dean Byrl -F. Bacher, Mrs.
Ira M. Smith and Miss McCormick.
Those who have been asked to pour
are Mrs. James B. Edmonson, Mrs.
Earl V. Moore, Mrs. Harley A. Haynes,
Mrs. Russel Bunting, Mrs. Fielding
H. Yost, Mrs. Peter Okkelberg, Mrs.
Wells I. Bennett, Mrs. Alfred H.
White, Miss Marian Durell and Mrs.
Wilfred B. Shaw.
Week-end Dances
Held At The Union
The Union Ballroom has been
chosen for the regular Summer Ses-
sion dances to be given\ Friday from
9 p.m. to 1 a.m. and Saturday from
9 p.m. to midnight this week, Miss
Ethel McCormick, social director of
the.Summer Session, announced yes-
terday.
Charlie Zwick's orchestra will play
for the dancing and the price of ad-
mission will remain the same. Of-
ficials willa behpresent to introduce
guests to each other.
The teadance Wednesday, July 20,
will be under the direction of the
Southern Club, with J. T. Norrsi,
Grad., in charge, Miss McCormick
added.
. D.MORRLL
114 S. State St.

Typewriters, Stationery,
Student and Office Supplies
Since 1908 Phone 6615

Holy Land Troubled By New Violence
JERUSALEM
a + 2BEIRUT
oo
DAVD' LELCT'C
CHURCH OFAA
14OLY DAMASCU
SEPULCHREUKR
TEL A~fV / AMA
JAFFAJ FA.)
GATE'
OAVIU ELTRNC
TowJERWIFENCE
ACR GGTBRTSHANATE
& MILE / r//A NE WALIALETE
NAZARETH-' / OL pr
1936 ThTne'Ua hwsJrs Lem.
AFFAAMMAN
SJORDAN~.
BRITISH MANDATE
o 10 20 30 40 so NEW JE WISH STATE
IvIL.ES U§= NEW ARAB STATE
At least 49 persons have been killed and almost 300 injured in out-
bursts of violence between Arabs and Jews in the HolyLand, which Eng-
land is attempting to govern by mandate. Thousands of British soldiers
were rushed to Haifa in an effort to halt the most serious trouble since
1,936. The insert map shows Jerusalem.

1 D

gy MEL FINEBERG;

e

Look Quick Now ...
Take a look at the Major League
star'dings today. Now take another
look. Yes, it's true. It's the 13th of
July and the two morning glories,
Cleveland and Pittsburgh, are leadink
their leagues. Of course, the margin
is slight, so slight that if this column
were written tomorrow, the state-
ment might not be true. But for this
one instant, the Indians and the Pi-
rates are riding the crest.
It's not that the two clubs aren't
used to the top spot. Far from it.
Why in May, the baseball season isn't
considered a success unless Cleveland
and Pittsburgh are leading. But for
them to lead in the middle of July,
why it's positively unheard of-tsk,
tsk.
This year it may be different forI
the Bucs. They had their slump earlyI
and rode into first place yesterday on
top of a 13 game winning streak that
has carried them from fourth place.
True, the margin is only three per-
centage points but fame is sweet and
the Pirates will want to enjoy it to the
hilt.
On paper, the Pirates have the best
club in the league. Arky Vaughn, Gus
Suhr, the two Waners, rookie Rizzo
are good. They have Mace Brown,
probably the best relief pitcher in
either league including Johnny Mur-
phy. Another rookie, Johnny Kling-
er, Cy Blanton, Swift and Tobin
round out a strong pitching corps.
The Pirates have made fans for-
get the mad rush of the Cincinnati
Reds and this year may be the one
for Pie Traynor.
WANT A SCHOLARSHIP
cations are filled by July 28, a schlor-
ship at Hillsdale College will go beg-
ging. The scholarship has been
awarded annually to an outstanding
student vocalist and may be renewed
for a second year if the student per-
forms satisfactory work in the opin-
ion of the Board of Women Com-
missioners of the college. Auditions
are scheduled for July 28 but to date
no application has been filed.

Going Down Please .. -
With Cleveland, however, I think
it's different. The Indians are on
their way down. Allen and Feller
have been doing double duty and
doing it well but the rest of the pitch-
ing staff is shot. Trosky is starting
to fall in batting. Ken Keltner, who
is a darn good third baseman, is now
hitting .290. Frank Pytlak, a smart
catcher, is hitting a bit over his head
and they say that Oscar Vitt is having
his troubles holding the boys.
The big reason, tho, is the Yankees.
New York is the best club in the
league and they're starting to go. In
the early part of the season, the
Yanks were getting neither hitting
nor pitching but still they were al-
ways within reaching distance of
first place. Well, they're beginning
to get both hitting and pitching and
now they're starting to reach.
Down the stretch it will be the
Yankees leading the Red Sox with
Cleveland a sorry third. Very sorry.
Soiihern Students
To Be Feted Friday
At Watermelon Cit
All Southern students and their fri-
ends will be feted at the annual Wa-
termelon Cut which will be held at 7
p.m. Friday, in the League Garden.
John T. Norris, Grad., of Georgia,
president of the Southern Club, is in
charge of arrangements for the affair.
Norris will be assisted by a com-
mittee composed of students repre-
senting various Southern States. Dru-
cilla Hoskins, Grad., secretary of -the
Southern Club, will represent Ken-
tucky; Elizabeth Walden will serve
on the committeeman from South
Carolina; Jesse Lee Wilder, Grad.,
from Florida; Geo Fatherrie, Grad..
from Mississippi, Wallace Duncan
from Alabama, and Dr.,Thompson
from Louisiana.
Dr. T. Luther Purdom, director of
the University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information,
will act as master of ceremonies

F
N
C
C.
B
'3
S
pR

1 a i . ii s)

IN THIS CORNER

Major League StandingsA AMERCAN IEAGU
NATIONAL tl' AGUE Cleveland.............44
ittsburgh........,...44 25 .638 New York............44
few York.............47 27 .635 Boston .,..............41
incinnati ....... .....40 .31 .563 ahn ................41
hicago..............38 35 .521 Washington...........40
oston .................32 34 .485 Detroit ..............37
rooklyn ..............31 42 .425 Chicago ...............30
t. Louis...........29 41 .414 Athletics ..............27
'hillies/........ ....... 21 47 .309 !St. Louis............. 22

E
26
27
29
37
38
36
43
rr 49

MID-SUMMER BARGAIN
CARNIVAL - Thursday!
ALL-
WOOL
As Advertised in the
"Mid-Summer Bargain
Carnival" Edition of the
Ann Arbor News
EVERY STUDENT and faculty
man on the campus can use one
or more of these $16.50 to $18.50
suits at $10.95. Twists, Cheviots,
Flannels, Tweeds! Single- and
doube-breasted models! Shorts,
stouts, regulars. All sizes, 32 to
4G. This is our BIG sale. Don't
miss it! Note: the coats may be
worn as sport coats with summer
slacks; and each coat, alone, is
worth what you payfor coat,
pants and vests.

Pct.
.629
.620
.586
.519
.493
.455
.386
.310

Dr. Finch Discusses
Metathesis Question
(Continued from Page l)
sounds common in all languages, Dr.
Finch suggested that metathesis
might be utilized in the projection of
a new etymology or word-history
upon which he has doner some inves-
tigation. It was his theory that meta-
thesis can link the Greek "phileo",
to love, to the accepted Indo-Euro-
pean hypothetical form "leubh" or
"lubh", for which linguists generally
derive such words as Greek "lupta,"

prostitute, Latin "libido" and, ulti-
mately, English "love."
Subsequent discussion by Institute
members composing the audience in-
cluded not only specific comment
upon this proposed etymology but also
conjectures as to the causes of meta-
thesis of itself. Among the suggestions
was that of Prof. C. L. Meader, who
pointed out that such inversions of
action are, common in all types of
neuro-muscular activity and are due.
to muscular anticipation of a move-
ment the impulse for which is recei-
ved through the nervous system. Ex-
amples of such metathesis, he said,
occur when one'is trying a necktie on.

MEN'S WASH SUITS
single- or double- (
White or cream; $ 95
breasted; regularly
$7.50 ..............

A

LF.

61

F ----- --__ _ -. - - -_----- - - -
Summer School StudentsdIyT(BPRgof.SHO .
on Thursday (Bargain Day) also Fri. and Sut.

SANFORIZED SLACKS, PLAIDS, CHECKS 88c
. SANFORIZED SLACKS; Reg. $1.75, $2.00 ..$1.39
$7.00, $8.50 DRESS PANTS, ALL WOOL $4.45
59c SUSPENDERS. LEATHER END OR SNAP 39c

I

FREE

FREE

vim!

69C

BUY ONE PAIR of our fine shoes-for men or
women on Thursday, Friday, or Saturday and
in co-operation with Ann Arbor Bargain Day,
we will give you another pair (same price) abso-

The famous BABY

of the BROWNIE family
AND a credit to the family, too.
Baby Brownie takes fine, big pic-
tures (1% x 21/2 inches).
It is carefully designed, and styled to
the minute. All in all, the biggest dol-
lafs worth of camera we feature, and
we enthusiastically recommend it to
you for easy picture making.

lutely FREE.

Your choice of any shoe in the

store. For years this offer has been Summer
Students' treat. At this time we sell out our
styles. Two students may buy together and

each take a pair.

Open 9 A.M. to 9 P.M.

'I '

MADRAS
BROADCLOTH
SHANTUNG
EFFECT

A special purchase for this
event. Sun proof, tub proof;
well tailored, full cut. Striped
effeets and plain white. You
would expect to pay $1.79;
our regular Basement price
is $1.39; tomorrow you get
them fore $1.09 or $1.00 each
in sets of three.

$

00'
3 for
$3.00

SHIRTS

* MEN'S ALL WOOL SWIM TRUNKS .98c
* PLAIN COLOR 98c POLO SHIRTS ... 79c

ar-- IG'P

* 29c, 39c SUMMER TIES

19C

AIR-O-PEDIC BOOTERY

-- Thursday Only -

INSIDE SHOE SHOP
Use Wuerth Theatre entrance
MAIN STREET - Downtown

* 59c DARK NOVELTY HOSE..............:..39c
* 35c SHIRTS AND SHORTS 23e
BASEMENT - DOWNTOWN

CALKINS-FLETCH ER
DRUG STORES

324 South State Street

818 South State Street

a

a

omorrow!

f f

Ae d%
dmrlll

Tomorrow!

Ov

11,/lW

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