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August 16, 1935 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-08-16

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TWO

THE WtcuitY A N 11 A rT.V

FRIDAY-A [ GUT

"11-I 1Ui'11 1%AN hI .l 1

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Official Publication of the Summer Session

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PU bil196d every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
oci dted ,PAteiat ' s
- 1934 0 eA t1935 ~
MANtSOE WISCONSIN
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
- Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third As'sistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$150. Duringnregular school year by carrier, $4.08; by mail,
4.50.
Oiees: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West -42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR................. JOHN C. HEALEY
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR ..ROBERT S. RUWITCH
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Thomas E. Groehn, Thomas H.
Kleene, William Reed, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
ASSISTANT EDITORS: Robert Cummins, Joseph Mattes,
Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Rueger.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER ................. RUSSELL READ
ASSISTANT BUS. MGR..........BERNARD ROSENTHAL
Circulation Manager ....................Clinton B. Conger
BUISINESS ASSISTANTS: Charles E. Brush, Frederick E.
Magel.'
Ave Atque
vale .. .
T IS OUR SINCERE HOPE that
this, the 42nd annual Summer
eesion of the University, has been both profitable
and enjoyable to you all. As your summer jour-
nalists, it has been our privilege to have what
amounted to a "bird's eye view" of all that was
going on during your eight weeks' stay here, and
it seemed to us that from all angles - education-
al, social, and the purely recreational - this has
been a Summer Session of Summer Sessions.
Even the headache group of young men and
women, who were forced to remain over to make
up marks that didn't come up to the administra-
tion's idea of all that is studious, probably had a
good time. If you didn't like dancing, there was
baseball; if you didn't like swimming, there wis
Niagara Falls (no pun intended, at all); if you
didn't like the trip to the Ford River Rouge Plant,
there was the Observatory and the moon; if you
didn't like studying, you have probably found out
already that that was just too bad!
Well, so long. We hope you are inured suf-
ficiently to Ann Arbor's drinking water and Ann
Arbor's weather so that we may meet you again.
More Science Is The
Buyer's Need....

reaus of Standards does not generally release its
information to the public on the ground that such
a proceedure might promote comemrcial injus-
tice.
A spirited demand by the taxpayers made in
the name cf intelligent consumption should prove
effective in influencing a government now too
solicitous about the welfare of industry at the
expense of public enlightenment.
Standardization is another aid to scientific buy-
ing. Its adoption in the intermediary industrial
processes, the industries producing luxury goods
are excepted, would mean the elimination of a
great deal of complexity, confusion, and waste.
Standards have been adopted successfully for
such products as milk, electric wiring, electric
light bulbs, airplane motors, and fire-fighting
apparatus.
It is evident that the national government, aside
from certain information issued by the Bureau
of Standards and the Department of Agriculture.
has not done much towards helping the consumer
to get his money's worth, thereby raising his
standards of living. Neither has state nor muni-
cipal legislation been particularly active in this
direction. The consumer, if he Wishes to increase
his effectiveness in the market, must take the
initiative, both individually and as a member of
a group.
As an individual, he should avail himself of
whatever material is now released to promote his
interests; he should also develop and practice as-
siduously a sales resistance that would eventually
discourage the flamboyant advertisers. More ef-
fective still will be his efforts exerted as a member
of a consumers' group.
AROUND
THE12TOWN..

I'
By RUSSELL F. ANDERSON
Russ Anderson's mind having given away .
under the strain of impending examinations .
term papers . . . and that first four weeks' work
in journalism .. . we're writing the column for him
tonight in a sort of guest artist capacity.
As such, it is only appropriate . . . that the first
story be on Anderson . . . and his rivalry with
"Portly Pat" Conger of the Free Press ... Conger,
it seems, habitually uses two sheets of paper in
the Western Union typewriters . . . and hits the
keys with a hefty punch which leaves a well cut
stencil on the second sheet . . . he had been in
the habit of returning the second sheet . . . to
the pile of press message forms ... where Anderson
could read it ... and glean his news for the day.
When Conger learned the source of the leak ...
he planned his revenge . . . left a well cut stencil
.. . telling of a prominent university official-.
who had suffered a paralytic stroke on the Uni-
versity golf course . . . was rushed to a hospital
... where he was given an even chance for recov-
ery . . . but said to be permanently disabled .-.
Anderson found the story . . . read it . . . the
c,-ubby Hearstling stooge's usually pink face as-
sumed a roseate crimson of excitement . . . he
was about to call the hospital . . . and his office
... when he spotted an even better story below it
William Randolph Hearst . . . was demanding
the resignation of President Ruthven . . . for his
harsh attitude toward student radicals . . . An-
derson caught on.
* * * *
While sitting on the steps of Haven Hall ....
between examinations ... we were amused by the
girl who kept taunting her boy-friend . . . Who
apparently was putting his tiny mustache on
display for the first time . . . she said . . . "You
look so silly runnig around in a mustache!" . .
and that led us to wondering . . . personally .. .
with all our clothing inhibitions . . . we'd also feel
silly running around... in just a mustache!
Remember our telling you about . .. the Inkster
colored girl . . . who was arrested last week for
shoplifting . . . by local officers . . . and how she
pleaded with the judge that she was only stealing
the clothes in order to go to the Louis-Levinsky
fight? .....well . .. we looked up her record ...
and don't think she was quite the fight fan she
professed to be . .. we're inclined to believe she
was a girl with a right story for every occasion
. . .a month later . .- . it would have been the
World Seris . . . her list of previous convictions
. . . look like the Summer Directory . . . but to
sum it all up . . she paid the court $122.15 ...
n cash ... and yet she was stealing a dress to go
to Chicago fight . . . but--
* * * *

A NEW YORKER
AT LARGE
By JAMES B. PRESTON
NEW YORK - After tugging at the ropes for
. five wretched years, Thomas Wolfe, the novel-
ist, has finally yanked his flag to the top of the
mast.
Now his latest book, Of Time And The River
is roaring tnrough one edition after another, and
it continues to do so for the next 20 years. I don't
know who can lose as a result; certainly not
Wolfe, nor Max Perkins - his publisher and best
friend -nor his readers.
But my desire to sell books for Thomas Wolfe
and make him rich is no greater than Wolfe's de-
sire to be rich and he has no desire for this.
He is satisfied with his huge bare, untidy book-
lined room. It is my desire, however, to say that
in the life of the professional interviewer there
are few Thomas Wolfes.
* * * *
HE IS A MAN of termendous physical and men-
tal vitality. Standing over 6 feet 4 inches and
weighing over 220 pounds, he "takes command of
you with a shout." Without this vitality, he
should never have been able to get through these
past five years alive. For he has outraged the
rules by which most humans live, working through
the long black hours of the night, drinking one
pot of coffee after another to keep his great frame
moving, and then dropping his head on the table
for an hour or so and starting in all over again.
He writes these books, he says, to get rid of
them, to get them out of his mind. He believes
this is true of most writers and points to the dif-
ference in this point of view and that of the read-
er, who obviously reads books to remember them.
And Thomas Wolfe does many things for cur-
ious reasons. For example, when he does go to bed,
often he canont sleep, so he dresses and starts
walking. He manages somehow to end up at the
waterfront, along which he may stroll for hours
until fatigue overcomes him and drives him back
to his room. Then he sometimes drifts out to Eb-
by the Rhode Island result can not be doubted. It
* * * *
USUALLY, however, the hours not used in writ-
ing are given to reading. He believes prose
writers should read poetry, so he spends hours
cn the poem sof John Donne, John Keats, Coler-
idge and Browning. His own favorite books are
Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy and The World
Almanac. The latter he reads by the hour, mem-
orizing the population of the cities of the world
and the batting averages of the Major Leaguers
in the last World Series. These cold facts work
against the imaginative world in which he spends
most of his time.
Now he is making his first tour of the west and
learning how to use the typewriter. Though he
has written approximately 2,000,000 words in the
last five years, and has planned a series of six
books which will include between 2,000 and 2,500
characters, he feels that he could do better were
he able to get his ideas on paper faster.
A Washington
BYSTANDE:R
By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON - There is one company of 'new
dealers' to which Rhode Island's indicated de-
fection is bound to bring immediate trouble. That
is the firm of Ickes, Hopkins, Walker et al., dis-
pensers of the $4,000,000,000 work relief fund.
With the Rhode Island lesson so sharply before
their eyes, it easily can be imagined how local
Democratic political captains will look longingly
at the work-relief money chest for a bit of party
campaign sustenance. That the work-relief ad-
ministration will hear urgent pleas from sitting
House and Senate Democrats rendered uneasy
by the Rhode Island result canont be doubted. It
was hearing plenty from state chairmen and the

like already. Off the record, much is to be heard
about that from the members of the firm men-
tioned.
* * * *
NATURALLY NON-POLITICAL
SECRETARY ICKES should be more or less used
to the mixture of politics and government
business. He has been mixing in the game of
politics a long time. The other two, however, are
naturally non-political. If either Harry Hopkins
or Frank Walker ever entertained personal po-
litical ambitions, nobody ever heard about it.
There have been times when onlookers thought
Ickes might be in process of grooming for high
honors in a liberal party, whatever its actual label,
to come out of the liberal-conservative realign-
ment toward which Roosevelt policy was supposed
to be working. Since the Roosevelt-Republican
cabineteer got into the public works business not
much has been heard of that idea. He has clashed
too frequently with political heads in various states
over public works policy to foster the Ickes-for-
president-in-1940 talk.
Walker once demonstrated his dislike for politi-
cal life by escaping the Roosevelt spell for a matter
of months. When the job of devising an organi-
zation to spend the $4,000,000,000 came along,
however, he was not proof against the persuasive
voice of the President and was, most unwillingly,
redrafted.
* * * *
WANTS PRIVATE CAREER
THEN THERE IS HOPKINS. Close contact with
political life in Washington clearly has not cul-
tivated in him a taste for it. He is committed now
to the program of getting 3,500,000 employables off
relief and cn to work pay-rolls by November. When
that is accomplished, without question he would

Starts Film Career

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close atfive
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
Rxtra charge.
Cash in advance 11c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two Insertions.
1crper reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
fcr one or two insertions,
14c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By contract, per line --2 lines daily, on;
month ... .......... ........8c
4 lines E.O.D.' 2 months.r.......:c
2 lines daily, college year ...... ,.7c
4 lines E.O.D., college year.......7c
100 lines used as desired.........9c
300 lines used as desired ....8c
1,000 lines used as desired.......7
2,000 lines used as desired.....6c
The above rates are per reaaing line.
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
6c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 73 zpoint
type.

-Assoclated Press Photo
Madelyn Batson (above), 17-
year-old' winner of the 1935 Ken-
tucky beautiy title, is in Hollywood
where she is starting on a screen
career.
Fight Anew Against
Raging Forest Fires
SPOKANE, Wash., Aug. 15. -(P) -
Fresh workers' were rushed against
the three major forest fires still rag-
ing today.
Fires in the Absaroka Range, at
Deer Lodge and on private lands of
the Big Belt Range -- all in Montana
- still defied the fighters who ap-
parently have whipped down the
flames of The Dalles, Ore., and in the
Idaho National Forest.
Sev/:al 'thousand workers remained
at the fire lines, which now have
swept almost 100,000 acres. There
were 1,800 workers on duty in the
Idaho National Forest alone.
Three hundred fresh CCC workers
were sentagainst the Absaroka fire
after it ran wild last night. Forest
officials said the fire was of incen-
diary origin.
CUMMINGS NAMES FIVE
WASHINGTON, Aug. 15. - (1P) -
Attorney General Cummings named
five men today as candidates for the
newly-created Federal judgeship in
eastern Michigan. They are A. J.
Murphy; Arthur Lederle, Detroit at-
torney; Patrick H. O'Brien, former
Michigan attorney geenral; Frank
Picard, former chairman of the Mich-
igan liquor control commission, and
W. J. McKenzie.
MAJESTIC
MATINEES 25c
Nights, Balcony 25c, M. Floor 35c

NOTICE
WANTED: for rest of summer, stu-
dent to earn room and breakfasts
for part time driving. Call Mrs.
Frank E. Jones, 721 Tappan. 6105.
FOR SALE
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
FORsSALE: Antique jewelry, brace-
lets, brooches, earrings, etc. Rea-
sonable. Phone 8050. 2020 Dev-
onshire Road. 5x
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. ix
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls"
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
4x
Pedometer tests showed it required
14.1 miles of walking to visit all of
the exhibits at the San Diego ex-
position.
Mrs. H. R, Latier of Mineral Wells,
Tex., swallowed arpin 66 years ago.
A doctor recently removed it from her
right side.

FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Modern 6-room hou
with sun porch and breakfast roo
at 1225 White St. Inquire at 104
Packard.
FOR RENT: Furnished apartmei
with private bath and shower. Al
large- double room with hot aI
cold running water. Garage. Phor
8544. 422 E. Washington.
FOR RENT: MODERN APT. WIT
LIVING-ROOM, BEDROOM, KII
CHENETTE AND BATH. WEI
FURNISHED, CON VENIENTL
LOCATED AT 1106 WILLARI
GROUND FLOOR. PRIVA'T
ENTRANCE. AVAILABLE AFTE
AUGUST 17 UNTILL SEPT. 24 C
FOR WEEKENDS B E T W E E
THOSE DATES. FOR INFORMi
TION CALL 6539.
TO RENT: Room with private bat
Also three room apartment, tw
beds. Frigidaire. Private bat
Phone 8261.
Recreational Plan
Includes Yaclitin
MADISON, Wis., Aug. 15.--(P)
comprehensive program for develo
ment of Madison's recreation f
cilities has been incorporated in
"five-year plan" prepared by a speci
committee of Mayor James R. La
Besides providing for a civic aud
torium and swimming pool, the pr
gram covers every phase of recre
tion from development of vacant 1
playgrounds to organization of
yacht club.
"The commitete wishes to er
phasize the universal increase
leisure hours which demand that v
supply our citizens with clean, healt:
ful activities for that added freedo
if we expect to help in reducii
crime," says the report in support
suggestions made.
Sam Crawford, famous slugger
Detroit Tiger teams of another pro
perous era, is now an umpire in t
Pacific Coast league.

Classified Irectory

Today - Saturday
JAMES DUNN
"GEO. WHITE'S SCANDALS"
PAUL LUKAS
"CASINO MURDER CASE"
Sun. - Mon. - Tues.
SHIRLEY TEMPLE
IOUR LITTLE GIRL"
plus - Winning Ticket"

We P-oay

N A DAY when nearly everything
has been reduced to a scientific
method, the process of consumption remains a
haphazard, hit-and-miss affair.
A prevailing notion is abroad that the female of
the species, once married and in charge of the
household spending money, becomes endowed with
omniscient wisdom, so far as buying to get her
money's worth in the market is concerned. If a
husband were aware that his wife's much-vaunted
astuteness in expending the family income is
guided by nothing more than a touching faith in
advertisements and a naive trust that high price
is commensurate with high quality, he might be
moved, as one who is earning the money where-
with to play this game of buyers' blind-man's
buff, to agitate for the innovation of more science
and less chance into the system of buying.
There was a time when masculine faith in
feminine buying sagacity was justified. In the
handicraft days, when most household necessi-
ties were produced at home, women were keen
judges of excellence. Even in the early stages of
the Industrial Revolution, when production was
moving gradually from the home to the factory,
output was still sufficiently small to enable women
to be discriminating buyers.
Nowadays, however, no matter how desirous
the housewife may be of expending her allowance
wisely, she is practically defenseless in the mar-
ket. Contemporary mass-production methods
have put before her such a number and variety of
articles that she has neither the time nor the
ability to exercise intelligent selection. She must
inevitably fall back on advertising claims or on
price for assurance of quality.
What crimes are committeed in the name of both
these standards is revealed by two pertinent facts:
modern technical complexity in production, which
lessens the consumer's chance of knowing the
technical facts underlying a product, at the same
time increases the ease with which its merits can
be described by the advertiser; also high price is
no assurance of value, since cheap mass produc-
tion methods encourage manufacturers to add
great margins to the original cost before the retail
price is reached, thus depriving the consumer of
the economies which he should rightfully enjoy..
Although the application of the scientific meth-
od to consumption is yet in its infancy, there is
a growing hope that the public, eventually ex-
hausted by the exorbitant claims of the advertis-

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For

in JACK LONDON'S

BOOK

Police are still trying to break the alibi of
Detective harry Smith . . . who explains three
rounds of perfect goose-eggs . . . in the monthly
pistol contest Monday . . . by claiming that the
boys slipped him blank cartridges . . . he even
showed us a gun loaded with real bullets ... and
a box of blanks . . .his best evidence . . . is the
squib we columned about him yesterday . . .
which he keeps posted . . . on the bulletin board
ac police headquarters.
As Others See It
We Are Being Calm
Quite naturally, it would happen in Hollywood.
We refer to the project of the daring young doc
who proposes to freeze alive a daring young volun-
teer in the supposed interests of science. The doc
has been doing this with monkeys and boasts a
batting average of .500. That is, one monkey is
suposed to have arisen triumphantly from the ice
but the other gave up and died. A writer in the
New York Times says that, if the first monkey did
survive, it "is the most miraculous case of resusci-

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