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July 17, 1935 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-07-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1

_ _ _

I

k.

A Washington
BYSTANDER

SCREEN

Classifed Directory

FOLLOWUP ON ACADEMY
Yesterday's Daily had a note on the
French Academy. Any student who
wishes to follow up will find on pages
122, 123 of the current tLarousse
Mensuel (No. 340, June, 1935) a list
of the deathless who have been elect-
ed to each of the forty chairs from
1634 to date. The list is part of a
commemorative article.

1' 11

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON - The current report of Her-
bert Hoover's intention to announce some-
time in late summer that he is not seeking the
Republican nomination next year is a surprise
to the initiated only in that the former president
has decided or been persuaded to make any an-
nouncement at all.
There has been quite definite, all but first hand,
information in Washington for months that he
was not a candidate and did not expect to be
drafted.
On the contrary, the essence of this private
information is that it pictures Mr. Hoover as sur-
veying the field of non-eastern Republican elig-
ibles with a view to throwing his, support to the
most promising man. His actual or tentative list
of eligibles is not discussed and presumably not
known, even among his most intimate friends in
Washington.
* * * *
VALUE OF DOUBT
THIS is a much more definite sub rosa outline
of Mr. Hoover's position than that attributed
to unnamed Republican senators said to have been
meditating the unusual step of asking the titular
party leader to declare himself. Implicit in any
such request necessarily would be the suggestion
that he declare himself out, not in. It would over-
look, also, the very important political fact that
the Hoover influence upon party action, either as
to platform or nominees next year, may be largely
dependent upon continuing doubt as to whether he
is in the race himself or not.
If Mr, Hoover does issue a formal statement
as to his 1936 hopes or plans months before even
the first primary skirmishes for advantage take
place, its form would be highly important. Mere-
ly to say that he ,is not seeking nomination would
be tantamount to the Coolidge 1927 enigma,
the famous "I-do-not-choose" Black Hills state-
ment. That did set Hoover free as a Coolidge
cabinet member to work for his own hand. It by
no means eliminated Mr. Coolidge as a possible
draftee. Such a party stalwart as former Sen-
ator Simeon Fess of Ohio kept right on talking,
"draft Coolidge," until the Hoover nomination was
all but an accomplished fact.
NOT A LIKELY COURSE
A HOOVER statement this year that he is not
seeking another nomination would mean not
very much unless it went far enough to say that
he would not accept the honor if offered. That
does not seem a likely course for him to take, even
if it is his decision, as long as he expects to have
a voice in Republican national convention doings.
It could, however, work out for the beneficiary
of Hoover 1936 favor as the Coolidge statement did
for Hoover himself in 1927.
The years have not cleared away the mystery
of that Coolidge "I-do-not-choose" statement.
Was it a complete renunciation of another term?
Who knows? It could be that it was issued in
furtherance of the Hoover campaign for the
nomination, in which case Mr. Hoover himself
might be the only person who could clear it all up
since Mr. Coolidge's death. Certainly in the
summer of 1927 Mr. Hoover's friends were stew-
ing about Coolidge intentions even more visibly
and audibly than any group of Republican leader-
ship or near leadership is today fretting over Mr.
Hoover's 1936 intentions.

AT THE MAJESTIC
Double Feature
"THE WINNING TICKET"

*

A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer picture with Leo Ca-
rill, Louise F'azenda, Ted Healey, and others.
Also a Hearst newsreel.
A vapid, vastly boring "comedy" about an Italo-
Irish family's frantic search for a lost sweep-
stakes ticket after it has won much money for
them.
. Leo Carillo shows a semi-promising flair for
something besides the Latin-American role, and
paunchy Ted Healey manufactures a few laughs.
The rest of the time is spent in meaningless gib-
berish.
For once Hearst's newsreel is the most enter-
taining thing on the program, and the only good
thing in it is a shoot of the Moody-Jacobs battle
at Wimbledon. -R.A.C.
(No Stars) "STRANGERS ALL"
An RKO-Radio picture with May Robson, Pres-
ton Foster and others.
"Strangers All" has the appeal of a sign in a
fish store saying "Slightly Spoiled Tripe - Cheap."
From the beginning of this nauseating story of
a hateful, quarreling, and selfish family presided
over by May Robson, one feels as happy as if he
were one of the miserable group. This story of
their tawdry existence, falsely conceived by Holly-
wood, could not possibly be entertaining.
May Robson plays the part of a doddering old
woman all too well. The others, with the excep-
tion of one unknown, are uniformly poor.
-R.AC.

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FOR SALE
FOR SALE: New ladies bicycle. 9
months old. Excellent condition.
Phone 2-3586. 34
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
LEARN
TO DANCE
Social Dancing 1taught
daily Terrace Garden
Dancing Studio. Wuerth
rheatre Bldg. Ph.9695
Ns
ENDS TONIGHT
"Living On Velvet"
-- --_- Plus --- _
"I AM A THIEF"
Friday - Saturday

SWIM PICNIC
NEWPORT
BATHING BEACH
PORTAGE LAKE
Constantly Changing Waliter

..
x _.

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MAJESTIC
MATINEES
25c BALC. EVENINGS
35c Main Floor, Evenings
- Now -- Two Features -
MAY ROBSON
in
"STRANGERS ALL"
and
Leo Carrillo
Louise Fazenda Ted Healy
in
"THE WINNING
'1"flfr uiEaIcIv

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I _ ,

STAG E

LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices.rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
4x
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Gold Theta Sigma Phi soror-
ity pin between Betsy Barbour and
Library. Please return to Betsy
Barbour office.

t

As Others See It

0

Huey In Light Opera
'T MAY BE HEALTHFUL, in the heated spell at
least, -to cease viewing the (thus far) one-sided
joust between Huey Long and democracy as a fit
subject for Greek tragedy, and to look at its pos-
sibilities as light opera. If any librettist is so in-
spired, however, he will find that much of his
work was done some years before the Kingfish was
born. William Gilbert furnished the words and
Arthur Sullivan the music for it when they wrote
"Iolanthe," in 1882. In no interview or speech,
for example, has a more telling self-portrait of the
Louisiana senator been given than in these words
of Private Willis:
Though never nurtured in the lap
Of luxury, yet, I admonish you,
I am an intellectual chap,
And think of things that would
astonish you.
Early in the opera, of course, there should be a
stage spectacle of the Kingfish entering the State-
house at Baton Rouge, surrounded by bodyguards,
militia, legislators, share-our-wealth organizers,
etc., while the chorus sings these prescient words:
Bow, ye lower, middle classes!
Bow, ye tradesmen! Bow, ye masses!
Blow the trumpets, bang the brasses!
Tantantara! zing! boom!
The Queen of the Fairies, in the original version,
was addressing the British Parliament, but she
could sing these words, unchanged, to the Pelican
State Legislature:
Every bill and every measure
That may gratify his pleasure,
Though your fury it arouses,j
Shall be passed by both your houses.
Enter the peers (legislators in the 1935 edition),
to render this appropriate lament:
... Running amuck of all abuses;
His unqualified assent
Carrying every bill he may wish;
THere's a prtykettle of fish!I

Those who think of John Drinkwater as a stodgy
old carry-over of the Victorian era will find them-
selves in a state of misconception when they wit-
ness "Bird in Hand," which opened last night at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theated. In fact, the only
stodgy old Victorian element of the play is one
of the characters Mr. Drinkwater has created.
"Bird In Hand" is a clever three-act comedy,
picturing the circumstances and predicaments
which attend the courtship of Joan Greenleaf
(Mary Pray) and Gerald Arnwood (Vaudie Van-
denberg). Chief of the predicaments comes in the
person of Thomas Greenleaf (David Morrison),
Joan's father, who is the aforementioned exemplar
of Victorianism. Mr. Greenleaf's principles are the
shibboleths of the century which preceded him;
his strongest objection to his daughter's marriage
is that young Arnwood is of the nobility while
his daughter is of the "common stock," the hos-
telry of which he is the proprietor, owns no tele-
phone because such, in his opinion, is but a super-
fluous indulgence.
The quintessence of the comic element of "Bird
in Hand" is to be found in the personalities of
three travellers who are lodged at the Greenleaf's
inn as well as in the situations which arise out of
Mr. Greenleaf's tantrums. Act II, set in the bed-
room of two of the guests, is indeed the core
of the dramatic action, for the opening act is but a
lagging introduction and the final act is a none too
subtle denouement, if it may be termed that at
all.
From the standpoint of performance, "Bird in
Hand" suffers estimably in comparison, with the
plays which have preceded it. Only three mem-
bers of the cast may be said to have discharged
their action with credit. Oswald Marshall, as
Blangael, one of the guests at the inn, is the ec-
centric gentleman that the part required. Mr.
Morrison has easily the most difficult role in the
piece and, although not particularly convincing,
he executed his numerous lines smoothly. Much
the same may be said for Miss Pray, although her
role is not an important one. -R.S.R.
Bi OOKS
By JOHN SELBY
"AN EASTERN ODYSSEY,"
By George le Fevre; (Little, Brown).
ECORDS of Asiatic exploration usually deal
S withlong animal trains which plod wearily
across great wastes. A motorized expedition is still
a novelty, and the one which left Beirut, Syria,
for Peiping in April, 1931, was unusual in another
way. Its motor cars were equipped with rear-
wheel mechanism running on a continuous track
like a caterpillar tractor.
The expedition was commanded by Georges-
Marie Haardt, an associate of Andre Citroen in two
previous and similar ventures: an expedition across
the Sahara, and another across Africa from Col-
cmb-Bechar to Antananarivo. The second of
these required eight months; the Asiatic trek a
year. Upon this one numerous scientific bodies,
including the National Geographic Society of
Washington, pronounced a blessing.
The story Georges le Fevre tells in "An Eastern
Odyssey" includes almost every exploratory thrill
excepting those for which a high sea is essential.
The party was fired on by Chinese bandits, one
of its cars was left hanging over a precipice when
what was considered a.mountain road fell away
from beneath it, another car fell through the ice
of a drainage ditch, and was yanked out finally,
coatedrwith ice but able to go on. The danger was
that the extreme cold would freeze the contraption
in a solid block of ice.
As a matter of fact, there were two expeditions,
one which set out from Beirut and one from Pei-
ping. This last was captured by bandits early

MICH IGAN
5MATINEES
25C Balcony Evenings
35c Main Floor Evenings
-- Today - Two features -
All-Mystery Program
WARNER OLAND
"CHARLIE CHAN
IN EGYPT"
and

I

JEAN MUIR JOHN BOLES
"ORCHIDS TO YOU"
Sun4Iay
MIRIAM HOPKINS
"BECKY SHARP"

I

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-
a-
P~r~
Ito,
.maw
--
T -

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BEN BERNIE - GEO. RAFT
'Stolen oHrmony"Saturday
- plus - GEORGE RAFT
,ACKIE COOGAN (his best performance)
"H omeOn the Range' "T1HE GKLASS KEY"
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Perfor ance Tonight
JOHN
DR I NKWATER'S
ENGLISH RURAL
COMEDY
JULY 18, 19,20 8:30 P.M.
Single Admissions: 75c, 5Oc, 35c Phone 6300

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