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July 04, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-07-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-Associated Press Photo.
Lois and Louise Coats, San Diego, Calif., twins, made good their
vow to marry none but twins when they became the brides of Ray and
Roy Sebring, twin marines, at San Diego. Ray and Lois are shown at
left and Roy and Louise at right.

Fish Aren't So Poor - -
They Get Greenhouses
COLUMBUS, July 3. - (P) - A fish
hardly would be expected to call a
greenhouse home - except in Ohio
where fish greenhouses are next in
line.
They're being planned by. T. H.
Langlois, director of fish propaga-
tion in the state, as a sort of new deal
in temperature ontrol for fish eggs.
Under Langloi plan 10 of the 21
feeding ponds at the Newton, O.,
hatcheries will be covered by glass,
giving them the appearance of green-
houses. In that way he says tem-
perature can be controlled and the
season started a month earlier than
usual.
Russo-Japanese
Tempers Near
Boiling Point
Latest Episode In Border
Dispute Finds Both Are
Unwilling To Give In
TOKIO, July 3. - (A) - Japanese
military ambitions to gain important
islands in the Amur river - and Rus-
sia's determination to frustrate them
- were given today in a Soviet ex-
planation of the reasons behind the
latest episode in the three-year Russo-
Japanese dispute over the Siberian
frontier.
The Japanese government con-
tinued to show an inclination to dis-
miss lightly a Soviet warning, pre-
sented in Aa protest to Tokio, that
grave consequences" are likely to en-
sue if Japanese troops and Manchou-
kuan gunboats persist in entering
what Moscow insists is Soviet terri-
troy.
Frontier a 'ot Spot'
The new presentation of the Soviet
viewpoint insisted that the frontier
situation, especially along the Amur
river, is so fraught with danger that
the Moscow government felt com-
pelled to warn Tokio of it in strong
terms before something more serious
resulted.
A Soviet official asserted that the
Amur river islands, which the Soviet
now holds by virtue of the Sino-Rus-
sian treaty, signed at Peiping in 1860,
are coveted by the Japanese for two
reasons:
1. Because of their strategic im-
portance."
2. Because many of the islands
are reported to be rich in alluvial
gold.
The dispute centered around the
large island in the delta at the con-
fluence of the Amur and Ussuri rivers.
Nippon'sTroops Too Close
Russia insisted that if the Japan-
ese-sponsored state of Manchoukuo
held 'this island, it would place Jap-
anese troops within a few miles of
Khabarovsk, capital of the Soviet's
Far-Eastern province.
The Soviet also contended that it
would place Japanese artillery within
range of the vital railway bridge over
the Amur, an irreplaceable link in,
the Soviet's main line of communica-
tions to Vladivostok.
Army members of the supreme war
council heard General Senjuro Hay-
ashi, war minister, report on his re-
cent investigation of the Manchou-
Siberian frontier situation.
It was indicated, however, that he
dealt with the relative strengths of
the Japanese army in Manchoukuo
and the Red army in Siberia, and
the prospects for establishment of a
frontier commission, rather than the
questions raised by the Soviet pro-
test.
The City of Nogales, Ariz., council
ruled it would accept bonds issued
by it for liquidation of paving assess-

ments.

Britain Thinks
Dejrdins As
Good As Ever
Ex-World Champion Diver
Is Applauded In London
For New Feats
LONDON, July 3 - (A) - Pete
Desjardins, the United States ex-
world's champion diver, has proved
to English critics that, instead of
slacking off when he gave up com-
petitive diving, he is steadily going
ahead.
Capt. G. la C. Baudains, secretary
of the Amateur Diving Association
coaching committee, said after Pete's
first exhibition here: "To my aston-
ishment Pete is even better this year
than he was last, and he is doing
harder tricks than anyone else can
perform, even the crack divers in the
United States."
Before a capacity crowd that
cheered wildly he performed nearly
every dive on the springboard tariff
with ease. Then came his new and
most difficult numbers, known to div-
ers as "spotter"dives. They com-
mence with a spring and reverse
somersault to land for another bounce
on the board, then two-and-a-half,
or triple front somersaults to enter
the water. A third new "spotter"
that delighted fans here was a reverse
somersault with one-and-a-half
front somersaults and a half twist.
The reverse followed by triple som-
ersaults has been successfully com-
pleted only by Desjardins. ie said:
"I am working up to get a reverse
with a three and a half and a neat
entry. I hope to achieve this here
before the end of the summer."
Another dive never before per-
formed in England was Pete's double
jack-knife from a 10-foot hpard (run-
ning spring, jack, open, jack, open,
entry).
Desjardins is touring the British
Isles and the Channel Islands and
will return to Florida in September.
I Whre 1TorGe
2:00 Majestic Theater, "Vagabond
Lady" with Robert Young and Evelyn
Venable, and "Mary Jane's Pa" with
Aline MacMahon and Guy Kibbee.
2:00 Michigan Theater, "No More
Ladies" with Joan Crawford and Rob-
ert Montgomery.
2:00 Wuerth Theater, "West Point
of the Air" with Wallace-Beery, and
"All the King's Horses" with Carl
Brisson.
7:00. Same features at the three
theaters.
8:30 Lydia Mendelssohn Theater,
"The Perfect Alibi" presented by the
Michigan Repertory Players.
Dancing at the Blue Lantern Ball-
room, Island Lake featuring Clare
Wilson, and his orchestra.
RUOFF, AUTHOR DIES
CONCORD, Mass, July 3 - (A') -
Henry Woldmar Ruoff, 69, editor and
author of reference works and bio-
graphical works, is dead.
Among his better known works were
the Century Book of Facts, the Stand-
ard Dictionary of Facts, the Volume
Library and the Circle of Knowledge.
Chief Petty Officer F. Hesp, heaviest
man in the British navy, has retired
from service. The regugtion ham-
mocks for British sailors were not
strong enough to hold him.
.. AT E T WL
JrR

WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIRING

........ . .

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Er1

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Summer Sale of Famous
Ellen Kaye Fashions

g45

$1245

ELLEN KAYE Cottons at $8.45 ... printed dimities and lawns,
and linen: ELLEN KAYE crepes, jacket styles, one- or two-piece
frocks, in pastel crepes ... . and cotton formals, at $12.45.
Every dress cleverly styled!
Sizes 11-13-15-174

I

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