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August 19, 1938 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1938-08-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Jap Air Fleet
Routs Cinese
Over Hangyeng
Report Says Navy Raiders
Penetrate Far Inland To
Down 32 Pursuit Planes
SHANGHAI, Aug. 19., (Friday),-
(IP)-A Japanese naval air fleet late
yesterday invaded deep central China
and reported destruction of 32 Chi-
nese planes in a tremendous air battle
over Hangyeng airport, Hunan Pro-
vince.
The Japanese struck at the air
base while other warplanes and war-
ships about 300 miles to the north-
west on the Yangtze River bombard-
ed Chinese positions in redoubled ef-
forts to crack the Chinese line de-
fending Hankow.
Chinese reports from Hengyang,
onl the Hankow-Canton Railway, dis-
puted the Japanese report of the air
battle, asserting the Japanese lost
four bombing planes as against one
Chinese pursuit plane.
Another Japanese report said four
Chinese bombers were shot down over
the Yangtze east of Wuchang when
Japanese bombers raided near the
tri-city area of Hankow, Wuchang
and Hanyang Chinese rivercraft wer
bombed.
The Chinese dispatch on this en-
gagement said the Japanese lost one
bomber and the Chinese none.
In Shanghai, the United States
Consulate was asked to protect mail
to the' Chinese-American publishing
company against Japaneseumilitary
censors.
The American box-selling firm
charged thatrcensors rad removed
magazines and books from its mail
arriving from America-publications
dealing with the Chinese-Japanese
war.
The company asked for the privil-
eg of having its mail come from the
Uhited States in diplomatic pouches.
Full Summer
Of Educational
AetivitycViewed
(Continued from Page 1)
outs for every performance with a
six-day presentation of Rudolf
Friml's, "The Vagabond King," pro-
duced in cooperation with the Music
School and the University Symphony
under the baton of Henry Bruinsma.
Still on the musical front, the Sum-
mer Session Director's Band and All-
High Clinic Band, numbering togeth-
er 200 musicians, presented the first
Michigan Band Festival before a
crowd of 9,000 townspeople and stu-
dents at Ferry Field. Victor J. Grabel,
director of the Chicago Land Festival
and intimate friend of the late John
Philip Sousa, and Prof. William D.
Revelli, director of the Michigan
bands, conducted the outdoor con-
cert, which climaxed a series of local
Sunday afternoon performances and
several radio broadcasts.
Top social activity of the season
was the reception for Summer Ses-
sion students and visiting faculty,
held in the Graduate School. More
than 2,000 people passed the receiv-
ing line, which was headed by Prof.
Louis A. Hopkins, director of the
Summer Session. Weekly dances were
held at the Union and the League
and bridge and dancing lessons were
given at the League.
Professor Hopkins gave the direc-
tor's greeting to students at the ini-
tial campus vesper held in the Gradu-
ate School Auditorium at which time
(Continued on Page 4)

Armstrong Annexes Third Title In An

Henry Armstrong added the lightweight boxing title to his collection by
15-round battle in Madison Square Garden in New York. Armstrong alr
welterweight championships. Ambers is shown here down for a count of e
anaugh is the referee.
Seven Killed As Three Naval Planes

abers Knockout
I
ry r
defeating Lou Ambers in a bruising
eady held the featherweight and
ight in the sixth round. Billy Kay-
Crash In Bay
r }
the causes of three airplane crashes
The wreckage of two of the planes
is the wreckage of a plane from
ed.
Americans have met they have light-
heartedly saluted as North American
friends, without thought of dangers
from overseas. Yet we are awake to
the knowledge that the casual as-
sumption of our greetings in earlier
times today must become a matter of
serious thought.
A few days ago a whisper, for-
tunately untrue, raced r-ound the
world that armies standing over
against each other in unhappy array
were to be set in motion. In a few
short hours the effect of that whi-
per had been registered in Montreal
and New York, in Ottawa and in
Washington, in Toronto and in Chi-
cago. Your business men and ours
felt it alike; your farmers and ours
heard it alike; your young men and
fromoveseas Ye we re waketo

HERBRT MAMAU
7h4fIBRU 4ASTOR
muoan
And
GENE RAYMOND
ANN SOTHERN
in
"SHE'S GOT EVERYTH ING"
With
VICTOR MOORE
BILLY GILBERT
-- COMING SUNDAY -
ROBERT TAYLOR
in
"THE CROWD ROARS"

strength of our men Ir-ve made us
Leading Figures In FDR Purge vital factors in World peace whether
... . ..,. .... we choose or not.

D. WORTH CLARK EUGENE TALMADGE
A New Deal opponent D. Worth Clark won Idaho Democratic sena-
torial nomination from Sen. James P. Pope, ardent New Dealer. The
President has come cut against the Georgia senatorial ambitions of
former Gov. Eugene Talmadge, called purveyor of "panaceas."

JOHN J. O'CONNOR JAMES H. FAY
Outspoken political opponent of the President is New York's Rep.
John J. O'Connor, chairman of powerful House Rules Committee. Oppos-
ing O'Connor for Democratic nomination will beJames H. Fay who
announced himself an unalterable Roosevelt supporter.

Two naval boards of investigation were appointed recently to determinei
which killed seven Navy fliers and injured four others near San Diego, Cal.
which crashed into San Diego Bay are shown here. On the barge platform
which the crew escaped and on the crane is a plane in which two were kill
FDR's Queens University Speech

O. D. JOHNSTON ELLISON 'COTTON ED' SMITH
"I don't believe a family can live on 50 cents a day," the President told
Greenville, S. C., crowd refuting claim reportedly made on the Senate
floor by Sen. Ellison "Cotton Ed" Smith, who seeks renomination.
South Carolina's Gov. O. D. Johnston also seeks nomination.

KINGSTON, Ont., Aug. 18.--IP)-
Here is the text of President Roose-
velt's address at Queens University
today:
To the pleasure of being once more
on Canadian soil where I have passed
so many of the happy hours of my
life, there is added today a very warm
sense of gratitude for being admitted
to the fellowship of this ancient and
famous university. I am glad to join
the brotherhood which Queens has
contributed and is contributing not
only to the spiritual leadership for
which the college was established, but
also to the social and public leader-
snip in the civilized life of Canada.
An American president is preclud-

Classified Directory

ed by our Constitution from accept-
ing any title from a foreign prince,
potentate, or power. Queens Univer-
sity is not a prince or a potentate but
it is a power. Yet I can say, without
constitutional reserve, that the ac-
ceptance of the title which you confer
on me today would raise no qualms
in the august breast of our own Su-
preme Court.
Civilization is not national-it is
international-even though that ob,
observation-trite to most of us, is
today challenged in some parts of the
world. Ideas are not limited by ter-
ritorial borders; they are the com-
mon inheritance of all free people.
Thought is not anchored in any land;
and the profit of education rebounds
to the equal benefit of the whole
world. That is one form of free trade
to which the leaders of every oppos-
ing political party can subscribe.
In a large sense we in the Americas
stand charged today with the main-
taining of that tradition. When,
speaking recently in a similar vein
in the Republic of Brazil, I included
the Dominion of Canada in the fel-
lowship of the Americas, our South
American neighbors gave hearty ac-
claim. We in the Americas know
the sorrow and the wreckage which
may follow if the ability of men to
understand each other is rooted out
from among the nations.
Many of us here today know from
experience that of all the devasta-
tions of war none is more tragic than
the destruction which it brings to the
processes of men's minds. Truth is
denied because. emotion pushes it
aside. Forebearance is succeeded by
bitterness. In that atmosphere hu-
man thought can not advance.
It is impossible to remember that
for years when Canadians and

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We in the Americas are no longer
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