100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 14, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-08-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 1935

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Official Publication of the Summer Session
AROUND.

+.f+ ~. . ~ ~i a " i i i i f i '

:t

T-

i -

Was He The Hero?

I

STAGE

assifiedDirectory

1

0

By RUSSELL F. ANDERSON
Yesterday . . . we drove about three miles south
on State street . .. to the Ann Arbor Airport ...
to take a look at the monoplane . . . in which
Laura May Brunton crashed Monday night .
the wings were in a tree about one hundred yards
back . .. and the motor, twisted and turned .. .
was resting in about the center of the fuselage ...
with the force of the impact the motor came back
pinning the 22-year old aviatrix . . . which all
leads us to believe that perhaps final exams are
not so bad after all.
* *
Oh! - Oh! - we see according to our own press
bulletins that the FERA is arranging so thousands
of literary jobs will be available to unemployed
authors ... we only regret that they do not employ
AAA tactics . . . and then have the real solution
to the problem . . . let the government pay, the
- riters for restricting their crops . . . or might
we even sugest plowing them under.
Yesterday's papers inform us that the University
of Michigan will lend complete support to the es-
tablishment of children's probation camps in
Michigan ... we are also happy to add ... that
Sistie and Buzzie Dali .. are standing solidly be-
hind the idea.
Detective Harry Smith of the local police de-
partment . . . is still blushing . . . yesterday he
went out on the pistol-range with the squad .. .
to get in several rounds of practice . . . in all his
years of police work Smith has regarded himself
as a pretty good shot ... and rightfully so ... yet
when he stepped up to the firing line and emp-
tied his magazine . . . the scorer gently informed
him that he hadnt' even hit the large sheet of
paper on which the target was mounted ... and
it was only 25 yards away . . . he felt bad about
that . .. until he discovered that some wag had
loaded his gun with blanks.
We were wondering if any of the readers ---
have noticed the way a certain squirrel . . . has
been turning somersaults ... and doing a fandance
in the center of the campus .. if so . . kindly get in
touch with our office immediately . . . as we are
desirous . . . of passing the information . . . on
to one . . . a member of the faculty . . . who in-
sists that it is going on ... but can't get any body
to believe imn... for the sake of a man's sleep
will somebody PLEASE respond.

A Washington
BYSTANDER

' PERSONS who are well acquainted with
psychopathic wards and their inmates G. Mar-
tines Sierra's "Kingdom of God" is little more than
a two-hour clinical analysis of the various factors
vhich go toward making sane people psychoneuro-
tics or neurasthenics; but to those who have man-
aged to keep away from these asylums "Kingdom
Of God" becomes an intensely dramatic sketch
covering most of the sordidness, niggardliness,
and ignobility that life hold.
It is this production which the Repertory Play-
ers have chosen to close their series of summer
plays at the Lydie Mendelssohn Theater. Be-
cause of tne University examinations only two
performances are being given.
This excursion into the vagaries of baseness is
conducted by Sister Gracia, a nun (technically she
is annually at liberty to renounce her vos) in the
Spanish order of St. Vincent. de Paul. Cleverly
Playwright Sierra has covered almost the com-
plete life span of this sister. She is introduced at
the age of 19 when she appears in an asylum for
poor old men; in the second act Sister Gracia
is 29 and at a home for wayward women; finally
we see her, aged 70, as superior of an orphange.
Sister Gracia is portrayed ever so ably by
Sarah Pierce. It is no overstatement of fact to
say here that Miss Pierce is the most capable
actress of the entire Repertory troupe for she
proved it conclusively in her role last evening. Her
ability to adapt her character to the changing.
mental outlook of Sister Gracia is easily the high
point of the cast's efforts. In Act I Gracia is an
idealistic, almost angelic, benefactress; at 29 she
begins to evidence the effect of the baseness which
surrounds her; in the final scene she appears as
a quibbling disciplinarian. In all these varying
conditions, Miss Pierce demonstrates an outstand-
ing feeling for the role.
To many "Kingdom of God" will not represent a
successful evening's entertainment. It is true that
it suffers unmistakably from weak acting on the
part of the supporting cast; in but a few scant
instances are there acceptable characterizations
instead of a conscious feeling of overacting. But,
withal, this play is a fully capable effort through
the work of Miss Pierce alone.
-R..S.R.
As Others See It
Legalizing The Law
Censure of the Bruno Richard Hauptmann case
by the American Bar Association at Los Angeles
recently, which called it a public show and an
affair that cheapens life itself, adds another chap-
ter to the history of the legal profession which in
some phases has long needed a spring cleaning.
The fact that a man was on trial for his life
mattered little to the sensation seekers who flashed
themselves before the public eye at any cost., And
the fact that this is occurring in many like cases
is as apparent to the general public as to those
familiar with the technicalities of the law.
It would seem then that the resolution of the
association to ask the cooperation of the press,
the radio, and the legal profession to eliminate a
continued undervaluing of life will be favorably
met. Every one concerned must surely wish no
repetition of such incidents as occurred in the
Hauptmann trial.
A ways and mean committee has been formed
to bring about a better understanding between
the news services, the radio systems and the law-
yers, so that it would be of little profit in the fu-
ture for publicity seekers to become the dominant
characters or even principals in future trials. The
best plan in the mind of the association, is the
exclusion of exploiters from the courtroom itself.
Only the presence of those necessary to the pro-
cedure of the case and the barring of all others
would be the best kind of soap for the cleaning.
-The Columbia Missourian.
BO0OKS

By JOHN SELBY
"Racing the Seas," by Ahto Walter and Tom
Olsen; (Farrar & Rinehart).
AHTO WALTER began life in Estonia July 15,
1912. His father was a seaman of the old
school, and his mother was the right sort for such
a family. Young Ahto began life in a controversy
- the village priest refused to baptize the Walter
boys in the church, because their names were
chosen from the ancient and pagan lore of the
land. Ahto is Finland's god of the seas.
Ahto's father bought (at first) two sailing boats
for his boys. Then he bought two more, and the
lot was put through a course of seamanship that
must have been almost perfect. Ahto never has
stopped sailing small boats, and probably never
will. As a tiny boy he wduld sometimes capsize
his boat rather than lose a race to his brothers.
He does not capsize boats now, but he does win,
races.
When he is not racing, he sails back and forth
:cross the Atlantic just for fun. He picks up a
living with articles for yachting magazines and
such work, but after reading "Racing the Seas,"
which he has written with Tom Olsen, his com-
panion on his recent voyage from Bathurst in
Africa to New York, one gathers that he would
cheerfully starve if that were necessary to keep
afloat.
The book is one of the most delightful sea yarns
in years. Chiefly its laconic charm comes from
understatement. There are enough excitements

FOR SALE
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
FOR SALE: Antique jewelry, brace-
lets, brooches, earrings, etc. Rea-
sonable. Phone 8050. 2020 Dev-
onshire Road. 5x
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. lx
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls-
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
4x

f

-Associated Press Photo.
World War veterans of Connecti-
cut say honors which have gone to
Alvin C. York of Pall Mall, Tenn.,
for capturing a German machine
gun battilion in France rightfully
belong to Bernard J. Early (above)
and have asked that a Congress-
ional medal be awarded him.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is con-
structive notie to al mecmbers of
the University. Copy received at the
office of the Summer Session, Room,
1213 A.H. until 3:30; 11:30 Saturday.
VOL. XVI. No. 45
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 1935
Examination for University Credit:
All students who desire credit for
work done in the Summer Session
will be required to take examinations
at the. close of the Session. The
examination schedule for schools and
colleges on the eight-week basis is as
follows:

TO RENT: Room with private
Also three room apartment,
beds. Frigidaire. Private
'Phone 8261.

bath.
twin
bath,

the building is completely closed while
extensive repairs are in progress.
Graduate Reading Rooms, and Study
Halls both within and outside of the
main building will be closed until
the opening of the fall semester. All
departmental and collegiate libraries,
with the exception of the Transporta-
tion Library, are also closed during
this interval.
Wm. W. Bishop, Librarian.
Exhibition of water color sketches
and mural decorations, Architecture:
Building: Beginning Thursday morn-
ing there will be on exhibition water
color sketches made by students in the
summer class of Professor Myron
Chapin. They will be shown in the
ground floor corridor.
In the library of the second floorr
of the same building may be seen
studies for mural decorations made in
the classes of Professors Valerio and
Chapin.

NOTICE
WANTED: for rest of summer, stu-
dent to earn room and brea.kfasts
for part time driving. Call Mrs.
Frank E. Jones, 721 Tappan. 6105.
WANTED: Experienced driver to
drive car to New York at close of
summer school. Phone 6892 or
4121 (Ex. 2180.)
CAN TAKE several men to Minneap-
olis $5, South Dakota $6, forth
Dakota $7. Call 22491. Ask for Dave.
Fred Clarke, who managed the
Pittsburgh Pirates to a world chat-
pionship in 1909, calls his place at
Winfield, Kas., the "Little Pirate"
ranch.
TYPING SUPPLIES
PAPER - RIBBONS - CARBONS
RI D E R'S
3-otaSothste Street .,

Hour of Recitation
8 9 10
Time of Examination
Thurs. Fri Thurs.
8-10 8-10 2-4
Mourof Recitation
1 2 3 A

11
Fri.
2-4
ll other
Hours
Fri.
4-6

MAJESTIC

MATINEES 25c
NIGHTS, Balcony 25c, M. Floor 35c

Thurs.
4-6

Time of Examination
Thurs. Fri.
10-12 10-12

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON - Tradition and circumstances
thus far combining to indicate beyond reason-
able doub' President Roosevelt's renomination,
Democratic political intelligence aides have to
roam into the 1940 sector when they cogitate
over who might be growing to "new deal" heir-
apparent stature. You always can get them to
talk about that, off the record. It affords them
diversion from more immediate problems as to the
'36 campaign.
A canvass of such opinion at this stage indi-
^ates that no one in the cabinet or on the alpha-
betical administrator roster, past or present, yet
looms as a 1940 possibility, let alone probability.
No Democratic governpr, senator or house member
appears to these frankly cynical and utterly prac-
tical party observers as challenging special atten-
tion with the 1940 presidential nomination in
mind. The "new deal" as they see it still is a
one man show. It is just Franklin "DeLAY-no"
Roosevelt, as that name always sounds on Huey
Long's tongue.
AVOIDING JEALOUSIES
MR. ROOSEVELT appears to these ringside spec-
tators to have made his appointments and
juggled big assignments #mong them with the
specific purpose of avoiding internal jealousies
over "crown prince" rivalries. He repeatedly has
rewarded good work by heaping bigger and heavier
jobs on willing shoulders; but never to the point
of singling any of his chief lieutenants out for ad-
ministration "fair-haired-boy" status.
From the start, a Rooseveltian system of "intra-
new deal" checks and balances has served to keep
any particular "new dealer" of first rank from
getting his head very far above his fellows. The
President quite likely had that method in mind
when he first made his famous reference to his
own position as captain-quarterback of a team.
The selection of Roosevelt Republicans for such
key cabinet posts as agriculture and interior was
just a starter.
THE F. D. R. METHOD
STRIKING example of this Roosevelt method
of keeping anyone from getting too big for his
boots was the original recovery act administration
set-up. To the known disappointment of General
Johnson, Scretary Ickes took over the public
works side and Secretary Wallace and Dr. Tug-
well the food industry end of the code-making
business. Another instance was the Hull-Peek
Jivision of the foreign trade expansion effort.
rhe most obvious and noteworthy example of the
tot, probably, is the triple-check division of work-
relief administration authority among Hopkins,
Ickes and Walker. No one is patently top ser-
geant.
President Wilson once remarked on the curious
tact he repeatedly had observed among the men
he named to high Federal office. While some

Michigan Dames will hold the Sum-
mer Session's last auction and bridge
party for student wives at the League,
this afternoon. Playing b e g i n s
promptly at 2 o'clock. Each player
is requested to bring a white ele-
phant" for prizes.

FOR RENT
TO RENT: To faculty member or
graduate student for school year
1935-'36, a suite of sitting-room
with fireplace, piano, built in book-
cases, and double bed-room with
private lavatory, and garage. Dial
9524. No. 70.
FOR RENT: MODERN APT. WITH
LIVING-ROOM, BEDROOM, KIT-
CHENETTE AND BATH. WELL
FURNISHED, CONVENIENTLY
LOCATED AT 1106 WILLARD.
GROUND F L O OR. PRIVATE
ENTRANCE. AVAILABLE AFTER
AUGUST 17 UNTILL SEPT. 24 OR
FOR WEEKENDS B E T W E E N
THOSE DATES. FOR INFORMA-
TION CALL 6539.

in JAC
CA
yoI

THE THRILL HIT OF THE SUMMER!
LRK
G 1ABLE
K LONDON'S greatest story
"LL~d theiL
E T T A with JACK
UNG OAKIE

s

__.. .. . .ee.

11

I

11

II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan