100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 15, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-08-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DATT.V

''TURSDAY. AUGUSTT 15. 192

- - .'.. .'.A UN. X1 .Li.1. LN.Y . (]

C11.71.1r U 1 A 3y leY.S.7;

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Huey P. Long Is Just The
Official Publication of the Summer Session Life Of Every 'Party' ...

.........._._.. .
t

Pub11shied every morning except Monday during the
University yearand Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference ditorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
MSiMBER
msciatet oltgiate $r¢s
-sI934 I0~ok~sll35 e-
DSmON WSCONSIN
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
'The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.%
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, '$1.00; by mail,
1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan, Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y.--400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, Ill,
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR......... JOHN C. HEALEY
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR ..ROBERT S. RUWITCH
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Thomas E. Groehn, Thomas H.
Kleene, William Reed, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
ASSISTANT EDITORS: Robert Cummins, Joseph Mattes,
Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Rueger.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESP MANAGER.................RUSSELL READ
ASSISTANT BUS. MGR. ........:.BERNARD ROSENTHAL
Circulation Manager...................Clinton B. Conger
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: Charles E. Brush, Frederick E.
Magel.

W E NOTE WITH GLEE that Dictator
Huey Long of Louisiana has tossed
his crown into the presidential ring for the next
ballyhoo season, and if past performances along
the latter line mean anything he should win in
a walk. It has often appeared that the best way
to win offices is to put on the best show, and there's
very little doubt in our minds but what Huey is
capable of that, if nothing else.
Only a few days ago we gazed upon his beaming
countenance in a newsreel, as he showed us how
the Long ancestors mixed a Ramos Fizz which, in-
cidentally, they also invented. Of course this was
later contradicted, but it was fun while it lasted.
Anyhow, by this time another newsreel had shown
us our Huey breaking a violin over the head of
an orchestra leader -also all in fun.
Maybe if Huey can make us laugh all the time
we'll get so dizzy that we'll vote for him, and if
he can keep us laughing that'll be more than any-
one else has been able to do for a long (no pun)
time.
However, if he should lose out by some strange
vagary of fate, we might be able to cook up a
job for him here, as persident of the student
council or publicity director of athletic teams.
Peace-Loving Ethiopians
Facing Failure . .
THE TRI-POWER African confer-
ence opens with the disheartening
expectation of complete failure facing Ethiopia
and all lovers of peace, but even more discourag-
ing is the fresh evidence that not one of these
powers cares for the true welfare of Ethiopia.
Britain and France may hope for amicable
settlement of the dispute - because war in Africa
is to their detriment, and not because it may bring
the Emperor and his people under the control of
Mussolinimand Fascist Italy. They will urge peace
because the post-war set-up, favorable to them,
may be disturbed by war -not because of respect
and solicitude for the years of freedom and the
fionorable history of Ethiopia.
Britain is ready to propose to the other powers
that the African kingdom be opened up to Fascist
exploitation. So is France. Both insult Haile
Selassie by presuming that their offers of "nom-
inal" independence would be acceptable.
There is Japan, too, so anxious to protect the
integrity of Ethiopia - but probably only so long
as there are no African "bandits."
Emperor Haile Selassie is earning the respect
of people if not governments in his proud and
courageous refusal to agree that might makes
right.

AROUND
THETON.
By C. BARTON KANE
Yesterday . . . we had a rollicking good time ...
;itting in tne court-room watching the divorce
cases run thi ough the mill . . . we couldn't help
but smile at the small . . . pathetic looking little
gent . . . who was attempting to get a divorce
from his rvther comely, yet wild-looking wife.
as part of the testimony . .. he stated . .. "that
since our marriage I know she has been kissed by
at least two parties" . . . we looked at her--
and concluded . . . that it must be the Democratic
and Republican.
* * * *
We're rather elated today . . . we got five dollars'
for our last story ... from the post-office, . ,. they
lost it!
Last night . . . we were talking with one of
the professors of the psychology department .
who wandered in . . . just as we were beginning to
work . . . he told us this . . . about the last ex-
cursion that the department took . . . to the in-
sane asylum . .. near Ypsilanti .. . it seemed that
one of the inmates was apparently fishing over
a flower-bed ... when one of the student members
of the party . . . wishing to be affable . . . ap-
proached and remarked . . . "How many have you
caught? . .. "You're the ninth" was the reply.

State Plans To
Electrify Many
Rural Sections
Plblic Trust Commission
Surveys Michigan For'
Aid Of Utilities

Classiuied Directory

Fn -Uh r

lone 6 Arw

V 'U £JK KENUII~AN.
R T M rn 6FORS ALE
RENT: Modern 6-room house ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-

* * *

LANSING, Aug. 14.- () - Imme-
diate construction of 2,000 to 3,000
miles of extensions to rural electric
lines is the goal today of the state's
rural electrification committee.
Emerson R. Boyles, a member of
the state public trust commission
which met here yesterday, said com-
mittee members, made up of repre-
sentatives of farm organizations, util-
ity interests, and the commission, will
,onduct a state-wide survey of rural
electrical needs. Plans call for com-
pletion of the survey in 20 days.
The survey will determine the thin-
ly populated areas of the state into
which utilities may extend their
power lines at a profit. Boyles esti-
mates power companies can build
extensions wherever they can find five
steady subscribers to each mile. He
declares funds will be sought from
the rural electrification administra-
tion at Washington to further the
program.
H.. L. Gallagher, assistant profes-
sor of agricultural engineering at
Michigan State college, utility com-
pany officials, and representatives of
the state grange and the state farm
bureau will attempt to measure the
demand for extension of rural lines.
Boyles said the committee will co-
ordinate the efforts of the various
groups to arrive at a uniform fi-
nancing plan for extensions.
M. L. Cook, national administrator
of rural electrification projects, will
be consulted by Boyles, who declares
Michigan should be the first state
to submit a rural electrification pro-
gram for Federal financing. The
utilities commission, Boyles said, will
act as an arbitrator in cases where
companies ask exorbitant rates for
service extensions.
Humane Group
Talks Of Island
'Hack Horses'

with sun porch and breakfast room
at 1225 White St. Inquire at 1000
Packard.
FOR RENT: MODERN APT. WITH
LIVING-ROOM, BEDROOM, KIT-
CHENETTE AND BATH. WELL
FURNISHED, CONVENIENTLY
LOCATED AT 1106 WILLARD.
GROUND F L O OR. PRIVATE
ENTRANCE. AVAILABLE AFTER
AUGUST 17 UNTILL SEPT. 24 OR
FOR WEEKENDS B E T W E E N
THOSE DATES. FOR INFORMA-
TION CALL 6539.

TO RENT: Room with private
Also three room apartment,
beds. Frigidaire. Private
Phone 8261.

bath.
twin
bath.

NOTICE
WANTED: for rest of summer, stu-
dent to earn room and breakfasts
for part time driving. Call Mrs.
Frank E. Jones, 721 Tappan. -6105.

.I

Sag Of Cotton And Rise Of Silk
May Aid Japanese-U.S. Relations

NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
FOR SALE: Antique jewelry, brace-
lets, brooches, earrings, etc., Rea-
sonable. Phone 8050. 2020 Dev-
onshire Road. 5
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. 1x
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. PrIces rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
. 4x

*

A Word Picture
Of Michigan . . .
T HE MICHIGAN DAILY herewith
presents to you, whom we hope
to welcome on Tuesday, Sept. 24 as incoming stu-
dents. a composite and somewhat detailed picture
of life in Ann Arbor at the University of Mich-
igan.
Naturally we editors of The Daily, most of
whom have been here for four years, consider this
University just about "tops." Naturally, too, we
think Ann Arbor's a pretty fine city. We have
found our instructors and our fellow students
to be the best any one could ask, and, all in all,
our years here have been a wonderful experi-
ence.
It is our earnest hope that this special issue
of The Summer Michigan Daily may bring these
things to you a little more clearly, and perhaps
may make a Michigan man of you too.
See you in September!
'Shedding Chastity;'
Detective Story Style ...

Speaking of excursions ... we were on a geology
field trip . . . not so very long ago . . . and while
we were all standing around a farm-house await-
ing the arrival of our bus . .. one of the students
. . . inquired of the farmer . . . "Do insects ever
get into your corn out here?" . . . we chuckled
.. when the old master of the soil responded ...
"Yeh, but we fish 'em out and drink it anyway."
We like to know intimate details about great
men . . . but when our own library announces that
they now have a book on their shelves . . . en-
titled . .. "Tolstoy as His Wife Saw Him ... we're
inclined to think that is going just . .. just a little
too far.
A NEW YORK ER
AT LARGE
By JAMES B. PRESTON

T ODAY IN THE MAILS we receive(
a blurb from a lurid crime magazine
The "release" was to inform us tlat in the curren
issue of the publication there is an article entitle(
"fighting the Red Terror in our Schools," which
among other nice things, would divulge that:
"Girls in American high schools and college:
are being taught to shed chastity as easily a:
they kick off slippers. Boys are instructed tc
sneer at the American government and. not tc
fight for it under any consideration. Student;
listen in to classroom lectures that marriage is
outmoded, that religion is a capitalistic myth;
and that Lenin should be substituted for God."
Then, sententiously proceeds the publicity item
"according to a nationwide research undertaker
in the last few months, "Red" instructors in the
pay of Moscow and 'pink' publicity-seeking pro-
fessors are polluting schoolrooms in even our
leading universities with the teaching of Com-
munism, Atheism, and Free-Love."
Such a trashy, falsely American, and utterly
untrue statement should not go unanswered.
Students in college classrooms today are NO'I
being taught these things. One has only to GO
to college to learn that these things are untrue.
It is not the professors who are "publicity-seek-
ing." Rather it is magazines which as this and
newspapers which play upon the fears of the
public concerning "scares" to swell their circula-
tions.
"Shedding chastity" indeed! Such bunk!
justice That Becomes
A Tradition ...
MICHIGAN'S famous justice that is
fast becoming a tradition is again
shown to the people of the nation in the verdict
that a Detroit jury rendered yesterday in the case
of the murder of Howard Carter Dickinson.
For some time there has been a growing feeling
throughout the United States that, even though
Michigan does not have the extreme penalty for
murdler cases, it is nevertheless a state in which
justice is swift and sure; a state which the crim-
inal might do well to cross off his list of future
location. The repeated example is surely a vital
factor in the decrease of crime in the state.
When efficient police forces, such as our state
and metropolitan groups, are ready to bring crim-
inals to justice; when honest and competent judges
preside in the courts; and when it is possible
to get a jury that is able to face the facts, residents

The SOAP BOX
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of conimunic~nts will, however,: be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors ar4 asked
to be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words and to accept or reject
letters upon the criteria of general editorial importance
and interest to the campus.
Bring Back The Bonnet For Me
My Dear Mr. Editor:.
Kindly allow an old, old alumnus whose college
I days are long past reminisce for just a moment.
While going through some old things I had packed
away in the attic I came across a small grey cap
with a blue button on top.
My pot. What memories it brought back. To
me and to every other Michigan man a pot is not
a head covering. Rather it is a symbol of the
best in college life. A symbol of loyalty, brother-
hood, unity and class spirit.
Class spirit is no idle word we read in books
about college. It is a real tangible thing inval-
uable to every Michigan man. The memory of a
true class devotion, the fierce rivalry, and the close
union resulting thereof is something that never
leaves us.
I am not much for writing as you see so it is
difficult for me to express my feeling I had when
I discovered my pot, the symbol of my freshman
year. I relived that year when a small sturdy
group of freshmen outnumbered by 250 sopho-
mores bravely battled through them to climb their
sacred pole and bring down their much coveted
flag and march triumphantly home by torchlight.
The members of the class of '39 can make their
first year as joyous and as glorious as was mine.
I am coming back this Fall to see the boys wear
their pots and to see them bring down the sopho-
more flag.
-Class of '39.
BOOKS

NEW YORK -Glances At The Nameless:
An aged man standing on a stepladder at
41st and Fifth Avenue, preaching communism,
which could not possibly come during his lifetime.
Still he spoke eagerly, relating eloquently the sad
story of his life to a great crowd which circled
around him and blocked the Fifth Avenue pave-
ment.
* * * *
Driven by the heat into the open, the town's
stragglers lying in the filthy niches between the
buildings or on the grass of the parkway in the
center of Park Avenue. Dust whirling house-high
through the streets, covering them; and occasion-
ally the profane sound of a policeman's whistle
cutting through the night and rousing them from
their poor corners.
* * * *
A POLICEMAN, stationed at an uptown Man-
hattan corner, sitting in the partol car waiting
for orders from headquarters and reading a "true
story" magazine.
* * * *
In a decorative fountain in Washington Square
in the shadow of the great arch "to commemorate
the 100th anniversary of the inauguration of
George Washington," scores of squealing young-
sters in bathing suits begging passerby: "Toss a
penny in the water, mister?"
Two veteran character actors standing in the
lobby of the famous Lambs Club on 44th street.
1st: Have you got a job in the summer theaters?
2nd: Yes.
1st: D'you get paid?
2nd: No. but the script calls for dinner to be
served in the last act, so I don't mind so much.
* * * *
AND THIS reminds me that the actors have
found a new way to make money during this
time of the year when Broadway is just another
street in town. They are working for manufactur-
ing concerns and sales organizations, making com-
mercial movies.
The industries, it seems, have found many uses
for the movies in the last few years and need ac-
tors to play the parts. Most of these movies are
made in the summer when the light is better and
this coincides with the actor's plans, which are
notoriously slim at this time of the year. Now,
however, some of them make more money out of
the commercials than they make on the stage and
not a few of them have made their way into the
movies through these skits.
The players have adopted numerous ways of
getting past the months of inactivity in the theat-
er. Some have clubbed together and rented a cab-
in somewhere along the Sound; many have van-
ished west to their old homes and will reappear
around the first of September, and not a few
have taken to the department stores, where they
work behind the counters until autumn.

Problem Of Allowing Cars
To Enter Mackinac Is
Taken Up By Society
MACKINAC ISLAND, Aug. 14. -
P) - The hack horses of Mackinac
Island, recently the subject of an in-
vestigation by Gov. Frank D. Fitz-
gerald to determine whether they
should be augmented by automobiles,
received the attention of the Mich-
igan Humane society at the opening
session of its annual meeting here to-
day.
The society, with its twelve affiliat-
ed organizations, chose Mackinac
Island for its meeting place this year
so that it might study the condition
of the hack horses in one of the few
places in the United States where the
automobile has not penetrated.
Besides a review of proposed and
existing legislation for the protection
and humane treatment of all animal
pets and beasts of burden the society
also planned a campaign to set up af-
filiated groups in every Michigan
county.
Mrs. Charles M. Kindel, of Grand
Rapids, president of the society, asked
that those interested in organizing
local or county humane societies get
in touch with her for further details.
The society last year was active in
securing Federal funds for feeding
livestock in drought areas.
The affiliated societies which sent
representatives to the twoday annual
meeting at the Grand Hotel included
Lenawee County Humane Society,
the Ann Arbor Humane Society, the
Berrien County Society for Preven-
tion of Cruelty to Animals, the De-
troit Humane Society, the Genesee
County Humane Society, the Kent
County Humane Society, the Jack-
son County Humane Association, the
Humane Society of Kalamazoo Coun-
ty, the Mackinac Island Humane So-
ciety,the Muskegon Society for Pre-
vention of Cruelty to Animals, the
Oakland County Animal Welfare So-
ciety, and the Saginaw County Hu-
mane Society.
50 YEARS SERVICE
Rev. W. M. Coile founded the Win-
terville, Ga., Baptist church 50 years
ago, and has been its only pastor.
'mi

WASHINGTON, Aug. 14.- Current
price trends of cotton and silk may
help to maintain amiable trade re-
lations between the United States
and Japan.
With cotton sagging and silk ris-
ing from abnormally low levels, trade
experts anticipate a reduction in Ja-
pan's top-heavy excess of imports
from the United States. Last year
it amounted to $91,000,000.
In the outcry last spring over im-
ports of- Japanese textiles, Japan's
spokesmen pointed out that the trade
scales were heavily weighted in favor
of the United States. Japan, they
pointed out, would have to balance
the scales in order to maintain its
volume of purchases in this country,
either by obtaining better prices or
expanding the volume of its sales.
The problem was left to a cabinet
committee to solve after its inquiry
into the textile situation. A report
is expected soon.
Some close followers of the textile
investigation say the shift in price
trends holding out promise of a better
balance in trade payments between
the two nations, should simplify the
task of finding a formula acceptable
to both.
May Restrict Sales
There have been rumors in textile
quarters that Japan may undertake
voluntarily to limit its cloth ship-
ments to the United States to allay
agitation for drastic restrictions on
imports of Japanese goods. No con-
firmation has been obtainable.
At any rate, recent trade figures
disclose a substantial reduction in
Japan's import excess this year. Ex-
ports to Japan in the first six months
underwent little change compared
with last year, totaling about $92,-
000,000 against about $90,000,000 in
the first six months of 1934. But
American imports expanded in value
to approximately $70,000,000 from
nearly $60,000,000 in the first half of
last year.
Silk contributed to the import gain,
both in value and quantity. The
current advance in the market for
that fiber is expected to accelerate
the trend, unless Japan offsets it
with larger purchases in the United
States.
Trade between Japan and the Unit-
ed States is unique in that two basic
dominate it in a two-way exchange.
To a large extent, it is cotton for
silk.
Silk in the first six months of this
year accounted for nearly $40,000,000
of the $70,000,000 credited to Japan
on sales in this country.
Following the severe decline in Eu-
ropean takings of cotton last sea-
son and the expansion in textile man-
ufacturing in the Far East, Japan
became the largest market for the
American staple,
Cotton was the biggest factor in
making Japan the third largest ex-
port market in our foreign trade, sum-
- E

passed only by the United Kingdom
and Canada.
The heavy Japanese purchases of
cotton the last few seasons' together
with the rise in price, helped to turn
what formerly was an export excess
into a deficit in Japan's trade with
the United States.
Silk, without the benefit of AAA
loans and depressed by an over-
hanging surplus and competition of
rayon, failed to share in the early
recovery of domestic price levels to
the extent other fibers did. Lately,
a moderate expansion in consump-
tion and reduction in supply have
influenced an upturn.
The value of exports to China in
June made a sharp contract with fig-
ures for the comparable 1934 month,
before silver began to climb rapidly
as the United States entered the
worldmarket to buy the metal for its
monetary reserves.
June exports to China, according
to Department of Commerce figures,
totaled only $2,295,121 against $9,-
582,950 in June, 1934. For the first
six months exports declined to $22,-
668,355 from $37,945,682 in the com-
parable period last year. At the ame
time imports from China jumped to
$30,340,682 from $24,727,747.
Critics of the administration's sil-
ver policy pointed to the drop as a
vindication of their argument higher
silver prices would depress American
sales in the Orient, rather than help
them, as some silverites forecast.
Trade experts, however, explained
the decline in American exports to
China consisted largely of raw ma-
terials, mainly cotton, grains, tobac-
co and lumber. Similar contraction
in exports of raw materials has been
recorded in trade with countries un-
affected directly by the rise in silver
they noted.
Moreover, they said, China. was
expanding its output of tobacco. More
than $800,000 of the June drop in
exports was accounted for by leaf
tobacco.
Nevertheless, it was conceded the
decline in such exports as cotton and
lumber probably could be attributed
in part to the rise in silver and the
deflationary effect it exerted upon,
Chinese textile and building activ-
ities.
I -

SWIM

PICNIC

NEWPORT
BATHING BEACH
PORTAGE LAKE
Constantly Chagn ae

By JOHN SELBY
"A Daughter of the Medici," by Donn Byrne;
(Appleton-Century).
SEVEN YEARS after Donn Byrne's death, his
short stories still are being collected. The lat-
est volume is "A Daughter of the Medici," and
just why the book should be given the title of one
of the least worthy stories it contains is a question.
For "A Daughter of the Medici" is the story of
an Italian grand dame who (for no very plausible
reason) married a bounder who left her and her
money in Italy, came to New York to make his
fortune, married a cheap and wholly appropriate
girl without the formality of divorce, and finally
was hoist by his own petard. Mr. Byrne was better
closer home.
Better, for example, in the grand story of old

MICHIGAN
Nights, Balc. 25c,
Matinees 25c T onigh
Main Floor 35c
BIG
AMAT EUR
SHOW
On Stage at 9 p.m.
Cash Prizes
SCREEN
FRED MacMURRAY
in the Paramount
Thrill Hit
" MEN
WIT HOUT'

Terrace Garden
Dancing Studio
Instructions i n' a 11l
forms .Classical,nsocial,
dancing. Ph. 9695.
Wuerth Theatre Bldg.
-AJ ESTC
MATINEES 25c
Nights, Balcony 25c, M. Floor 35c
CLARK
in JACK LONDON'S
CALL.'
ConstntlyChaningraie
tkmL

THESIS TYPING
Prompt Service Guaranteed
RIDERSr
302 South State Street

I

I

to entertain his excellency and his lady. Patricl
found out, took from its cabinet the old but well
oiled weapcn which had accounted for one lord
lieutenant -- and fell to his death down the stair.

4

"..: i

U"

IU

1.11 1 N - - -r.'* v-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan