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August 08, 1935 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-08-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1935

if, u.1r r i i rm -

AROUND
THE TOWN

"090

By RUSSEL F. ANDERSON
Yesterday . . . we did not wander about the
town . . .. but spent our time racing across the
state and back again. . . in order to do a "cover"
on the Louis-Levinsky fight .... we're still wonder-
ing who won . ... we know who lost . . .. we did..
. there was only one thing wrong with our doping.
. we picked the wrong round .... the wrong
time . . . . and the wrong man . . . . and thus
e we're out good flat . . .. for a good fight!
** * *
Upon our arrival back in Ann Arbor . . . . we
noted a communication in the "Soap Box" .... ad-
vocating something or other about co-education.
. . . . "When they take co-education away from
the schools, what will follow?" . . . . we repeat ....
e "What will follow?" . . . . WE WILL.
0 On the road back we picked, up a hitch-hiker
,s . . . a University of Toledo student . . . with a
7 Doctor's degree in philosophy . . . . he told us
something that we've been wondering about for
a long time . . . just what is the difference be-
tween a university and an asylum .... according to
1 him .... "you have to show improvement to get
out of an asylum!"
Riding with us on the trip was Bill Read ....
Y Sport Editor .... for the Michigan Daily for the
coming year .... he told us about this story ... .
that happened in the University journalism de-
partment . . . . within the last few weeks . . . . it
seems that the budding would-be journalist had
submitted a manuscript . .. which the instructor
p criticized unmercifully . . . . in fact he was so
r critical that the student burst out .. . . "You never
wrote a news story! You don't know a thing
about it! The man who writes ought to know
more about it than the man who never worked
on a newspaper!" . . .. the response of that in-
structor ought to go down in history ... . "Young
man, .....I never laid an egg, either, but I can
tell a good egg from a bad one a helluva lot easier
than the hen who laid it!"
Just as we were pounding out the finish to this
late last night . . . . just before dead-line . .
"Pat" Conger of the Detroit Free Press .... came in
.. with a report from the downtown precinct of
Ann Arbor police station . . . . according to him
. . . . "a boy nine-years old was bitten today by a
Collie-dog owner, Elmer Roe, of Ann Arbor" .. .
fat first we thought it was the realization of the
mythical news-story , , , , we were quickly let
down with the further information . . . . that the
desk-sargeant . . . had worded the report that
1 way . . . . forgetting to put in the period after
'dog.'
* * * *
More repercussions from the Bauer case here
last week . . . . this particular incident proving
. . .. that no matter how secluded .... you are
never safe from a newspaper man .... at 7 a.m.
last Wednesday .... a reporter for a Detroit news-
paper . . . . was to be seen in a showerbath at the
Jennings House .... almost before the police knew
about the murder .... NOT taking a shower, how-
ever much needed . . . . but quizzing Dr. Ahnel
Castro, a friend of Bauer, who lived there . . .
x.ho was taking the shower while being inter-
viewed.

The SOAP BOX
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily." Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
'rhe names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked
to be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words and to accept or reject
iettcrs upon th criteria of general editorial importance
and interest to the campus.
'Vinegar Puss' Meows
To the Editor:
Never in my life have I heard of a more asinine
ruling than the late University edict relative to
Saturday classes. More and more it appears to be
"the thing" at this University to baby the student
body, regimenting them as though they were a
herd of mavericks.
Why not have feeding pens for our little boys
and girls? Why not serve graham crackers, hot
porridge, and milk at the 2 o'clock classes? "The
schedule for every student must include instruc-
tion given on Saturdays, unless excused from this
requirement by the special committee on exemp-
tions." Such bunk!
How many gold stars do we get if we have all
our classes on Saturdays?
Vinegar Puss.
'The Workingman's Salvation'
Dear Editor:
Some one told me today that a couple of drys
wrote into the "Soap Box" lately ,all boined up
over a measly beer ad. I didn't know there were
that many drys left. They must be school teach-
ers or ministers from North Carolina or Kansas.
No Michigander with a grain of intelligence would
write such absurd letters to Soapy. We have shown
emphatically that we're for beer, wine, whiskey,
rum, and everything else. Those Kansan sissies
can go home pretty soon to their Sahara, and
keep cool the rest of the summer on pop. But we
Michiganders will continue toguzzle our beer. In
case they don't think we're nearly unanimous on
this issue just have them ask the regular term
students. Nine out of ten will tell you that they're
glad' that the "prohibition" that didn't prohibit is
gone and gone forever. Only the fanatic and
dizzy dry such as "Indignant" would deny a swelt-
ering nation a glass of cold beer; the working-
man's salvation and the student's delight. And
who can deny that repeal (and the New Deal)
started the ball rolling towards prosperity by
creating a lot of new jobs. So don't either of the
other drys on the campus this summer write in
nutty letters; the heat is bad enough.
Cordially.
O. K. T.
F. M. Sticks Out His Neck
To the Soap Box:
This article is the result of certain conclusions
made through observations and experiences in
and about colleges of three types; those for men,
those for women, and those co-educational. Final-
ly at the University of Michigan, faults of one
type are found so much in evidence that silence
is submission to an outworn concept in education.
The deficiencies of co-education enter into one
retarding influence upon the learning capacities
cf men and women, namely, in each case, the pres-
ence of the opposite sex. These deficiencies are, no
doubt, more or less apparent to college students
according to length of time spent in such insti-
tutions. Up to the present, the advance of wom-
en's customs in dress and decorum has been much
too rapid for the mind of the average male.
A primary concern of the young college man
of today is the problem of forcing himself to be-
come a workable unit in a badly functioning society.
For these men, women are of secondary concern.
Being human, a few clever ones are able to ad-
just themselves to the charms of surrounding co-
eds. The remainder, a large majority, are much
less fortunate and with their nemesis present a
conspicuous quality of childishness on every co-ed-
ucational college campus.
The system itself may not be at fault, since such
a state of affairs requires the presence of deter-
mined women and susceptible men. Consequently
it might be unjust to attack co-education were it

not for the fact that there are only two methods
by which the detriments of the system can be re-
moved from the University; one to end it entirely,
the other to change human nature. Almost cer-
tain social philosophies of the future point to a
continued conflict between college men and women.
On the one hand there will always be the ambi-
tious college man fighting for a place in critical
society; on the other will be the co-ed with either
of three objectives, marriage, success through
college contacts, or the finding of a career by the
self-sufficient method. These "career women"
may be few in number but of an inestimable
value to society. For the good of all their proper
place is in a woman's college of high entrance re-
quirements.
No educational institution in this country has a
monopoly on learning, but, from the basis of rare
contribution to American progress in all fields, an
oral survey seems to indicate men and women
from non-co-educational colleges and from insti-
tutions where men and women were fairly well
segregated, as being the most valuable.
One object of a college should be to give its
students the very best facilities available for edu-
cation while at the same time it should make a
forceful effort to limit or remove anything pre-
venting the student from successfully taking ad-
vantage of those facilities. Co-education is just one
of those things!
-F. M., Jr.
One and five-mill coins would be two more items
for a woman on a bus to dredge out of a purse by
mistake for a dime.
-The Detroit News.

-, Al

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

IL

FOR SALE
---------
FOR SALE: Antiques, glassware, fur-
niture, jewelry, doll furniture, books.
many other miscellaneous items.
408 S. Seventh St. (Near W. Lib-
erty). Dial 7068.
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
FOR SALE: Antique jewelry, brace-
lets, brooches, earrings, etc. Rea-
sonable. Phone 8050. 2020 Dev-
onshire Road. 5x
NOTICE
DRIVING TO GREAT FALLS, Mon-
tana, Aug. 18th or 20th. Can take
1 or 2 passengers to Chicago, Min-
neapolis, Great Falls or other points
en route. Driving 1935 Plymouth.
Share expenses. Call at 306 East
Liberty, or call 7023.
MR. AND MRS. HOMER GRAFTON
announce a post-season family
camp at beautiful Lake Timagami,
Ontario, Canada, August 25 to
Sept. 10. An ideal vacation for the
entire family. Specially trained
counselors for both boys and girls.
Instruction in allhwater sports-
also fishing and camping trips. Call
8187.
WANTED
WANTED: For next school year, 2-
room apartment. Kitchenette, first
floor. Near Law Quadrangle. Write
Box 20, Mich. Daily.
ADVERTISING - Copywriter, layout
man wishes part-time employment
with local stores starting in Fall.
Low monthly salary expected, ex-
cellent references. Will show
samples of work. Box 42.
FOR RENT
UNUSUAL apartment: two rooms,
kitchenette, bath, suitable for two
or three graduate men. 540 Wal-
nut.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. lx
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006,
4x
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: A pair of silver-rimmed glasses
in a brown case. Call R. A. Choate
at 3506.
Terrace Garden
! Dancing Studio
Instructions i n a 11
forms. Classical, social,
dancing. Ph. 9695.
uerth Theatre Bldg.
SWEETHEARTS

_
I
r

BERKELEY,
--Want to see

Resurrection Made Simple
By Refrineration Method

Calif., Aug. 7. - ,P)
what the world looks

like 100 years or even 1,000 years
from now?
The time may come, says Dr. Rob-
ert E. Cornish. Berkeley scientist,
when a man may do so simply by go-
ing to a laboratory, having himself
frozen solid, and put away with a tag
indicating when he wishes to be
thawed out.
Dr. Cornish's experiments last year
in reviving dogs put to death clinical-
ly attracted wide attention.
The possibility of a century-nap
was brought up during his comments
today on experiments in which Dr.
Ralph Willard, Hollywood gland re-
search specialist, revived a monkey
after it had been frozen for three
days.
Dr. Cornish said Dr. Williard's
work opened up great possibilities.
"It has been known for years you
can freeze young fish, then thaw
them out, and they will recover en-
tirely. Dr. Willard is the first to do
it with warm-blooded animals.
"This experiment makes it possible
to take a man of, say 40 years of age,
inject sodium citrate into his blood,
freeze him, and put him away for a
thousand years, or as long as he is
kept frozen very cold to prevent

changes in the body. Then thaw
him out and he would go on living."
He explained the sodium citrate was
necessary to keep the blood from
clotting which, he said, was apparent-
ly the fatal thing when a person
freezes to death.
STICK TO DOGUCRACKERS
Dogs may suffer from a form of
shell-shock from firecracker explo-
sions or other sudden noises.
Opening of Lafayette bridge at
Georgetown, S. C., marked the com-
pletion of the last connecting link
on U.S. Highway No. 17 from Maine
to Florida.
ENDS TONIGHT
"PRIVATE WORLDS"
and
"$10 RAISE"
Friday - Saturday
MAURICE CHEVALIER
"FOLIES BERGERE"
-A C sBplus
WARREN WILLIAM
"Case of the Curious.Bride"

TON IGHT
THE MICHIGAN REPERTORY PLAYERS
AND THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENT
THE FAMOUS LIGHT OPERA
"THE CHOCOLATE
SOLDIER"
MUSIC by OSCAR STRAUS
Chorus of 40 Voices
Orchestra of 24 pcs.
Hit Songs:
MY HERO
FALLING IN LOVE
SYMPATHY
TALE OF A COAT
SPECIAL MATINEE r
Saturday 2:30
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8:30
Prices 75c, 50c & 35c Phone 6300

1

f1

STAGE

r[HERE ARE FEW FORMS of art more enter-
taining than truly sparkling music comedy;
and there are few if any more consummate mas-
ters of music comedy than Oscar Straus. "The
Chocolate Soldier" has been the most favored of
the Straus operettas for half a century and the
choice of it by the Repertory Players for their
seventh production of the Summer Session is in-
deed a sagacious one.
Last night's opening performance of "The Choc-
olate Soldier" at Lydia Mendelssohn Theater of-
fered considerably more than even a most punc-
tilioUs critic could ask of a non-professional effort.
It is an excellent combination of well-trained
voices, superior music and accompaniment, and
striking scenic effects, showing capable direction
and a particularly noticeable verve and sincerity
on the part of all the cast.
If "The Chocolate Soldier" suffers at all, then
its deficiency rests with the acting of the princi-
pals. But their forte is music and comic opera,
lake grand opera, rightfully reserves such poetic
license that truly capable acting is not an actual
necessity. Clarawanda Sisson, as Nadina, Mark
Bills, as Lieutenant Bumerli, and John Toms, in
the role of Alexius, are all possessors of promis-
ing voices. It is Miss Sission who appears to score
most favorably with the audience but, in the mind
of this crictic, Bills has the more mature, the more
articulate, voice of the three. He has had the op-
portunity to appear in last spring's May Festival
and this experience is easily recognizable in his
pleasing baritone. This is not necessarily any
detraction from the work of either Miss Sisson or
Mr. Toms for both sang meritoriously last eve-
ning. In the "Falling in Love," number, the lat-
ter's rich tenor is highly agreeable and when
Nadina sings "My Hero" in the first part the
effect is quite stirring.
Mr. Alexander Wycoff's settings, which have
been splendid in nearly all of the season's plays,
are thoroughly professional in this one and worthy
cf any stage. The exquisite blending of bright
colors in the second part makes the courtyard,
gardens, and exterior of Popoff's house an ideal
scene. The chorus of soldiers in part one and the
finale as well as the dancing peasants at the
-nnn V of n r. fxri-n,-,s- ,n ,--. . I-i n l n ,nn y1 fr

A Paramount picture with
\MARY ELLIS
TULLIG CARMINATJ
I da L up in o
Lynne Overman
Directed by
M IC HIGA N

Read

The Want Ads

MAJESTIC
Two Features

LIONEL
BARRYMORE
"Mark of the
Vampire"

II

I

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