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August 03, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1934-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FR
litler In Absolute Contol Of Reich In Role O Chancellor-Pr(

[DAY, AUGUST 3, 1934
sident

Paul von Hindenburg, Famed Iron Man' Of Germany

Kipke Predicts
Good Year For
Football Team
13 Letter Men Back Next
Fall; Coaches Look To
SophomoresFor Aid
(Continued from Page 1)
omores and four juniors on the first
string, Capt. Roy Oen, fighting mid-
get center, being the lone senior.
Pre-season prospects, says Bernie,
indicate "only a hair-breadth be-
tween the first and second division
conference teams.
Wolverines Tough - As Ever
"It is true that Michigan lost a
flock of first team players, but a nu-
cleus of fine men from the freshman
squad is back - and this in addition
to some very good men from the reg-
ular team. So don't count them out.
The Wolverines are going to be a real
factor, as ever.
"Ohio State will have another big,
powerful, and fast team. And even
though a coach always works with a
handicap his first year, any tejam that
licks Francis Schmidt's 1934 outfit
must have real class.
"Doc Spears at Wisconsin, is going
to have the kind of a team he likes -
big and tough - they'll be hard to
stop.
"Iowa is a team to watch out for.
Their improvement in 1933 over 1932
was exceptional and that same kind
of improvement promises to continue
in 1934.
"Exactly the same thing can be said
about Illinois.
Sees Scrambled Race
"Purdue lost many men, but in spite
of it they will still be the same strong
and fast Purdue team of the last few
seasons.
"Northwestern has added to her
offensive possibilities without losing
any of her stubborn defensive
strength.
"Chicago was on the upgrade last
year and is going tohcontinue. In-
diana, under Bo McMillan, will be
watched closely.
"Maybe the race will be all scram-
bled up before the season is over. I
am sure of only one thing today -
1934 is going to be one of the con-
ference's most interesting years in
football."
Ii-Aii

-Associated Press Photo
- -

burg was destined for a military career. Born October 2, 1847, into the
family of a Prussian army officer, he early became a "career" soldier.
Before it ended he was field marshal and supreme commander of the
German forces during the World War.
He took part in Prussia's war against Austria in 1866, and was
present in the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles in 1871 when Bismarck
proclaimed the German empire after the French defeat at Sedan
in the Franco-Prussian war.,
By 1911 he had reached the retirement age after a long and
useful career as a military officer occupied with training and instruc-
tion, but he came out of retirement at the outbreak of the World War to
make an enduring place for himself in Germany and world history
by smashing Russia's military power at Tannenberg.
In 1871 he saw the Teutonic monarchies joined in a united Ger-
many stretching on the North sea from the Netherlands to Memel,
with Alsace-Lorraine added to its western frontier. He saw that new
Germany waxing as it sought "a place in the sun." And in 1919 he saw,
again with Versailles the scene, his country shorn of its powers and
its borders compressed. He also saw the "Polish corridor" cut off East
Prussia from Germany.
He returned with his men from the war to a country in the
throes of revolution. His kaiser had fled; not he. He became known
by the endearing title of "Der Alte," the grand old man of Germany.
Through thick and thin he could be counted on to serve his land. The
death of zhe first president of the German republic precipitated a crisis.
To stave off chaos he consented to run for the office. He was elected.
On his eightieth birthday he was eulogized by the then Chancellor
Marx as "a shining example of unselfish devotion to the public weal."
He was eiected for a second term.
The depression aided the Nazi's cause .and they swept into power.
Hitler was appointed chancellor and the all-Nazi reichstag gave him
the power of dictator for four years.

Wo men's Golf
PlayContinues;
Favorites Win
Defending Champion Has
Par-Smashing Ro u n d ;
Meets Dr. Bell
Reigning favorites continued into
the semi-finals of the championship
flight of the women's city golf tour-
nament at Huron Hills as a result of
yesterday's second round matches.
The defending champion, Miss Jean
Kyer, will oppose Dr. Margaret
Bell, director of physical education
for women, in one bracket, and Mrs.
Forrest Stauffer, the medalist, is
scheduled to meet Miss Nadena
Schmidt in the other.
Recording a par-shattering 38 on
the lower nine in her match yester-
day, Miss Kyer won handily over Mrs.
Max Williams, 8 and 7, while Dorothy
Lyndon, '36, was eliminated from1
further play by Dr. Bell, 6 and 5.
In the lower half of the cham-
pionship bracket, Mrs. Stauffer had
little difficulty in disposing of Miss
Helen Alexander, 5 and 3. Miss
Schmidt was the only one of the four
survivors who had any difficulty in
winning her match. She was forced
to go to the 18th green to defeat Mrs.
A. E. R. Boak, one up.
The finals in the championship
flight will be played Sunday afternoon
at the Huron Hills layout.
A male horse has 40 teeth and the
mare only 36, as a rule.
POUN'TAIN PENS
Parker, Sheaf fer Watezi.,
Conklin, etc., $1.00 and up.
A large and choice assorznt
314 S. State St., Ann Arbor.

..l

(I
FOR--
" ANALL-DAY OUTING...
* AN AFTERNOON PICNIC...
" AN EVENING'S ENTER-
TAINMENT ... Try
CANOEING on the Huron.
Saunders'
Canoe Livery
Huron River at foot of Cedar St.
Phone 9313

III

1

A HEALTH TIP FOR
SUMMER LUNCHEONS
T ODAY at Luncheon or any other
time stop at our modern Soda
Fountain for a tasty sandwich, a deli-
cious salad, a cooling drink.
Fountain foods will pep you up and
prevent that dull, feeling that often
follows lunch.
in. t in f dn.. hn t nlfrnn a nn fl.

/1

ouna os s, w noiesome anu nour-
ishing, will tempt your appetite on

1rF3i

11

i

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