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August 09, 1935 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1935-08-09

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L9y 1935

iL41 M CIAGAN DAILY

OM

German Edicts
Hit At Masons
And Veterans
Fraternal Lodges Will Be
iped Out Completely;
Press Attacks Jews
BERLIN, Aug. 8. - (P)--The end of
all Free Masonic lodges in Germany
and the abolition of more World War
veterans' organizations were an-
nounced , today.
Reichsfuehrer Hitler's newspaper,
Voelkischer Beobachter, stated that
on Saturday the last Masonic lodges
in the.Reich, the State lodge, and the
"German Brethren chain" of Leipzig
Will be dissolved.
Secret police today dissolved the
veterans' "Steel Helmet" formations
in Berlin, Brandenburg, Pommerania,
and Eastern Mark, the territory along
the western ridge of Pomorze, Po-
land.
Proprty Seized
. The dissolution of the veteran units'
was accomplished on the basis of the
law of Feb. 28, 1933, for the protec-
tion of the people and the state. The
property of the Steel Helmet units
was seized.
After dissolution of the old Prus-
sian Free Mason lodge July 21 and
the gradual disappearance of smaller
lodges in a year-long campaign, the
Free Masons in Germany - first so-
.galled "state enemies" --thus would
,e wiped out completely.
Hitler's organ, asserting the secret
aim of Free Masonry was a Jewish
world republic, said the forthcoming
dissolution would "finish a special
chapter in world history, and the
guardian of the Nazi ideal will be
alert."
Jews accused of trying to hide their
race to escape anti-Semitism ap-
peared to stand in the center of Nazi
determination to purify German
blood.
Score: Baptism
Der Angriff, newspaper of Dr. Paul
Joseph Goebbels, minister of propa-
ganda, directed an attack against
Jews covering up by becoming Chris-
tians, and asked how much longer the
Protestant church would continue to
baptise Jews.
How to hold down prices was still
puzzling officials, while two more
stahlhelm (steel helmt) veterans un-
its disappeared -one by edict and
the other "voluntarily."
One butcher shop was closed at
Herborn because its proprietor boost-
ed the price of sausage. Nine shops
were threatened with forced closures,
but the other eight merchants agreed
to lower their prices.
Hunt Continues
For Body Of
Nebraska Youth
Companion Tells Of Fatal
Plunge From Lindbergh
Mountain Peak
CAMP CHEF OURAY, Colo., Aug.
8 (-WP) --Weary men searched near
Lindbergh peak today for the body
of William Brode, 15, as a youthful
companion told with trembling lips
of their fatal assault on a treacher-
ous mountainside.
The body of the scion of an old
Memphis, Tenn., family was believed
lodged beyond sight, and possibly be-
yond recovery, in a funnel shaped
crevice into which he plummeted
late Tuesday.
Robert Henderson, also 15, of
Omaha, Neb., had directed mountain

men to the spot after he had been
found, badly cut about the feet by
sharp rocks and almost incoherent,
after running for help.
"Brode suddenly fell," Henderson
said. "He hit the mountain twice.
I calledand called to him but he
never answered me."
The lads were de&scending a moun-
tain adjoining Lindbergh peak, when
their attention was distracted by a
soundas of falling rocks. A moment
later Brode lost his footing.
Brode's weak heart had caused him
to be left fishing at Monarch lake
Tuesday while other members of a
Y.M.C.A. summer camp were taken on
a supervised mountain climb.
Shortly afterward he and Hender-
son started out. Whether they reach-
ed the top of the height where death
came to the youth was not clear from
Henderson's broken story.
They were descending at a point
about 3,000 feet above surrounding
terrain at the time of the accident.
OUZENS UNDER KNIFE
DETROIT, Aug. 8. - P) - Mayor
Frank Couzens said today that his
fathe'r, Senator James E. Couzens,
underwent his third operation at Ro-
chester, Minn., last night. He was
informed his father was doing as
well as could be expected.
The operation resulted from a
sudden decision by the senator's phys-
icians after Mayor Couzens had left
his father's bedside yesterday to
motor back to Detroit.

As Joe Louis Knocked Out Levinsky In The First Round

-Associated Press Photo.
Kingfish Levinsky, who in his day has faced the best of them, found himself no equal for Detroit's bomb-
ing heavyweight, Joe Louis, in their fight at Comiskey Park, Chicago. Louis sent Levinsky bouncing to the
canvas four times in tho first round before he stayed there, informing the referee he wanted no more. The
Kingfish is shown here down for the last time as Louis waved away by the referee.

Utilities Award
Insull Pension
Of $57 A Day
Deposed Ruler Of Power
And Money Empire Is In
The MoneyAgain
CHICAGO,, Aug. 8. - (P) - Samuel
Insull, deposed head of a two billion
dollar public utility empire, is as-
sured of a daily income of almost
$57.50 for the rest of his life.
At the height of his career, Insull
was reported to have been paid more
than $500,000 or $1,370 daily, in Sal-
aries by the numerous companies he
directed.
Three Chicago companies, which he
formerly headed, yesterday reinstated
him on their pension rolls, from which
he was removed 17 months ago after
he fled the country in an attempt to
avoid trial for mail fraud. He later
returned and was acquitted of all
criminal charges.
Announcement of his reinstatement
was made by James Simpson, chair-
man of the boards of the Common-
wealth Edison Co., the Peoples Gas,
Light & Coke Co., and the Public
Service Co. of Northern Illinois.
As a result of their action, Insull
again receives an annual pension of
$21,000 and $33,250 in a lump sum to
cover payments which accrued since
his name was dropped.
Morgentat nGiven
Lay]in 's Resignation
WASHINGTON, Aug. 8.-(P) -
Secretary Morgenthau today an-
nounced the resignaton of J. G. Lay-
lin, assistant general counsel of the
treasury, but declined to say whether
itwas actuated by disagreement over
treasury policies.
Senator Vandenberg (Rep., Mich.),
told the Senate yesterday he "under-
stood" Laylin had written a "blister-
ing" letter to Morgenthau asserting
he "would have no part in repudia-
tion" of gold clause contracts.
Morgenthau said Laylin had sub-
mitted a formal letter of resignation.
He added that Laylin orignally joined
the department for two years and had
stayed in excess of that time. He
said, further, he had been offeredpo-
sitions with three different law firms.
"If he wants to give out his letter
of resignation he may do so," Mor-
genthau added.
TALE OF TWO MULES
CREEDMORE, N. C., Aug. 8. -- (P)
-Kate and Maud loved each other,
if ever a pair of mules did. A year ago
Kate was killed by lightning, and
Maud was grief-stricken. The other
day lightning claimed Maud as a vic-
tim.

-Associated Press Photo
In what party leaders described
as a repudiaton of President Roose-
velt's New Deal, Charles F. Risk
(above) of Saylesvlle, .R. I., a Re-
publican, was elected representative
from Rhode Island ever the Demo-
cratic candidate, by nearly 13,000
votes. The special election was re-
qured to fill a vacancy.

A New Deal Enemy

Shirley In Honolulu

-Associated Press Photo.
Shirley Temple, child movie star,
displayed her dimples to 10,000 per-
sons who came to greet her when
she arrved at Honolulu with her
parents for a vacation. Informed
she liked flowers, her admirers sent
bushels of them to -the boat.

-Associated Press Photo.
Jc' Lo'iid, the Dark Dynamiter from Detroit, unloosed all the power in his bombing hands and punched
£in:z Le'vi-uky of Chicago into helplessness and oblivion in less than one round of their scheduled ten-
fc et in Chicago. Here the ex-fish peddler is shown sagging in the opes just before he dropped to the
113cr and akcd the referee to stop the fight.

In

III

Sociometry Tests Act As Guide
In Migration Community Plans

NEW YORK, Aug. 8. - (AP) - A new
social science, sociometry, which
measures human inter-relations, of-
fers a guide for the migration of com-
munities planned by the Federal re-
settlement administration.
Even some race prejudice barriers
are solved by the tests of sociometry.
These indicate, in planning a migra-
tion, what families to move and
where and how they will fit happily
into a new community.
Thousands of families face reset-
tlement in the Tennessee valley proj-
ect. There are other groups waiting
in nearly every state for transfer to
rural regions to better land or to
industrial communities.
Sociometry is the idea of J. L.
Moreno, M.D., of New York, a leader
in psychiatry. He began this work
in war-time Austria in communities
transplanted bodily to new areas. He
has continued in the United States
until his methods have been studied
in communities totalling, here and
abroad, about 40,000 persons.
Selection Of Neighbors
These methods he explans in a
book, "Who Shall Survive?" written
with the collaboration of Miss Helen
Jennings of the New York State
Training School for Girls.
The sociometry test is deceptively
simple. It has attracted attention
to social-economic leaders because
it tells them in a few hours social
facts that might take years to learn.
As an example, Dr. Moreno cites
a new community with room for 250
families, for which applications have
been made by 750 families in three
different, old communities. The so-
ciometry investigator, assembling the
applicants of one community, says:
"You may have something to say
about the people you would like to
live with. No outsider can ever guess
these wants of yours."
They write first choice of families
of their own community they would
prefer for neighbors in the new one.
Other choices are written. Other
preferences in work, race or religion

nificant chains, in preferences lead-
ing ultimately to this head.
The map shows socially balanced
structures. These are groups that
take years to build, that cannot be
replaced, whose breakup risks fail-
ure in a new community. Such
groups may be transferred bodily in
the migration.
Cannot Be Tarnsferred
They cannot be transferred suc-
cessfully when their leaders are an-
tagonistic. This principle of group
leader liking is used to select the
social units from the other two com-
munities which might combine hap-
pily in the new settlement.
The sociometry chart is perhaps
the first successful test of popula-
tions. It holds sutprises, particularly
about race prejudices.
Sociometry shows there is no real
'prejudice' until the saturation point
of that particular group is reached.
This saturation point -the rejec-
tion of any more persons of a par-
ticular race, creed or nationality -
arrives when the dominant group
no longer has economic need for
more of the minority group.
Thus in the test, negroes are often
welcome additions to migrating com-
munities. Jews may be welcomed by
a non-Jewish group, which frowns on
entry of other nationalities or creeds.
This sociometric saturation point
is fluid. It changes from time to
time. With it "prejudices" ebb or
rise.
MOTION ASKS NEW TRIAL
PONTIAC, Aug. 8. - (P) - A re-
newal motion for a new trial for An-
son Best, serving a life term in the
Michigan branch prison at Marquette,
was on file today.
Best was convicted of slaying Vera
Schneider, Pontiac telephone opera-I
tor, in 1920.
__al_______-- l

Juvenile Stars
To Be Featured
In Floor Show
(Continued from Page 1)
zenmeyer made his Ann Arbor debut
when he was featured as the soloist
in the Freshman Mardi Gras last
year. In addition to the show, Al=
Cowan's band has arranged several
novelty selections.
The list of hostesses for tonight's
dance includes: Maude Airey, Jo-
sephine Allensworth, Dorothy Arm-
strong, Kay Bevis, Jane Biddle, Cath-
erine Burns, Helen Bush, Peg Conklin,
Thelma Cooper, Mary Helen Davis,
Mary Alice Emmett.
Edith Forsythe, Margarite Garber,
Dorothy Gies, Mary Ellen Hall, Eileen
Ischeldinger, Pearl Ischeldinger, Se-
fora Messing, Louise Paine, Elva Pas-
coe, Jennie Rosenthal, E mm a
kSchmidt, Vivian Springer, Sophie
Stolarski.
Frances Thornton, Violet Villany,
Rita Wellman, Dorothy Wikel, and
Laura Jane Zimmerman.

FINAL

SlUlMMER

ALL IN THE
MAIN STORE

Starts

String, Wool, Pastel and
Corduroy Novelty Weaves
Values tox$8.95 Values to $8.95
$3.95 $395

CAMEL HAIR

THREE STROOKS, GENUINE
$29.75 VALUES . . . . . . . . .

3 WHITE and PASTEL SUITS. 1/2 PRICE

IRI

DRESSES

AUGUST

..

ALL WHITE, PASTEL and CHIFFON DAYTIMES. . ............ .. ONE-HALF PRICE
COTTON DAYTIME, AFTERNOON FORMALS, and SPORT, Values to $10.95. $.95
ONE GROUP OF VALUES TO $3.95 ......................:.............. $1.95
NINE CREPE and ORGANDY FORMALS, Values to $19.95 .................... $6.00

The Month of Specials
at MILTONS
2-Piece Summer
TROPICAL SUITS
$9.00 and $12.15
3-Piece
SUMMER SUITS
and $17.90
Sport Shoes .... $2.95
Collarized Shirts$1 .29
Summer Caps .. 43c and 87c
Monito Hose 3pr.for $1.00
SuimmerIt H+ c M pr 1; 49

I

ACCESSORY DEPARTMENT

All Seersucker - Silk
LOUNGING PAJAMAS

- and Satin................... .
AND ROBES .............- - ....-.. ---..* *' *

Seersucker
PLAY SUITS

One Last Group of Broken Sizes in SHORTS, SLACKS,
c --- SPORT SHIRTS; COTTON and LINEN BLOUSES- c

SKIRTS

PIQUE and LINEN,
Value to $2.95

I

One Lot of PLAIN PASTEL; also WOOL, NAVY, BROWN and SHEPHERD CHECK, 1 Price
One Lot of Navy, Brown and Pastel 25% Discount on all remaining
GLOVES. .. 12 Price COSTUME JEWELRY
Flowers and Neckwear drastically
Reduced! Eight Beach Hats ... 50c Each
CREPE, GEORGETTE and LACE BLOUSES .......................ONE-HALF PRICE

FOR SALE

1111

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