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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 06, 1934 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1934-07-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

we support the movement toward placing more
economic power in the hands of Uncle Sam, the
present attempt to centralize police forces is a
different problem. The danger is that the power
might be used as it is now being used in Germany,
to forcibly maintain the capitalist-industrial sys-
tem, or, more specifically, to suppress labor.
Let the reform movements, then, turn their at-
tention to state and local agencies. The citizens
can better understand and have more influence
upon a decentralized system, because with it they
are more intimately related.
r The Theare

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By BRACKLEY SHAW
The powers that be made no mistake when they
got Francis Compton here to direct the summer i
plays if only to let him play the title role in1
"Grumpy." Mr. Compton is an excellent actor who,
can take any type of part and do it well, but he
is at his best as a crotchety old man. In fact, a
grumpy old man.
The story is a detective story in which the sleuth
is an octogenarian retired criminal lawyer, out-
wardly choleric, but only outwardly. His young
grand-nephew comes to visit his country home
carrying with him a valuable diamond. During the
night the diamond is stolen by person or persons
unknown. The old man takes upon himself the
investigation of the robbery so that the young man
will be reinstated in his firm and will be able to
marry Grumpy's grand-daughter. And a grand
job of detecting he does.
Mr. Compton's support in this play is not good.
George Totten as Ruddock does a convincing job
as Grumpy's valet and constant companion who
accompanies him on his trip to London and puts
him to bed every night. Barbara Van Der Vort as
Virginia Bullevant, Grumpy's grand-daughter, lived
up to expectations. She was charming as the dutiful
grand-daughter. That completes the list of success-
ful characterizations. Blandina Foster as Mrs.
McClaren seemed to be in a hurry to get her
lines over and get off the stage. Gertrude Roe as
Susan, the maid, needs to practice restraint; she
overplays the part. Charles Harrell- as Ernest, the
man who lost the diamond, has improved greatly
since he first started with Play Production but he
is still jerky and unsure of himself. In the role of
Mr. Valentine Wolfe, dealer in "antiques,'.' Paul
Sultzbach had a great deal of trouble attempting
to reconcile educated diction with criminal slang.
It obviously hurt him to say "ain't." And won't
James Doll ever graduate?
It must be realized, of course, that this is the
first play of the season in which the students
of the summer courses in Play Production have
had any roles. It is to be hoped that under Mr.
Compton's direction they will improve during the
summer.
The play moved rapidly, thanks to the direction,
never lagging as it might easily have. Fortunately
the whole play centers around the character of
Grumpy and Mr. Compton fills that role so beau-
tifully that the performance is good entertain-
ment.
Screen Reflections
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good; one star just another picture;
no stars keep away from it.
AT THE MICHIGAN
"SUCH WOMEN ARE DANGEROUS"
Michael Shawn .......... Warner Baxter
Helen Hallock ......,.... Rosemary Ames
Verne Little ...........Rochelle Hudson
Wanda Paris ..............Mona Barrie
We went to this show with, the vague premoni-
tion that we would not enjoy it. The advance no-
tices frightened us. Of course we like Warner Bax-
ter, and think Rochelle Hudson is pretty, in a
naive way, but the vehicle didn't sound at all en-
couraging.
We knew it concerned a handsome bachelor-
novelist, idolized by a flock of women who read
behind the lines of his love stories and see his soul,
naked before them. We've seen it done so often
before on the screen. The author is always hand-
some, a bit addicted to drink, and so bored by it all.
These shows have been responsible for the pop-
ular conception that all writers are romantic -
that lovely ladies grovel at their feet - and that
they do nothing but make personal appearances
and autograph books. When one stops to think of
it, this is absurd. Most successful authors (we don't
mean the bohemians) are very normal individuals
with wives, children and all that. They, oftener
than not, wear glasses and are bald-headed, work
diligently during the day, and play bridge with the
Joneses at night.
But for screen purposes he would never do. He is
much too prosaic. He lacks glamour.
But Warner Baxter has it, and so he makes a
very convincing screen-author. Three women are
In love with him - his secretary (Rosemary Ames),
the woman next door (Mona Barrie), and the
struggling young writer (Rochelle Hudson).

He is in love with the woman next door, but
it develops that she has a jealous husband and
a six-year-old child. This comes as quite a shock
to Mr. Baxter.
The struggling young writer is, madly in love
with him. But her love is unrequited. So the S.Y.W.
kills herself.
Things are greatly complicated by the entrance
of the Law. Mr. Baxter is suspected of murdering
the S.Y.W. Circumstances are strongly against
him. Just as the judge is about to sentence him to
death, his secretary steps in with evidence that
saves him. Just like that he realizes that he has
been in love with her all along -so he marries]
her. Which action brings down the curtain and
everybody is happy.
It's really quite entertaining. Mr. Baxter's fan
mail should increase immensely. The Misses Ames.

igan and Majestic. Just as an example, the two
Chic Sale shorts, "Little Fellow," and "Old Shep"
which have been shown at the -Michigan in the
last week or so. Reeking with bathos, these sloppy
attempts at sentiment are so overdrawn that it is
quite impossible to let down your hair and have a
good cry. A little honest sentiment is all right but
it is best handled in a restrained fashion with a
deft touch. These shorts, however, ring the changes
on every possible pathetic angle of the situation.
They are, in short, sickening. If they can't get
anything better than this it would be better to
leave the screen blank for five minutes.
Also a word for Mr. Paul Tompkins. Would it
be too much trouble to transpose the music that
you play on your organ to bring it down about
two or three notes into an ordinary singing range?
Most men are baritones and the way the music
is pitched now it requires either a high tenor or
bass. In the same manner, most women are mezzo-
sopranos and to sing to your playing they have
,to be either coloratura-sopranos or contraltos.
Please bring it down where we can all sing.
C sIEsC
By THE SUMMER OBSERVER
TRAYS
Watch them come off the "ring" at the League
cafeteria. Slowly, solemnly the summer students
swing their trays around by the cashier's place.
There is on the average one man to every fifteen
women.
Here is a man with a tie which resembles hol-
landaise sauce over broccoli. He nods to the cashier
upon hearing how much his meal is, and then
swoop, the tie licks the watermelon. Grandly he
carries it, shoulder high, to a table.
A woman is next, fussing, nervous because her
pile of books keeps falling over into the mashed
potatoes.. She frowns and is bumped by the person
in back of her. Carefully she lifts her tray, gin-
gerly she walks. She sees a friend and consterna-
tion is doubled. One, two, three steps, and the books
take a nice mouthful of mashed potatoes. The
friend waits. The tray carrier scowls.
Next off the ring is the liquid drinker. She is
with ail array of tomato juice, ice tea, water, and a
piece of mellon, honey-dew. Her work is practiced.
A summary glance over the room and "up-ze-
daisy." The liquids sail through the air. Perfectly,
she sets her tray down after a good little run to-
ward the window which reminds one of the busy
teacher. No doubt she has had practice in carrying
trays "at home." .
Next, the weary dreamer.- Or is .it the heat?
Whatever it is, she moves slowly, gazing absently
into her glass of water. Lifting the tray at last she
wavers, wanders among the tables, then vacantly
begins to empty her tray. A bus boy appears. She
smiles!
And soon a companion joins her. Neither talk
The companion watches intently as the bus boys
carry loads of dishes into the kitchens. Not a
word, until finally: "It is life," she murmurs.
"Hum?"
"The tray of food, that is life. Full. Life-giving
The dishes remain. The young men carry thenr
out, empty, to be washed so that they may be usec
again. A fertile circle. Round and round. Anc
these young men, they are helped too. I am tolk
they get money for their work!

Excursion No. 3: The Cranbrook
Schools: Leaving from in front of An-
gell Hall, Saturday, July 7, 8:00 a.m.
and returning at 3:00 p.m. Inspec-
tion of the five schools of the Cran-
brook Foundation, Bloomfield Hills,
Christ Church. and the carillon.
Round trip by special bus. Reserva-
tions in Summer Session Office, An-
gell Hall. Total expenses about $1.50.
The Regents, at their meeting Sep-
tember 25, 1931, established a stand-
ing committee of office personnel con-
sisting of two vice-presidents, Messrs.
Smith and Yoakum, and Mr. H. G.
Watkins, Assistant Secretary, as
"standing" members with the addi-
tion, in each individual case to be
considered, of the Dean or other di-
visional head concerned. This com-
mittee functions in all the customary
respects of a personnel office. Its ad-
vice will be had before the Regents!
make any appointments, promotions,
or salary changes within any of the
various clerical, stenographic, secre-
tarial, and secretarial-administrative
positions through the entire univer-
sity, in any capacity. The Chairman
of the Personnel Committee is Dr.
C. S. Yoakum, and the secretary is
Miss Alice Twamley, whose office is
Room 202, University Hall, Phone
Campus Exchange 81.
School of Education: Changes of
elections: No course may be elected
for credit after Saturday, July 7; no
course may be dropped without pen-
alty after Saturday, July 21. Any
change of elections of students en-
rolled in this school must be reported
at the Registrar's Office, Room 4
University Hall. This includes any
change of sections or instructors.
Membership in a class does not cease
nor begin until all changes have been
thus officially registered. Arrange-
ments made with instructors only are
tot official changes.
C. 0. Davis, Sec'y.
All signing-out slips from under-
graduate approved houses for women
studentsiaredue in the Undergrad-
uate offices of the Michigan League
every Monday by 5 o'clock.
Maxine Maynard, Pres.,
the Michiga.n League.
University High School Demonstra-
tionAssembly: The first demonstra-
ATTEND MICI
hCOOL MATINEESD. . . o
s Dashing, Debonair
4it vel, fha d;1Pit f

tion assembly of the University High
Sschool summer session will be given
at eleven o'cloc kthis morning in the
high school auditorium. The program]
will consist of a playlet, written by
the pupils and teachers of the Eng-
lish department, demonstrating the
uses of the 1ibrary. One feature of
the program will be the introduction
of several of the characters from
Bookland. All Summer Session stu-
dents who are interested are welcome
to attend the assembly.
University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information:
Students are reminded that Friday,
July 6th, is the last day on which
registration blanks may be taken
without charge. After this date there
will be a late registration fee of
$1.00. Office hours 9 to 12, and 2 to
4. 201 Mason Hall.
College of L.S.&A., Changes of Elec-
tions: No course may be elected for
credit after July 7; no course may be
dropped without penalty after July
21. Any change of elections of stu-
dents in this college must be reported
to Room 4, U.H. Membership in a
class does not cease nor begin until
the change has thus been officially
registered. Arrangements made with
instructors only are not official
changes.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information: The
Bureau has received announcements
of the following Civil Service exam-
inations:
Junior Agricultural Statistician, 2,-
000 to $2,600.
Associate Veterinarian (Diseases
affecting Wild Animal Life) $3,200.
For further information, kindly call
at the Bureau, 201 Mason Hall.
Saginaw Forest, on West Liberty
Road, will be open to the public every
Sunday during the summer unless
f. LEARN
TO DANCE
Social Dancing taught
aily. Terrace Garden
ancing Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the Summer Session office until 3:30; 11.30
Saturday.

existing conditions should make it in-
expedient.
N. L. Munster,
Forest Manager.
Summer School students desiring to
join conducted groups to special ex-
hibits in Museum please register at
Summer Session office by Saturday,
July 7.
Crystal Thompson, Curator
Department of Visual Education
Reading Requirements in German
for Ph.D. Candidates: Candidates in
all fields except those of the natural
sciences and mathematics must ob-
tain the official certification of an
adequate reading knowledge of Ger-
man by submitting to a written ex-
amination given by a Committee of
the Department of German.
For the summer session this ex-
amination will be given on Wednes-
day, Aug.. 8, at 2 p.m. in Room 203
U.H. Students who intend to take
the examination are requested to reg-
ister their names at least one week be-
fore the date of the examination at
the office of the German Department,
204 University Hall, where detailed
information with regard to examina-
tion requirements will be given.
Michigan League Hostesses: The
following have been chosen to act as
hostesses, this evening, at the Mich-
igan League:
Jean Seeley
Maxine Maynard
Margaret Kimball
Jane Fletcher
Charlotte Whitman
Betty Aigler
Mary Morrison
Virginia Randolph
(Continued on j1age 3)
BLUE LANTERN BALLROOM
EDDIE BOB
LAUGHTON & WOODRUFF
40c and their music 40c
l Dancing Nightly ExcBpt Monday
On Grand River, East of Brighton

We

Offer---

j

ATTEND
H IGAN * . . .COOL MATINEES
WARNER BAXTER
n avhe as ever plaed

i

Campus Opinion.
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregarded.
Thenames of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked to be brief, confining themselves to less
than 500 words if possible.
SOCIAL PROGRESS IN
COMMUNITY RELIGION
To the Editor:
Your caption set over the address by Dr. Edward
Blakeman in the issue of July 3rd does not
represent the emphasis at all. As a member of the
small seminar I wish to set forth the emphasis
given by the speaker: He stressed "what critics
of religion first see from a social view" and then
stated all the "debits" - faulty church structure in
protestantism, duplication with heavy debts, hos-
pitals by separate denominations, social agencies
kept up by denominations, etc.
The speaker then went on to show how to under-
stand these maladjustments - commended
churches for being able to build in each denomina-
tion a world-wide fellowship of worship, symbolism,
music, etc. He pointed out that the Catholics,
however divisive the parochial school may look,
have two important factors: (1) Catholics think
enough of religious teaching to face the world
in its behalf and (2) Catholics, as they claim, doub-
ly tax themselves to supplement the education of
the state.
Dr. Blakeman brought to the seminar four mag-
azines to show that the Federal Council of
Churches is moving the bodies away from faulty
separate social usages, that in religious education
there are such constructive plans as the Week-
Day Religious Schools, that literature by the Jews
and by the Catholics run parallel to Protestant
literature and inter-faith conferences are pop-
ular.
The argument the speaker was making was that
we need to distinguish between "social structure of
church units" and "religion, itself." He stated that
"sectarianism" is what the courts condemn. Courts,
on the other hand, uphold "religion." This left
with us a hope for solution of the problems
raised.
In his listing of the credit side of the ledger he
enumerated, in addition to what was reported:
Religion stands for "Unity with God the father of
the human family" - that "Love is a cardinal
principle in Judaism and Christianity as well as in
certain eastern faiths" - that worship goes on in

tn a ro e t ati s a f)erent from ar yIrteJ ,,3"''i y ,
"SUCH WOMEN ARE DANGEROUS"
MAJESTIC ........
ENDS TONIGHT
HELEN TWELVETREES
"ALL MEN ARE ENEMIES"
TOMORROW
GEORGE BURNS and GRACIE ALLEN
"MANY HAPPY RETURNS"
with Guy Lombardo and His Orchestra
Matinees 15c . . . . W U E RT H. . . . . Nights 25c
-A Double Feature Program-
VICTOR McLAGLEN RICHARD BARTHELMESS'
EDMUND LO/E ANN-DVORAK
"No More Women" "MASSACRE"
VO 0k Ih .

II

What PREKET-ES
SUGAR BOWL I#s--0
A PLACE OF INDIVIDUALITY
AND DISTINCTION"

$2.00 Prophylactic
HAIR BRUSHES
98c
A full, long, imported bristle
Genuine Leather
BILL FOLDS
49c u
Large Coke
WOODBU RY SOAP
3 for 25c
Dr. West
TOOTH BRUSH
(Economy)
Guaranteed
ELECTRIC FANS
$1.49
Full 8-inch blades
HOUBIGANT
BATH POWDER
SPECIAL
$100
260 SHEET
Hazeloin
FACIAL TISSUES
29C
PASTEL SHADES
Heavy Gold Plated
GILLETTE RAZOR
49kc
5 blades free
UN IVEX CAMERA
39c
FILMS 10c
EXPERT PRINTING AND
DEVELOPING

COMPLETE FOUNTAIN
TOASTED SANDWICHES

REGULAR MEALS
J U ICY STEA KS

LUNCHES
FROG LEGS

FISH

SALADS

DRAUGHT BEER

BOTTLED BEER (ALL KINDS)

""11

HOME-MADE CANDY

4,

Beer and Wine to take
off the premises sold
until 2:00 A.M.
3 Bottles for a Quarter

"Anything served
is of the Choicest
Brand"

PROMPT SERVICE
,Calk-ins-
f Ir parrh

These can be obtained at the SUGAR BOWL at all hours.

11 11

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