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July 14, 1937 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1937-07-14

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 1937

Human Speech
Pitch Studied
ByLinguists
Cowan Uses Phonograph
Records And Pictures
In Illustrations
(Continued from Page 1)
is, Dr. Cowan used both phonograph
records and synchronized stereopti-
can pictures that revealed the range
and extent of pitch in sylabic, dissyl-
labic, and phrasal speech in English,
French and German. He pointed out
the little realized variability of pitch
In normal human discourse, showed
how some speech glides having a
wide tonal range occur so quickly that
they are below the threshold of hu-
man hearing and hence leave sound-
gaps for the hearer, and remarked
that what is really a vibrato tone,
such as a song note as uttered by
Lawrence Tibbet, is heard by the hu-
man ear as a monotone.
Chief interest in the subsequent
discussion concerned the usability of
Dr. Cowan's evidence to provide a
theory of the toneme, or minimal rec-
ognizable tone pattern, for speech and
particularly for English. It was sug-
gested by Prof. Edward Sapir of Yale.
University that even thou.gh the
available facts are of immediate in-
terest for the experimental phoneti-
cian only, yet it will be upon the basis
of these and similarly ascertained
data that the linguist must erect his
theory of the toneme when the time
comes for such interpretation.
Second of the week's Linguistic In-
stitute lectures will be that presented,
at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Prof. John
H. Muyskens of the department of1
speech, who will discuss "Speech and
Emergent Specificity." The meet-j
ing, which is open to the public, will
be in the lecture room of the Institute,
of Human Adjustments, 1007 E. Hu-I
ron Street.
System Of Pardons,
Paroles Is Praised
EAST LANSING, July 13.--(P)-1
Joel Moore, warden of the state prisonk
of southern Michigan, told a confer-t
ence of welfare workers today that1
the public is "needlessly alarmed"1
over the present pardons and parolest
system.
Speaking ,on the rehabilitation ofr
criminals, the warden told the socialr
workers that "paroles properly ad-
ministered are a valuable part of cor-
rectional procedure."
"The public is taking a lively in-
terest- in the processes of correc,
tional work," he said. "But they are
becoming needlessly alarmed about
the paroles and pardons system."

Sally Pierce Recalls
Amusing Incidents
(Continued from Page U
attaining a dramatic crescendo over
her priceless pearls, which played an
important part in the story, and just
as she reached the climax line, the
string broke and scattered the pearls
all over the stage. And there was the
time Jim Doll, as costume director for
"She Stoops to Conquer," covered
Sally's dress with weeks' old grease
paint to simulate mud and nauseated
the entire cast. "I had a cold," she
added, "so I didn't notice it myself."
But being an 'actress isn't all
comedy either, Sally pointed out, re-
calling times when the show had to
go on in spite of sickness that kept
her from every dress rehearsal, or a
toothache that made playing "Queen
Elizabeth" a torture. But even with
these occasional hardships, it's still
a lot of fun and the show can keep
going on forrquite a while before
Sally will be ready for her last black-
out.
Ralph Rush Praises
Features Of Clinic
For School Bands
The University of Michigan has
probably the best high school band
clinic set-up I have ever seen in my
experience, Ralph Rush, director of
the ClevelandaHeights,- high school
band, Cleveland Heights, O., and a
guest conductor in the present high
school band clinic, said yesterday.
"Michigan has the best set-up in
that it stresses both orchestra and
band work," he declared. "Northwest-
ern has just as good a clinic in band,
but it does not include much orches-
tra work."
Mr. Rush declared that the clinic
is the most helpful thing for school2
music that he has come in contact
with in that it gives many high school
directors a chance to get together.
"And at Michigan, they are way
ahead of the game," he stated.
"The band clinic has a big future,"
Mr. Rush said.
ROOSEVELT-LEWIS-1940
COLUMBUS, O., July 13.--(P)-
Rep. Gus Kasch of Akron, champion
bill-introducer of the Ohio House, al-
though none of his projects has ever
become law, . proposed a resolution
late today urging President Roosevelt
to accept nomination for a third term
with John L. Lewis as his running
mate.

War Guns Roar Once A gain In China

{ I .

I
--T

M A Nt' LI (1T TUT TO

I

1'1EiN M A I I vT
CITY HEARS ROAR PROVINCE
OF GUNS IN WEST
AS FIGHTING BEGINS,
--'- AMKWAN
/ PEIPING
FENGTAI
JAPANESE BASE "* k TSIN
OF OPERATIONS -
a TRUCKS SPEED
HOPEL TAPANESE TO
PROVINrE FIGHTING ZONE
1 ,
CHANTUNG
PROVINCE
4.1
1-ONAN 50,000 CHINESE
t PR OVINCE MOVE TO FRONT
NANKING.

Golf Championship
Play Starts Today
Seeded match play beginning to-
day will divide the field of 38 entries
into the championship and first
flights in the all-campus golf tourna-
ment, it was announced' yesterday by
Randolph W. Webster.
All results must be posted in the
Intramural Sports office by Monday.
Winners of this match play will be
entered in the championship flight
and losers in the first flight, with
champions to be decided in both.
Qualifying scorestmade yesterday
were the basis of the seeding.
Teachers Must

Fresh Air Campers Are Busy
DistributingCamp's Pos

ters

Fresh Air Campers were busy yes- financially underprivileged and so-
terday distributing about town about cially undernourished, are to be giv-
as original and unsual signs as it has en four weeks of camping this year
out at Patterson Lake. The camp is
ever seen. under the direction of George B. Al-
To create interest in the Tag Day der and 20 University students as
Friday and Saturday, the boys made counselors.

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Ab

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-11

This Associated Press map located the danger spots in the latest
Sino-Japanese dispute in China. While the Japanese hurried troops
from Tientsin, 50,000 Chinese troops from Honan province were being
moved northward to Peiping on the Hankow-Peiping railway.

Lead Full Lives
Says Educator
Hits Community Stopping j
Of The Personal Affairs
Of Pedagogues
Outlining the problems raised by
the 1936 Yearbook of the American
Association of School Adminstrators
Miss Bessie Gambrill of Yale Univer-
sity yesterday told a group in the
University high school auditorium
that teachers in order to develop the
full personal life of their pupils, must
lead a full personal life.
"The community must stop run-
ning the personal life of teachers,"
she said, "if they are to be the great-
est benefit to their pupils."
Other points in the yearbook that
were brought out by Miss Gambrill
were the necessity of recognizing the
child's out of school experiences, the
importance of early years for per-
sonality development, the necessity of
revaluation of the public school cur-
riculum and the necessity of finding
a socially accepted way for each child
to satisfy his basic needs.
Miss Gambrill described to her au-
dience the passing and evolving
school. The passing school, accord-
ing to Miss Gambrill, furnished the
2hild's mind with knowledge from
books only, and the evolving school
takes the whole child's life into con-
sideration.

their own signs, and made some of
the spelling that goes into them. But
they are determined to get $2,500 the
last two days this week, so that 160
other fellows may have four weeks in
camp after this contingent is back
home in Detroit, Hamtrack and Wy-
andotte.
The 60 campers who cover the cam-
pus Friday will be given a special
treat when the Michigan Theatre
will be host at a Laurel and Hardy
feature picture. The downtown busi-
ness district will be covered by the
boys on Saturday.
Two amplifying systems will be
used in the Tag Day drive. The fund
solicitations are made each spring
and summer to augment larger con-
tributions by friends of the camp.
Three hundred and twenty boys,

During the past 17 years, 6,000 boys
have enjoyed the privileges of the
camp. 1,400 boys have been taught
to swim here.
Aims of the Fresh Air Camp are:
better citizenship, development of
leadership, prevention of delinquincy,
community cooperation and integra-
tion, and happier, healthier young
citizens, according to Mr. Alder.
MORGAN TO SAIL
NEW YORK, July 13.-(o)-Fol-
lowing his old custom of visiting the
Scottish highlands for the grouse sea-
son, J. P. Morgan, financier, plans to
sail next week for the British Isles
aboard his yacht Corsair, associates
said today.

JULY

CLEARANCE

Golf Pairings
Following are the pairings for the
all-campus golf tournament:
Walt Welty vs. Ed Goggan
Al Aymond vs.. George Barrett
J. Kerzman vs. Larry Steiner
Frank Hulswit vs. Paul Bez
Ed Love vs. Stub Worley
Bill Slootmaker vs. James Brown
Charles Brown vs. Henry Homes
Bill Hunter vs. James Tracy
A. Graham vs. A. W. Sempliner
Al Plummer vs. Victor Gurto
J. H. Secrist vs. Tom McCann
Jack Curto vs. V. B. Kellett
Leon Seltzer vs. A. T. Ryan
E. L. Bracey vs. Larry Rinek
Sam Shepard vs. Ted Grace
Clarence Neuhaus vs. John Willson
Bill Davidson vs. I. W. Burr
D. R. Small vs. George Hansen

CJarr

Scores

Short

Vision Of Education
(Continued from Page 1
work of a child is sometimes low," he
said.
Professor Schorling spoke on the
individualization of instruction to-
day, and said that retardation does
not show up today the same as 20
years ago because of the aadaptation
of the schools to the child.
"In a group of children," he stat-
ed in closing, "we must take care of
the fast pupil as well as the slow one."

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