100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 11, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1934-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,

Educators Are
Told Problems
Of TVA Project
Dr. Reeves Gives Speech
On Social Work Being
Carried Out
(Continued from Page 1)
tion includes a statement which ex-
tends the scope of the Authority be-
yond building dams and developing
power and fertilizer. That section, he
emphasized, grants powers to the
President, however, and not to the
Authority which the act created.
All divisions of the Tennessee Val-
ley Authority are.working toward so-
cial and economic development for
the Valley, Dr. Reeves explained, lim-
iting his discussion, however, to cer-.
tain aspects of the program for which
he had been given personal adminis-
trative responsibility.
"Because of the serious situation
existing with reference to unempley-
ment, it seemed advisable to provide
some means of spreading employ-
ment," Dr.-Reeves stated. "To ac-
complish this purpose men working on
the, dams were placed on a thirty-
three hour working week, eachhman
working on a single shift of five and
one-half hours each day for six days
each week. While this plan assists in
solving the problem of unemployment,
it makes more difficult of solution
the problem of providing for the util-
ization of the leisure time of the
employees. This is aproblem which
arises. in connection with all con-
struction activities where large num-
bers of men are assembled together
away from their homes and families."
Discusses Leisure-Time Problem
Dr. Reeves discussed the program
under way to fill in leisure-time hours
of these workers, explaining the at-
tempts to reduce costs of the training
projects while at the same time mak-
ing them as effective as possible.
In his speech given before members
of the conference yesterday after-
noon, on the topic "Personal Selec-
tion and Management," Dr. Reeves
stressed the importance of the age-old
problem of finding the right man for
the right job. "This is especially true
in the case of an organization such
as the Tennessee Valley Authority,"
he said. "The many-sided nature of
the work to be done by the Authority
requires the services of men and
women of all types of abilities and
aptitudes. Personal and technical pro-,
ficiency adequate for the task to be
performed, combined with intelligent
loyalty to the ideals symbolized in
the objectives for which the Author-
ity was created, should characterize
every person who received appoint-
ment."
That careful, considered planning
is the practically inevitable solution
for Michigan education problems was
the conclusion drawn yesterday by
Prof. S. A. Courtis of the School of
Education, who spoke before the
morning session of the Education
Conference on the topic, "A Review
of the Goals of Public Education in
Michigan.
Criticizes "Demagogues"
Professor Courtis cited the Roose-I
velt Brain Trust as an outstanding
example of planning, and severely
criticized detractors of "brains in
government" as demagogues.
Most of his address was concerned
with the recent report of the Mich-
igan Educational Planning Commis-
sion, which, he said, was a non-par-
tisan and well-balanced body which
had proposed an outstanding program
for State education.
Professor Courtis analyzed the nine-
point program which the commission
has formulated, emphasizing that it

was in no sense mandatory upon local
school officials but purely suggestion.
The work of this commission, Pro-
fessor Courtis said, was to furnish
an adequate statement of the goals
of education in Michigan. He praised
the work of the commission, and
stated that members of its had done
an "intelligent" piece of planning for
future education problems.
Outlining a program for educa-
tional recovery for Michigan schools,
Dr. Eugene B. Elliott opened the eve-
ning meeting of the session.
"The effect of the depression on
the schools," according to Dr. Elliott,
"has been a reduced school term, the
curtailment of curricular offerings,
the reduction of supplies, the reduc-
tion of personnel and salaries, the
decrease of building maintenance, and
the elimination of capi'tal outlay ex-
penses."
Must Consider Taxation
Probably the most pressing and the
most important of sWhool needs is
financial reconstruction, the speaker
said. Continuing further, he empha-
sized that "since the school tax situa-
tion is very definitely related to the
entire tax structure of the state, the
whole taxation problem must be con-
sidered."
Dr. Elliott also pointed out the
necessity for reorganization of edu-
cational philosophy, and added that
--he Michigan Planning Commission
has developed a series of nine edu-
cational goals which, are designed
to reconstruct the goals and purposes
of education."

How Black Hills Bowl Will Appear To Balloonists

Tnis unusual picture shows how the Black Hills bowl near Rapid City, S. D., will appear at night as the
huge balloon of the projected stratosphere flight is inflated for its trip to the clouds. The natural bowl is
fringed with big lamps in preparation for the takeoff.

'Blues' Likely Causes Of Many
Accidents, Scientists Learn
PHILADELPHIA, July 10. - (IP) - 'ers were in this "low" emotional state.

1

Where To Go

An emotional period about once each
six weeks in which the male of the
human species is prone to accidents is
reported from the University of Penn-
sylvania industrial research depart-
ment.
The period lasts from two or three
days to a week. It is a time when a
man feels "low," worried, apprehen-
sive or slightly blue. It is a danger
signal largely overlooked.
These studies are reported by Rex
B. Hersey, assistant professor of in-
dustry and research associate. They
were made upon several hundred male
workers in the United States and
Germany.
In more than 400 minor accidents,
more than half occurred while work-
Regulation Of
Radio In Hands
Of New Board
Communication Commis-
sion To Start Unifying'
Program__Today
WASHINGTON, July 10. -(P)-
The nation will start the task of im-
posing unified regulation on the na-
tion's vast wire and wireless systems.
The new Federal communications
commission, with Eugene O. Sykes at
its head, will meet to organize its work
and absorb the old radio commission,
of which Sykes has been chairman.
One division of the new commis-
sion will plunge quickly into the rou-
tine of determining channels and
wave lengths and over tasks con-
nected with radio.
As for telephone and telegraph,
each of which will be under a division
of its own,'much ground must be
broken before any rate fixing or other
definite results are expected. Sykes
has said the machinery will be started
as promptly as possible, but broad
studies must come first.
Congress, in fact, charged the com-
mission to prepare a report by next
February looking to any changes that
need be made in the new legislation.
Former Dietitian Here
Takes Hawaiian Post
Neva E. Hirleman, formerly dieti-
tian of Betsy Barbour here, and now
employed as dietitian and director of
cafes at the Hotel Statler in Detroit,
will leave for Hawaii August 11 to be-
come director of the Senior Practice
Cottage and a teacher of home eco-
nomics at the Kamehameha School
for Girls there.
Miss Hirleman, who is a graduate
of Battle Creek College, is a member
of the American Dietetic Association
and the American Home Economic
Association. Before she came to Betsy
Barbour, she was dietitian at the Hal-
ger Hospital in Gallipolis, O.
GOLF MATCHES POSTPONED
Because of the Men's Education
Club picnic today at Portage Lake, the
scheduled golf match between teams
captained by Prof. Thomas Diamond
and Prof. Paul Washke has been
postponed until Friday. The two
teams will meet in their second match
on the first nine holes of the Univer-
sity Course; and play will begin at
4 p.m.

This is very "diagnostic," Professor
Hersey observes, because the total
group of workers was emotionally low
only 20 per cent of the time.
"Every male worker whom I have
studied both in this country and
abroad," the report states, "showed
the astounding fact that emotional
tone varies not only from time to time
during the day, but also, for no ac-
countable reason, seems to exhibit
longer recurrent fluctuations in emo-
tional states apparently characteris-
tic of the individual.
"These recurrent emotional fluctu-
ations in the workers studied in Amer-
ica averaged about five or six weeks
in length, the time span for two
men being only three weeks and for
another nine weeks.
German Span Shorter
"In Germany the average span was
at least a week shorter. Some of the
workers in Germany had a span as
short as 14 to 16 days.
"Once the average time of span
was discovered it was observed that
the fluctutions of each period around
that norm was no more than a week
-that is not more than a week
longer or shorter. The span of young-
er workers was shorter than of older
married workers, though this was not
as true in Germany as in the United
States."
In the reaction from these "lows"
when spirits rose too high there was
also danger. Under too great elation,
workers grew careless and had acci-
dents. The report estimates about
25 per cent of accidents occurring in
such "highs."
Happy Worker Safe
Lack of sleep, Professor Hersey re-
ported, as far as he had been able to
observe, "shows rather little effect
upon efficiency."
But it did lead to dangers of acci-
dent, for moments of dozing which
did not interfere with efficiency, were
danger spots for accidents.
"The happy worker," he finds, "is,
other things being equal, the safe
worker. At present I wish to stress
only three important items in achiev-
ing emotional balance. A man must
have one or more goals toward which
he is striving. He must feel he is
making progress or that his marking
time is temporary. He should also
feel he is doing something worth
while for someone in whose eyes he
wishes to stand well."
Vanguard Club
Will Hold First
'MeetingToniglit
Prof. Norman Nelson of the English
department will lead a discussion on
American Labor Under the NRA, with
particular reference to the strike sit-
uation, at a meeting of the Michigan
Vanguard Club to be held at 8 p.m.
tonight at the Michigan Union. The
forum will be open to the general
public.
Professor Nelson was a candidate
for Alderman on the Socialist Party
ticket in the last city election.
One of the purposes of tonight's
meeting is to complete a program of
weekly discussions on matters of im-
mediate interest. The program tonight
will open the series, and it is ex-
pected that similar programs will be
offered weekly throughout the sum-
mer.

Morning
9:30 - Conference on Apraisal and
Re-adjustment in Education (Michi-
gan Union).
Afternoon
12:45 - Excursion No. 4, The Ford
Plant. Meet on Angell Hall steps.
2:00 - Conference on Appraisal
and Re-adjustment in Education
(Michigan Union).
2:00 -Michigan Theatre, "Opera-
tor 13" with Marion Davies.
2:00 - Majestic Theatre, "Wharf
Angel" with Alison Skipworth.
2:00 - Wuerth Theatre, two fea-
tures. "Sho-Off" with Spencer Tracy
and "The Unknown Blonde" with
Dorothy Revere.
3:00 - Lecture, Reminiscences of
the Art of Acting, Francis Compton,
Guest Director (Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre).
4:00 -Same features at the three
theatres.
5:00 -L e c t u r e, Contemporary
American Painting (Illustrated), Pro-
fessor Bruce M. Donaldson.
Evening
7:00 - Same features at the three
theatres.
7:30 - First Band Concert of the
Summer Season will be given on the
steps in front of the University Li-
brary.
8:30 - "Both Your Houses," Mich-
igan Repertory Players, Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
Canoeing on the Huron every after-
noon and evening.
Dancing at the Blue Lantern Ball-
room, Island Lake.
BOX SCORE OF
I LAL-STAR GAME
NATIONALS

Michigan Grid
Stars Leading
In All-Star Poll
Bernard Leading Centers
In Newspaper Returns;
3 Others In Race
Michigan grid stars are leading in
the poll to pick a team of 1933 college
all-stars to meet the Chicago Bears,
national professional champions, on
Augusmt 31 at Soldiers' Field, Chicago,
according to figures released yester-
day in the first compilation of the
nationwide poll.
The poll is being conducted by the
Chicago Tribune and associated news-
papers and a squad of 27 men is to
be picked to go into training August
15. Each football fan is invited to se-
lect the eleven best gridders who end-
ed their college playing careers last
fall. Only those who ended their
play in 1933 are eligible.
The Tribune reports that Chuck!
Bernard, rangy Wolverine center on
the 1933 championship eleven and
almost unanimous choice for all-
American is leading all candidates for
the pivot position with 564 votes,
ahead of Ray Oen of Minnesota, who
has 184.
Ted Petoskey is tied with Joe Skla-
dany, of Pitt for the top in the vote
for ends, each having received 496
votes. Whitey Wistert, Michigan's,
All-American tackle, trails Moose
Krause of Notre Dame in the ballot
for the tackle position, Krause having
616 and Wistert 496.
Herman Everhardus, with Beattie
Feathers of Tennessee, is a leading
choice in the poll for halfbacks, with
a vote of 496. Feathers has 664 while
Nick Lucats of Notre Dame is third
choice with 240.
Cast Selected For
Both Your Houses'
(Continued fronVage 2)
ist, we are to see Mary Pray, who will
be remembered for her splendid per-
fdrmance as Amy in the first play of
this summer season.
Others in the cast of 16 players are
L. Wayne Smith, the Congressman
from California who is protecting the
interests of Hollywood; Frank Funk
as Eddie Wister, who "keeps house for
the steel lobby"; Charles Orr as Dell,
"the watch-dog of the Treasury";
Clarence Moore as Sneden, the golfer-
Congressman;* Eva Nelson, as Miss
McMurtry, the lady-Congressman;
Jay Pozz as McLe.n's double-crossing
secretary, Merton; Harlan Bloomer as
Ebner, the wild radical of Congress
and "a son and heir of a weak-minded
seven generations of boll-weevils, and
inch worms"; and Calvin Pettit as
Mark, the cocky office boy.

-Associated Press Photo
Rep. E. W. Marland (above) be-
came the Democratic nominee for
governor of Oklahoma when Tom
Anglin, backed by "Alfalfa Bill" Mur-
ray, withdrew from the democratic
run-off primary.
WHAT A FUTURE!
BORYSLAW, Poland, July 10 - (/P)
-A young wpan called on a fortune
teller Monday to find out what the
future held for him. He found out
quickly. A bomb in his pocket ex-
ploded, killing him and seriously in-
juring the fortune teller. There was
not enough of the victim left to
identifyhim-.

Oklahoma N~omniiee

SocialProjects
Betsy Barbour House and Jordan
Hall are continuing their summer
round of social activities this week.
Betsy Barbour House is having a par-
ty tonight for the International Law
group that is here on the campus and
Jordan Hall is having a Faculty Din-
ner Thursday night.
The party for the International Law
Group will consist of a buffet supper,
which will be served in the dining
room and on the porch.
Guests at the Faculty Dinner at
Jordan Hall will be Prof. and Mrs.
C. L. Meader, Dr. and Mrs. Ralph
Smith, Dean and Mrs. Wilbur Hum-
phreys, Dr. and Mrs. D. 0. Davis,
Prof. and Mrs. Maurice Tiley, Pro-
fessor and Mrs. John L. Brumm,
Prof. and Mrs. Rene Talamon, Prof.
and Mrs. William Smeaton, Dr. Bar-
bara Bartlett, and Dr. Mabel E. Ru-
gen.
Tennis Tournament
Will Begin Today
Play in the Intramural summer ten-
nis tournament will begin today with
54 entered. Although Nicholas Polites,
1933 winner is not entered, C. Cole-
man, Law, who was a runner-up in
the 1932 tourney, is a favorite.
Thirty-two have entered the golf
singles tournament, play in which
will begin Monday, July 16. Donald
Kipp, winner last summer, will not
defend his title.

'Barbour, Jordan
Halls Continue

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY1

LAUNDRY

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISINC
P'hone 2-1114. Place adr is ements with
clavsified Advertising Department.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box Numbers nay be secured at no
extra chiarge.
Cash in Advance -1c per reading line
ton basis of fiveaverage words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
Minimum three lines per insertion.
days from the date of last insertion.j
Minximum three lines per' insertion.
By Contract, per line-2 lines daily, one
month.................8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months .8c
2 lines daily, college year ... 7c
4 lines E.O.D., colt(ege( year . .7c
1~00 lines used_ as dedred .... 9c
300 lines used as desired ... 8c
1,000 lines used as desired ....7c
2,000 lines used as desired ... 6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch
of 7? ' point ionic type, upper and lower
case. Add 6e per line to above rates for
all capital letters. Add 6c per line to
above for bold face, upper and lqwer
case. Add 10c per line to above rates
for bold face capital letters.
Telephone Rate--15c per reading line
for one or two insertiont.
10, diseount if paid within ten
more insertions.

LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
STUDENT and family laundry. Good
rain water. Will call for and de-
liver. Telephone 4863. -31
NOTICE
TYPING
Eight Cents A Page
PHONE 2-1214 and
Leave Your Number, or
Come to Student Publications Bldg.
WANTED
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main. 2x
LOST
BLACK Schaeffer pen, Friday be-
tween Church and E. Univ., near
High School. Name'.RuthCowen.
Reward. Phone 7037. 30

--. , 1

A

woRLD

AB
Frisch, 2b......3
*W. Herman, 2b 2

Traynor, 3b
Medwick, lf
Klein, if ...
Cuyler, rf . .
Ott, rf ....
Berger, cf . .
P. Waner, cf
Terry, lb ..
Jackson, ss .
Vaughan, ss
Hartnett, c .
Lopez, c ....
Hubbell, p ..
Warnecke, p
Mungo, p ..
*Martin, If
J. Dean, p ..

. . ..5
....2
. .. . 3
. .. .2
. . .. 2
.. .. 2 .
... .2
. .. .3
...2
. ...2
. ...2
. .. . 2
. . ..0
. ..0
....0
.:. ..0
. . ..1

RIHTB
3 2 -5
0 1 2
2 2 2
1 1 4
0 1 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 1 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
1 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
7 8 15

PO
0
0
1
0
1
2
0
0
1
4
0
4
9
7
0
0
0
0
0
0
27

A
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
5

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

Frankhouse, p ..1
Totals ....36

AMERICANS

AB
Gehringer, 2b ..3
Manush, if.....2
Ruffing, p.....1
Harder, p......2
Ruth, rf.......2
Chapman, rf ..2
Gehrig, lb.....4
Foxx, 3b.......5
Simmons, cf-If .5
Cronin, ss ......5
Dickey, c .......2
Cochrane, c ....1
Gomez, p ......1
Averill, cf ......4
West, cf........0

R
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
3
1
1
0
0
1
0

H TB
2 2
0 0
1 1
0 0
0 10
1 3
0 0
2 3
3 5
2 3
1 1
0 0
0 0
2 5

PO
2
0
0
1
0
0
11
1
3
2
4
1
0
1

A
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
0
8
0
1
0
0

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

HISTORY
Day byDa
/a
"rowsIl

M

00o100 o

Totals ....39 9 14 24 27 14 1

*Batted for
played second

Hubbell in third and
for Frisch later.

I

**Batted for Mungo in fifth.

,
.

I

I I

I

U UU mwm Um

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan