100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 04, 1934 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1934-07-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Uiiiii

WE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Official Publication of the Summer Session

..., ;
. 7
16

A"

I An

versity political science department, is published
as a supplement of the "national municipal re-
view."
Costs of printing the same number of ballots
varys greatly from county to county, the study
shows. One county, printing 5,800 ballots, paid
$110, while another, with 5,000, paid $351. Similarly
some counties print and pay for far more ballots
than they can reasonably expect to use. Cgnpeti-
tive bidding is recommended as a remedy, with
the possibility that the Secretary of State print
ballots for districts where all bids seem excessive.
Elimination of the party problems now appearing
on Michigan ballots and reducing the number of
elective officers to a minimum, by law and con-
stitutional amendment, would also cut the size
of the ballot with greater convenience to voters
and reduced cost. The report recommends voting
machines for election economy, speed and accu-
racy.

I

men who used the courts, refusing to surrender
their courts when needed. The remedy applied
would seem to be far out of proportion to the'
evil to be cured. Little annoyances such as thisI
regulation, which followed in the wake of the!
auto ban, should be made less onerous if pos-
sible, especially during the summer months.
-L. G. Davidson.

r-

r ___t_ ___ __ t.___. .L_ 1 . __, ___.1 .. ._ ___ 1.. ...1

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
oCiatEd F olt __t______
=~ 1933 NawJ 19-4
MEMBER OF THE .ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it
or not otherwise credited in this paper and the local
news published herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann- Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.25; by mail,
$t:50. During regular school year by carrier, $375 by
mail, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boyiston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Phone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ...........,....E. JEROME PETTIT
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR ....BRACKLEY SHAW
WOMEN'S EDITOR.............ELEANOR. JOHNSON
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Charles A. Baird, Clinton B. Con-
ger, Paul J. Elliott, Thomas E. Groehn, Thomas H.
Kleene, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch.'
REPORTERS: Barbara Bates, C. H. Beukema, Frances
English, Elsie Pierce, Virginia Scott, Edgar H. Eckert,
Bernard H. Fried.
BUSINESS STAFF
Office Hours: 9-12, 1-5 Phone 2-1214
BUSINESS.MANAGER ........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
ASST. BUSINESS MANAGER ......W. GRAFTON SHARP
ClrCULATION MANAGER .......CLINTON B. CONGER

I

/

1-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the Summer Session office until 3:30; 11:30
Saturday.

Encouragin Note
or Teachers. . .bs
NOTHER INDICATION that busi-
-A ness is on the upturn, for teachers
at least, is found in a recent report of the Univer-
sity of Michigan Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information which states that dur-
ing the first three months of 1934 there were
twice as many calls for teachers than in the
same period for 1933. The survey also shows
that a number of schools are restoring salaries and
returning to the ten-month teaching year.
The upturn in teacher demand, according to
Dr. T. Luther Purdom, director, seems to be due
to varied causes. Some communities have more
money available. Others are seeking new and bet-
ter trained instructors instead of rehiring the less
desirable ones released during the depression. One
school, he reports, will hire 25 per cent of its staff
new next fall because improved business condi-
tions are permitting faculty marriages heretofore
delayed by financial difficulties.
"Beginning salaries are apparently about the
same as last year," Dr. Purdom finds, "but pro-
* motion chances seem to be much better because
institutions employing new teachers are searching
for the best trained people suited to hold a par-
ticular position. If these teachers live up to expec-
tations, their training an; background insures
more immediate recognition."
Teachers are still being asked to instruct in
from two to five subjects, but the outlook justifies
"moderate optimism" and a continuation of pres-
ent trends for another year would mean "a very
radical improvement in teacher employment."
Political Sense
Of Humor . .
HE UNITED STATES have never
justly prided themselves on the
quality of their state politicians, yet they have
always been able to be amused by the calibre of
the political antics within the various states. With
the advent of fall elections to the seventy-fourth
Congress, voters can at last find an opportunity
to exercise a sense of political humor which has
long remained dormant through depression years.
To the candidates themselves there is nothing
enigmatic about the caustic drama of government.
The one opines that the dilemma of the electorate
was solved nationally in Novembpr, 1932. He will
drone us into ecstasy with "alphabet soup" and
newer deals. The voter will be kindly apprised that
chaos was averted, disaster staved off, economic
death and political malady healed by a Roose-
veltian shuffle of the cards. So sufficiently spell-
bound will the electorate be at the receipt of this
discerning news that all will promptly look into
their pockets for prosperity dollars.
A glance at the soap box across the street will
offer the candidate dressed in the letter of
the Constitution, who, preferring his soup un-
alphabetized, can foresee nothing but "pink" poli-
ticians striving toward increased debts and worth-
less money, with a possible dictatorship or two
for best measure. We must throw out the radicals,
he cries, or look for dark deception and ruinous
years to follow.
The voter may smile, look over the entire scene,
and smile again. He has found his sense of humor.,
Report Shows State
Elections Costly. .
A LTHOUGH the permanent regis-
tration of voters, mandatory in

Fewer elective officers, serving longer terms I
would make possible a minimumof two elections
a year and do away with costly special elections,
the committee suggests.
The number and payment of precinct officers
should be defined by State law, to curb excesses
in some counties. Pay for such officials ranges
from 20 cents an hour to $15 a day, with little
regard to the number of voters handled, the survey
shows. One township, with only 54 voters, was
found to be employing seven officials at $7 a
day.
Too many precincts and townships are exceeding
the legal limit of 650 voters, where ballots are
used, or 800 where machines are used, the report
states. Some precincts contain 2,000 registered
voters, a condition which causes long waiting and
discourages attendance at the polls. On the other
hand, some precincts are so small that secret voting
is almost impossible. Approximately a third of the
polling places have too few booths and many are
equipped with ballot boxes 30 years old and of a
type which make inaccuracy and fraud ps-
sible
County clerks should be given power to supervise
all elections within their counties, empowering
them to request regular reports on registration,
costs and other information from township and
other election officers. In this way the Secretary
of State could get this data from the clerks in
complete form and plan economical election man
agement, the committee believes.
"Nothing is more vital in a democracy than
honest and efficient elections," the report states.
"Fortunately, this survey 'has not uncovered many
instances of corruption, and it is quite clear that
Michigan is relatively free from the grosser forms
of election irregularity. Nevertheless, the investiga-
,tion of the conduct of elections in Michigan points
unmistakably to the necessity of taking effective
and prompt action to eliminate inefficiencies and to
reduce the present high costs."
Income Tax
Opposition. . .
THERE MAY BE good arguments
against a stiffer income tax, but
the charge that it would eliminate the incentive
for expending extra effort and the profitable use
of business genius is not one of them.
The concentration of those opposed to the tax on
these grounds is that the high graduated tax on
incomes will bring into operation the economic
law of diminishing returns. With an increasing
rate a point will be reached where the amount of
effort added will not result in an equal return, and
the incentive inspiring initiative energy auto-
matically disappears.
Such reasoning ignores the human trait that
causes a man ever to desire more, the characteristic
that keeps him from being satisfied as long as
there is a possibility of getting more worldly goods.
As long as the tax is not graded so drastically as
to mean ultimate cessation of earning power, it is
just as easy to believe that the average man will
redouble hi efforts when the tax begins to cut into
his income, as it is to suppose that he will become
discouraged and accept that point as his capital ac-
cumulating limit.
Were we to admit that such a tax would take
away the incentive for expending greater efforts,
that still would not be a strong argument against
the high income tax. The law of diminishing re-
turns would not begin to operate until a fairly
uarge fortune had been built up, and there is a
serious question of the need of further efforts to-
ward expanding that fortune. This country has
been developed to a point where it is no longer im-
portant that great wealth be concentrated in the
hands of an individual for the proper develop-
ment of an industry. In its natural state, rich
in resources and pregnant with possibilities for
exploitation, America needed its Fords, Morgans
and Rockefellers, but its great veins of potential
wealth have been tapped now.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregarded.
The naves of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked to be brief, confining themselves to less

than 500 words if possible.
To The Editor:
' Now that the summer session is under way and
there have been the usual number of self-congrat-
ulatory editorials and articles regarding the ad-
vantages of the university and Ann Arbor as an
educational and vacation center, it might be
well to take stock of the situation from the stand-
point of sporting facilities, especially as regards
the regulations at Palmer Field.
While the rules may have been necessary during
the school year, they would seem to be much too
stringent for the summer term when fewer stu-
dents attend school. The rules require not only
that a man must play as the guest of a girl but

Casual Essays_
By THE SUMMER OBSERVER.
COOKED BOOKS
The study hall on the first floor of the library
has changed books, changed librarians, and
changed students. A few still "cherchez la femme"
as they pass in the lobby. More of them sit, hold
a book, look at a syllabus, read, write, and sigh.
They are quite talkative, boldly daring the
"pinch-nez" marm across the table to glare at
them. She does not tumble to their trick. She is
concentrating on "Mind in the Making."
The frying heat can not touch some of these
cool minds. A wistful little woman reads tenderly,
"The Evolution of the Common School." Her com-
panion sadly lets her eyes rove over, "How to
Spend Your Leisure Time."
Neither one of them see a large pale man
who looks at them, not vacantly. He clears his
throat. He slaps his book down on the table
quite loudly. Nothing. Then, resigned, he opens
and looks at "The Relationship Between Play and
Intelligence."
At the desk the conversation is like the weather.
"What is this place?"
"The study hall on the lower floor?"
"Lower floor? Lower than what? I thought the
lower study hall was below this one, and what
is that one called?"
"The study hall in the basement."
"Well, where is the first floor study hall?"
"Here."
"Well, will you draw me a diagram? I'm so
accustomed to diagrams, that I - well, you see."
Out on the campus other cooked books were
making a great to do. A flock of charmer-salesmen
were cornering unsuspecting females. The large
beautiful things met their match in one saucy
younger miss. "Why, yes," she said as soon as she
saw the book. "Is there a recipe for jelly roll in
here?" The salesman was enchanted. He found
the recipe. And while she copied the treasure, he
stood by, reading to her, not exactly knowing why.
That done, she smiled and said, "Thank you,"
leaving a sad and embittered young man.
But the encounter of the one wearing a Delt
pin was sweeter. His smile was too much for
"her." She wilted. "The way to a man's heart," he
told her. The answer was in the book she held.
A limousine passed with a bride in full regalia.
She looked at her handsome Delt, and smoothing
her greying hair asked:
"And what, I wonder, is the way to a woman's
heart?"
"You'll find both answers in food, miss. Just
buy this book, and . .."
Screen Reflections
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good; one star just another picture;
no stars keep away from it.

Excursion No. 3: The Cranbrook
Schools: Leaving from in front of An-
gell Hall, Saturday. July 7, 8:00 a.m.
and returning at 3:00 p.m. Inspec-
tion of the five schools of the Cran-
brook Foundation, Bloomfield Hills,t
Christ Church, and the carillon.1
Round trip by special bus. Reserva-
tions in Summer Session Office, An-
gell Hall. Total expenses about $1.50.
Stalker Hall: Wednesday at 3:301
p.m. Outing, swim, and picnic supper.
In case of rain this program will not
be held. .
Summer School students desiring to,
join conducted groups to special ex-
hibits in Museum please register at
Summer Session office by Saturday,,
July 7.
Crystal Thompson, Curator
Department of Visual Education
Reading Requirements in German
for Ph.D. Candidates: Candidates in
all fields except those of the natural
sciences and mathematics must ob-
tain the official certification of an
adequate reading knowledge of Ger-
man by submitting to a written ex-
amination given by a Committee of
the Department of German.
For. the summer session this ex-
amination will be given on Wednes-
day, Aug. 8, at 2 p.m. in Room 203
U.H. Students who intend to take
the examination are requested to reg-
ister their names at least one week be-
fore the date of the examination at
the office of the German Department,
204 University Hall, where detailed
information with regard to examina-
tion requirements will be given.
University High School Demonstra-
tion Assembly: The first demonstr-
tion assembly of the University High
School will be given at 11 o'clock Fri-
day morning, July 6, in the high
school auditorium. The program will
consist of a playlet, written by the
pupils and teachers of the English
department, demonstrating the uses
of the library. One feature of the
program will be the introduction of
several of the characters from Book-

who are interested are welcome to at-
tend the assembly.
Registration for summer school stu-
dents is being held on Tuesday,
Thursday, and Friday of this week at
the Bureau, 201 Mason Hall - hours
10-12, and 2-4.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information: The
Bureau has received announcements
of the following Civil Service exam-
inations:
Junior Agricultural Statistician, 2,-
000 to $2,600.
Associate Veterinarian (Diseases
affecting Wild Animal Life) $3,200.
For further information, kindly call
at the Bureau, 201 Mason Hall.
Michigan Repertory Players: Open-
ing tonight at 8:30 in the Lydia Men-
delssohn theatre, the Players pvesent
the character-comedy, "Grumpy,"
with Francis Compton in the title
role. The play will be continued on
Thursday and Saturday nights. The
box-office will be open from 9:30 a.m.
to 8:30 p.m. The telephone number,
is 6300.
Michigan Repertory Players: A few
specially priced season tickets for the
remaining seven plays of the summer
season are available to those patrons
who neglected to purchase coupon
books during the first week of the
plays. Please call the Lydia Mendels-
sohn theatre box office, phone 6300,
for further information.
Intramural Sports Building will be
closed all day today.
Stalker Hall: Today at 3:30 p.m.
Outing, swim, and picnic supper.
Bring your swimming suits. Bring
car if you have one. Everyone in-
vited.

Michigan League Hostesses: The
following have been chosen to act as
hostesses, Friday evening, July 6, at
the Michigan League:
Jean Seeley
Maxine Maynard
Margaret Kimball
Jane Fletcher

Charlotte Whitman
Betty Aigler
Mary Morrison
Virginia Randolph
Marion Demaree
Alice Brigham ,
Phyllis Brumm
Kay Russell
Dot Moore
Frances Thornton
Margaret Sievers
Wilma Clisbe
Mary Ellen Hall
Barbara Nelson
Lois Inskip
Elva Pasco
Margaret Burke
Sue Calcutt
Marie Heid
Margaret Robb
Charlotte Johnson
Lucille Benz
Report to the Undergraduate Of-
fices at 8:15 promptly.
Ethel McCormick
Micati:ranGraduate
Democratic Leader
DETROIT, July 3.- (P) - Walter
I. McKenzie, Detroit attorney, who
was elected at Mackinac Island to be
chairman of the State Democratic
committee, is a veteran of the World's
War and a candidate for United
States District Attorney here. He
was graduated at the University of
Michigan in 1915, and joined the
army two years later.
He, is now president of the Polar
Bears' Association of the war veter-
ans. He was one of the organizers of
the Service Men's Bureau and the first
commander of the Wayne County
Council of the Veterans of Foreign
Wars.
He served~a term as assistant U. S.
Attorney and was connected for a
time with the Internal Revenue Bur-
eau. He was an alternate to the
National Convention of the Demo-
crats in New York in 1924, and a dele-
gate to the Chicago Convention of
1932 which nominated Roosevelt.

land. All Summer Session students1

-

ATTEND MCIGNATTEND
COOL MATINEES. . . . MICHCIGAON . . . OL MATNE
ENDS TONIGHT
WILLIAM POWELL MYRNA LOY
in Dashiell Hammett's Delightfully Charming Mystery Play
"THE THIN MAN"
TOMORROW
WARNER BAXTER ROSEMARY AMES
"SUCH WOMEN ARE DANGEROUS "
............ M AJESTIC ........ ...
ENDS TONIGHT
RICHARD ARLEN SALLY EILERS
"SeMade Here"
TOMORROW
HELEN TWELVETREES
"ALL MEN ARE ENEMIES"
Matinees 15c . . . . . W UE RT H . . ....Nights 2
TODAY and TOMORROW - TWO EXCELLENT FEATURES

ES
.5c

BR IGHT
SPOT'
802 Packard Street
Open 11 A.M. til 11:30 P.M.
3 BEAUTIFUL DINING ROOMS
featuring
SODAS, SANDWICHES,
SALADS, COLD LUNCHES
and HOT MEALS
LUNCHEON
11:30 to 1:45 - 25c, 30c, 35c
DINNER
5:15 to 7:45 ,- 35c, 40c, 45c
"YOU'LL BE SURPRISED"
Things Are
Looking''up

AT THE MAJESTIC
"SHE MADE HER BED"

*

Just another blood-and-thunder melerdramer
with everything from "fireman, save my child"
tripe to the poor helpless heroine being caught in
the same room with a (vicious) tiger. How in heav-
en's name Richard Arlen and Sally Eilers got
roped into such a show is beyond comprehension.
We expect them to play "Uncle Tom's Cabin" any-
time now.
The fire scene follows on the tiger scene just
like that. The villain puts the tiger in the room
with Sally Eilers and her baby, not knowing that
they are there. Sally throws the baby in the ice-
box (of all things) and escapes. Fire breaks out
and the villain (her husband) is burned to a crisp.
The baby, safe in the icebox, is unharmed, and
Sally is left free to marry her REAL love, Richard
Arlen, of course.
Robert Armstrong in the role 'of the villainous
husband who falls in love with a circus hoyden
and is very unfaithful to his oh-so-faithful wife,
Sally, is a flop. Eilers and Arlen can't overcome the
handicap of the vehicle. The only light in the dark-
ness is the stuttering Rosco Ates, who stutters all
over the place and manages to be slightly amusing.
Stay away unless you go in for this sort of thing.
If you have nothing else to do today and want
to see a show, we'd recommend the Michigan. "The
Thin Man" is still playing. --P.J.E.
THE MICHIGAN THURSDAY
"SUCH WOMEN ARE DANGEROUS"
Warner Baxter, Rosemary Ames, and Rochelle
Hudson are featured in "Such Women Are Danger-,
ous," the story of the love -troubles of a popular
bachelor-novelist, which comes to the Michigan
Theatre tomorrow.
Baxter plays the role of the much-harrassed
author who has ta stave off women admirers with
a club. Three of them (count 'em) trouble him at
one time or another, but he does the usual thing
and marries his secretary.
Mona Barrie ,Herbert Mundin, Henrietta Cross-
man and Lily Stuart are in the supporting cast.
THE MAJESTIC THURSDAY
"ALL MEN ARE ENEMIES"
This film is based on the novel by Richard Al-
dington, which tells the story of two lovers who
met, parted and found each other again after a

Pa H Muni
"HI NELLIE"

and George Raft
"BOLERO

=-

i

MICHIGAN REPERTORY PLAYERS
Present

T
H
E
S
U
M
M
E
R
R
E
C
T
0
R
Y

G
0
E
S
0
N
S
A
L
E
T
0
M
0
R
R
0
W

with Francis Compton as "Grumpy"

"Grumpy" is a doting grandfather of eighty odd years, irascible
and tender by turns. As a young man he had been a rather famous
criminal lawyer, and when his favorite nephew, carrying an uncut
diamond valued at something over four hundred thousand dollars
from the diamond fields of Africa to London, stops at Grumpy's
house and is robbed of the stone, all of the old gentleman's thief-
catching instincts are revived. The result is a very entertaining
evening in the theatre.
THE CRITICS SAY:
"I had a splendid time myself at "Grumpy," and feel a good deal as I
should if I had been off to a frivolous dinner, with champagne, gay company,
and no thought, and found myself the next morning with no indigestion."
-Norman Hopgood in "Harpers."
Grumpy is at once a comforting and inspiring personality, wholesome,
genuine, persuasive, and lovable." -Lawrence Eyre in the N.Y. Times.

&I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan