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July 25, 1937 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1937-07-25

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SUNDAY. JULY 25 1937

THE MTCIIAN .DAILY

(..y. .w .va a.aY 'v u-ai ro..l 'v . . -. y yy"Yf... 111.1. { I'1i 2 V.. '.[a'-.4 ."Y /:a i aw r

DAILY OFFICIAL
B ULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
interested in teachers' organizations
problems are invited to attend an
open meeting of the Local Chapter of
the Americal Federation of Teachers
at 8 p.m. Wednesday evening, July 28,
in Natural Science Auditorium. The
nature, objectives, Affiliations, and
functioning of the Federation will be
the subject of addresses and discus-
sion by state officers of the organiza-
tion and others.
C. N. Wenger, Pres.
Students, College of Literature, Sci-
ence and Arts: Students whose rec-
ords carry reports or I or X either
from last semester or (if they have
not been in residence since) from any
former session, will receive grade of
E unless the work is completed by
July 28. Petitions for extensions of
time, if approved by the instructors
concerned, should be addressed to the
Administrative Board of the College,
and presented in Room 4, University
Hall before July 28.
The Bureau has received notice of
the following civil service examina-
tions:
Senior educational analyst (tests
and measurements), $4,600 a year;
educational analyst (tests a n d
measurements), $3,800 a year; ex-
tension service, office of Cooperative
extension work, Department of Agri-
culture.
Field representative, $3,500 a year;
division of savings bonds, Treasury
Department.
Principal safety promotion adviser,
$5,600 a year; division of labor stan-
dards, Department of Labor.
Warden, $6,500, $5,600 and $4,600
a year and associate warden $5,600,
$4600 and $3,800 a year; U. S. Bu-
reau of Prisons, Department of Jus-
tice.
For further information, please call
at the office, 201 Mason Hall.
University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational In-
formation.
Unidentifiable mail is being held in
held in Room 1, University Hall, for
the following addresses: M. B. Boul-
ware, Julius Christensen, Prof. P. E.
Corbett, Dr. C. Garber, Jean Graham,
Lois Hayes, Margaret Jones, Carl J.
Lowell, Eva R. McCowen, E. S. Mur-
rell, J. M. Reese, Anna Wallace.
Major Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

22 Are Critically Hurt

When Bus Collides With Gas Truck

Four Negroes
Freed By Fast
Court Actions
Scottsboro Case Draws To
Close; Five Defendants
Remain Sentenced
DECATUR, Ala., July 24.-AP)-
Swift court action in the Scottsboro
mass rape case freed four Negroes}
and left five others under sentences
ranging from 20 years imprisonment
to death today.
Prosecutors agreed to dismissal of
charges against two who were "juv-
eniles" one who was ill and one who
was "practically blind" when posse-
men dragged nine negroes from a
freight train at Paint Rock, Ala.,
March 25, 1931.
The charges were assault in a gon-
dola car upon two white women mill
workers, Ruby Bates and Victoria
Price.

To Draw ,Up New Bill

Twenty-two persons were hurt when a bus loaded with New York city-bound commuters collided at New
York with a gasoline truck. The truck exploded and sprayed gasoline on the bus, which was soon reduced to
this wreckage.

science Builds Gun For Study
Of Very Remote Space Regions

Huge Robot Shoots Parts
Of Atoms At Other Small
Particles Of Matter
WASHINGTON, July 24.-(P)-It
looks like the head of a huge robot,
but it's a scientific billiard cue, a gun
to shoot protons, neutrons, electrons
and other fragments of atoms ca-
roming off other atoms at a speed of
hundreds of miles a minute.
The Carnegie Institution of Wash-
ington already has one-it generates
an electric current of a mere 1,200,-
000 volts. But the institution is com-
pleting another, a 55-foot monster
that really Will shoot. It will provide
5,000,000 v o I t ammunition f o r
scientists who are hunting such sec-
rets as "What is Life?" and "How is
matter constructed?"
In Effect, A Microscope
The new electric gun, which will
be completed in September at the in-
stitution's terrestrial magnetism lab-
oratory, is, in effect, a microscope
that can be focused on infinitesimal
specks.
"Its purpose is to study the regions
of space which are approximately as
remote from .ordinary dimensions in
the direction of minuteness as are
the farthest nebulae in the direction
of greatness," Dr. John A. Fleming,I
director of the laboratory, explains.
"These small regions are practically
equally inaccessible as regards de-
tailednexamination as are the most
distant nebulae."
Bombproof Study Hall
The new atomic observatory will
resemble an astronomical observa-
tory. It will have a pearshaped steel
dome 37 feet above the ground. The
"pear" will stand on its-small end
and its stem will be a 25-foot glass
vacuum tube extending into a con-
crete-lined, bombproof subterranean
chamber.
Inside the pear and surrounding
the tube will be dry air at a pressure
about twice that of an automobile
tire. Fragments of atoms will be
shot down the tube to collide in the
subterranean chamber with other
atoms.
In another underground chamber,
25 feet away, protected by concrete,
earth and water shielding, Carnegie
physicists will observe the angles and
speeds of particles as they bounce
in this scientific game of billiards.
This, according to Dr. Merle A.
Tuve, head of the atomic physics
staff, will make it possible to investi-

in treating cancer.
The Mortar Of Life
Physicists often envisage atoms asl
minute solar systems in which par-
ticles fly around a nucleus much as
the planets fly around the sun. Forces
similar to the gravitational attrac-1
tion that keeps the systems in place.
With their 1,200,000-volt gun, Car-
negie physicists recently discovered
within the atom a new "attractive
force" millions of times stronger
than the force of gravity. This force,
still unnamed, is the mortar that
holds the building blocks of matter
together andsmakes all things, in-
cluding life itself, possible.
Child's Press
Profits Owner;
OmitsAll Crime
NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y., July 24.
-(1P)-Three brothers are coining
money here with a journalistic toy.
Their monthly, tabloid newspaper
has 500 readers, gets more advertis-
ing than it can handle.
Earl Pettit, 16, editor, prints the
eight-page sheet on a home press,
cuts ads and headlines in linoleum.
He's earning money to go to col-
lege; wants to be a newspaper man.
His paper, now clearing $18 an is-
sue, was founded on this idea:
"The other papers were so full of
crime we decided to put out a sheet
that would give the people a laugh."
So the "Clarion" burlesques crime.'
A recent issue screamed "Vice" across
the front page, promised "Hot Stuff
Inside." It was filled with humorous
neighborhood gossip.
The business brains and columnist
is freckled David, 10. Journalism is a
passing fancy.
"I really want to be an aviator,"
David confides.
Richard, six, earns his cut as desk
man and press inker.
Editor Earl has a policy: Every now
and then he ribs the Niagara Falls
traction company.
Edmonson Is Sent
Letter Of Tribute
Tribute to the Schol oof Educa-
tion's Conference on Elementary Ed-

Sarazen, Smith
Tied For FirstC
In Tournament
Leaders Well Bunched Ast
Final 36-Hole Stretch Is'
Scheduled For Today 1
CHICAGO, July 24.-(AP)-Squire
Gene Sarazen of Brookfield Center,
Conn., and George Smith of Chicago,
a pair of well-established profes-
sionals, and Harry Adams of the
younger set, reached the halfway
post of Chicago's big money golfing
race today running head and head.
After another long day of touring
two sun-baked Medinah Country
Club courses, the trio shared the lead
at 144 strokes, but with plenty of
danger at their heels in the quest for
the $3,000 victor's share of the $10,-
000 purse. One stroke back were
Horton Smith, Ky Laffoon and Jim
Foulis of Chicago. Another lick far-
ther to the rear was Bud Williamson
of Fort Wayne, Ind.
National Open Champion Ralph
Guldahl, who suddenly warmed up
to a brilliant 71, after taking a 76
yesterday; Harry Cooper, who went
to the post favored to win the rich
pot; Henry ,Picard of Hershey, Pa.,
Charlie Penna of Chicago and Phil
Greenwald, young pro from Madison,
Wis., were only three strokes off the
leaders' pace at 147, with the 36-hole
stretch run coming up tomorrow.
Where T I
Theatre: Michigan: "The Singing
Marine," with Dick Powell; Majestic:
"The Hit Parade," with Frances Lang-
ford and Phil Regan; Wuerth; "Shall
We Dance," with Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers; Orpheum: "May-
time," with Nelson Eddy and Jean-
ette MacDonald and "Off to the
Vesper: Service and Carillon Con-
cert at 7:30 p.m.
Dancing: The Blue Lantern at
Island Lake and Bartlett's at Pleasant
Lake.

Nine Defendants AltogeTher
Of the five other'Negroes, four were
under sentence for rape after a series
of retrials and one, Ozie Powell, for
assault with intent to murder in
slashing a deputy sheriff with a knife
Jan. 22, 1936.
Twice returned to Alabama by the
United States Supreme Court, the
case left the prisoners in this status
today:
Clarence Norris, convicted for the
third time, death.
Andy Wright, convicted second
time, 99 years.
H e y w o o d Patterson, convicted
fourth time, 75 years.
Charlie Weems, convicted second
time, 75 years.
Ozie Powell, convicted once of rape,
who pleaded guilty to assault with in-
tent to murder, 20 years. The orig-
inal accusation against him was
dropped.
Freed after 612 years of jail life
and court appearances were the fol-
owing:
Olen Montgomery, once convicted
and sentenced to death.
Willie Roberson, once convicted
and sentenced to death.
Eugene Williams, once convicted
and sentenced to death.
Roy Wright, whose first trial ended
in a jury disagreement.
Convinced Of Guilt
Prosecutors issued a statement say-
ing they were "convinced beyond any
question of a doubt, after going
through eleven trials of the Scotts-
boro cases, that the defendants that
-lave been tried are guilty of raping
Victoria Price in the gondola car as
she recited upon the witness stand."
Samuel S. Leibowitz of New York,
stocky chief of defense counsel, had
challenged her story as "perjured" in
the retrial of Charlie Weems which
ended in conviction today.
The prosecutors said her testimony
"is corroborated by reputable wit-
nesses.
"But after careful consideration of
all the testimony, every lawyer con-
nected with the prosecution is con-
Tinced that the defendants Willie
Roberson and Olen Montgomery are
not guilty."
PLUNGES TO DEATH
DETROIT, July 24.--(P)--Bruce
Campbell, 45, San Diego, Calif.,
plunged to his death from the 10th
floor of a downtown hotel Saturday
morning. A companion said he was
unable to prevent him from leaping.

A substitute court bill dealing
only with the lower courts was as-
sured when the Senate Judiciary
committee instructed Sen. M. M.
Logan, (Dem., Ky.) to ask the Sen-
ate to recommit the controversial
Roosevelt measure. Senator Logan
is shown studying _the original
draft of the bill, dealing with the
Supreme Court.
England May Need
Additional Judges
LONDON, July 24.-(AP)-Liberal-
ization of England's divorce laws
made it probable today that more di-
vorce judges will be needed to handle
the impending flood of cases.
Regarded by the British press as
the biggest change in England's so-
cial laws in many years, the new di-
vorce measure led high court lawyers
to estimate they would have 50 per
cent more work to do after Jan. 1,
when the law becomes operative.
a 4

Calkins-Fletcher
KLEENEX

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Detroit. .......
Boston ............
Cleveland .........
Washington......
St. Louis ..........
Philadelphia.....

W.
55
52
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27
24

NATIONAL LEAGUE

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39
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TODAY'S GAMES
American
New York at Chicago.
Boston at Cleveland.
Washington at St. Louis.
Philadelphia at Detroit.
National
Chicago at New York.
St. Louis at Brooklyn (2).
Pittsburgh at Boston (2)
Cincinnati at Philadelphia

Save Money on
VACATION
CLOTHES

1 ., +: ,, +U,;- ,t , --;A her lkXioc I !

(2).

Schools Will Offer
Sex Hygiene Study
LANSING, July 22.-(A)-Dr. Eu-
gene B. Elliott, state superintendent
of public instruction, said today
Michigan's new law permitting sex
hygiene instructions in the public
schools would cause no radical cur-
ricular changes this year.
"The program is one to be evolved
slowly and painstakingly," he assert-
ed. "A commission probably will start
work next month to' draft sugges-
tions to the schools."
He made it clear that responsibility
for such teachings would rest with
the local school units, and that his
department would participate only in
a supervisory capacity, to lend its
advice and assistance when needed.
He predicted two years would be re-
quired to certificate all of the instruc-
tors needed. The law specifies they
must be doctors, nurses or public
health experts. He said motion pic-
tures supplied by the Federal gov-
ernment probably would be employed.
at least to some extent.
DEAN IS IN PRISON
JACKSON, July 24.-(P)-Dayton
Dean. Black Legion "trigger man,"

gate an unknown+ region of X-ray ucation this summer was paia y ivuss
radiation which may be found useful Eva Pinkston, secretary of the Na-
tional Department of Elementary
School Principals, in a recent letter to
Dean James B. Edmonson of the edu-'
Collection Of Chinese cation school.
Art To Be Moved Soon "The Conference on Elementary
Education was history making, and
The collection of Chinese art which its effects will be far reaching," the
has been on exhibit in Alumni Mem- letter said. "It's importance will grow
orial Hall will be removed Thursday, as the years pass."
according to Prof. Robert B. Hall, "Those atethe conference know that
director of the Institute of Far East- the success of this meeting was due
ern Studies, which has sponsored the to the splendid arrangements, whole-
exhibit. hearted cooperation and the help
The collection, which includes Ti- which you rendered in making the
betan temple paintings, Chinese silks plans. The 190 students who were1
and jewelry and other objets d'art of present have gone to their homes in
the Orient, is open to the public 32 states with a great love for the
daily from 2 to 6 p.m. TJniversity of Michigan." it continued.

I

Here are Values that
make you feel like going
places

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WILTLESS WONDERS are cool
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white non-crushable linen
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11

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Black, Navy, Brown SALYNAS and LINENS look cool on
the hottest day- from $4.95
KEEP COOL while traveling in Sheers with plain or print.
July Sale- from $7.00
SUMMER DANCE FROCKS- Values from $10.95
at 1/2 Price
SUMMER COATS for evening and daytime. July Sale-
from 3.95 to $10

r ,O
hhk1

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Can't Fail
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Staiionery

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FOR THAT PICNIC Culottes of air-conditioned. Cotton
at $2.50
OTHER COTTONS to $9.95.

QUEST
The positive deodor-
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'wa ;Ile+ rn'f . nf nn il 1oithe'wonder~ful "Buns."'

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