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August 07, 1935 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-08-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7,1935

is the very sensible one made by Avery W. Brund-
age, of the American Olympic committee to th
effect that there is time to reconsider this country'
Olympic attitude if and when the German pledger
have been violated.
The Olympic games are potentially, and have
been actually, the finest breeders of good will in
the associations of nations. The whole history and
spirit of the games has been one dominated by
the ideal of fair play and sportsmanship. But one
act contrary to that code was detected among the
thousands of participants in the 1932 games at
Los Angeles and it is significant that that incident
not only brought forth sincere regrets from the
nation of the offender but even more significant
occasioned no protest on the part of the injured
athlete who was willing that the incident should
go unheralded.
1e With such a tradition built about the "Olympic
In
code" it would take a strained imagination to con-
ceive of the Germans violating their pledge against
discrimination. As a matter of fact, touring teams
from the United States which have visited Ger-
many have brought back reports of courteous and
even enthuiastic welcome, demonstrating the will-
Sirigness of the Germans to abide with the spirit
of the games.
'S
I But a more practical consideration suggests it-
s self. Even with the tide of world opinion turning
y against Italy and its aggressive tactics in Africa,
, Germany still remains in a precarious position with
regard to its international affairs, politically and
't economically. Any violation by the Reich of a
1 code which has become so sacred internationally
would certainly result in an unfavorable attitude
which Germany's leaders could not hope but fore-
see.
Y It is very true that Germany has violated com-
mitments with the Holy See as Commonweal points
out, and that young athletic groups of various
creeds have been disbanded, but it still does not
follow that there is much likelihood of a violation
of 9 compact which has become one of the most
D sacred of international covenants, the "Olympic
L code," coming as it does not from any dominating
r institutions but from a source which should repre-
. sent the best elements in all nations - the ath-
letes.
elThe 'SORAP BOX
te
Y. Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing theseditorial opinion of The
- Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked
e to be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words and to accept or reject
letters upon the criteria of general editorial importance
ancd interest to the campus.
r And This, We Hope, Is Final
d To the Editor:
s Although I am not Scotch, I am more than
shocked and disappointed over the amount of ink
e that has been wasted as a result of so-called "dele-
r terious ads" appearing on the covers of our Student
i Directory. Heretofore I have had great faith in
education as a means of training men and women
n competent to meet the demands of modern society.
But, alas! It seems the product of our schools
has reached no higher attainments than that of
t censoring those who sell advertising space on
d school directories. Can it be that Michigan men
and women are typified by "Indignant" and "Miss
y Candid" and their ilk? All apparently limited in
h their observations on life.
9, If Miss Candid and her co-complainant are so
interested in posterity, it seems to me there are
y more profitable avenues of expressing such inter-
s est than directing the attention of all "Daily"
e readers to beer ads.
11 Perhaps it is beyond their ability to ponder
some of the really important problems that con-
r, front us, and, no doubt, will be passed on to
harass posterity. They might concentrate on the
e problem of inculcating in the product of our
s schools some sense of social and political respon-
*e sibility. Or perhaps, they don't know the war
is over. When the nation is crying for men and
s women, some people seem to be interested only in
- beer ads. May I suggest, Miss Candid, a project
n more worthy of consideration. You might make it
k your life business to interest the educators of our
h country in training statesmen --men and women
s who. look upon public service with some degree
s of devotion and respect. I'm sure your efforts

on behalf of posterity in that direction would
e alleviate the sufferings of posterity more than the
A abolition of beer ads from school directories.
Moreover, I think the "flower of youth" is able
to cope with any influence beer ads may have
on appetite. I have always thought that education
made one less gullible; less subjective to the influ-
ence of advertisements. Perhaps Miss Candid has
remained impervious to educational influences,
le and feeling the influence of ever-beckoning beer
vl ads, has deemed it high time to express her resent-
r ment on behalf of herself and other "weaklings."
- If Miss Candid would pursue her method of
- preserving our youth, I suppose that advertising
ad space would be limited to resolutions passed by
pseudo-protective associations. Why not deny
y advertising space to face powder, aspirin, and even
the well-advertised beverage - Coca Cola?
1- Speaking of horrid habits, does not Miss Candid
.e realize that more premature deaths are caused by
y over-eating than any other single cause? Why not
ban all food advertising? But I suppose any ra-
- tional appeal to Miss Candid and her kind is
>f useless.
As to weak characters and nonentities, if re-j
y fraining from beer drinking gives one only theme
0 foresight and life interest sufficient to prompt crit-
o icism of advertising space sold for beer ads, then
- I prefer to be a sot. Although I am in no way
chained to alcoholic beverages, I believe that a
e few glasses of good beer would stimulate me to
e greater social activity and greater thoughts than
e have been expressed by either "Indignant" or
d "Miss Candid."
-C.R.S.
An Englishman and an American woman have

AROUND
THE TOWN... 1
By RUSSELL F. ANDERSON
Yesterday . . . while wandering about the offices
of the English department . . . one of the profes-
sors . . . who works for the extension lecture divi-
sion of the University . . . told us this story .. .
and vouches for its truth . . . it seems that he had
been engaged to lecture in a small town in the
northern part of the state . . . arriving early in
the afternoon . . . he noted that the place was
poorly provided with bills and that the weekly
had little publicity on the coming lecture . . .
desiring to see if the local people knew what was in
store for them . . . he entered a grocery shop ...
.Good afternoon," he said . . . to the man behind
the counter . . . . "Any entertainment going on
here tonight? Anything that will help to while
away an evening?" . . . according to the story ...
the shopkeeper gazed at his interrogator,, wiped
his hands, and then replied slowly . . . "Well, I
expect there's going to be a lecture. I've been
selling eggs all day.".
-* * * *
Our wanderings took us over to one of the dorms
. . yesterday . . . to get some statistical material
from one of the house-mothers . . . you know ...
those kindly white-haired souls . . . who so closely
guard their charges . . . She told us this . . . and
we pass it on . . . it seems that this particular
mother . . . stepped out in the lobby of the dorm
the other evening ... and spoke to a young gentle-
man . . . who was visiting with one of the resi-
dents . . . "Young man, we turn the lights off
at 10:30!" . . . there was a quick response . . . "Oh,
boy, that'll be keen!"
Now here's some material from a contributor
. that really ought to please some of the school
na'ams . . . who are in our midst . . . it is a col-
lection of answers gathered by one "reader" of
examination papers . . . and we pass it on . . .
knowing that unconscious humor is always the
best . . . there's a laugh and a struggle for an
idea in every one. . . . here are the answers given
by young people on entrance exams:
"In the eastern part of Australia cattle can
stand the water better because they have
leather hides."
"Manufacturing is not carried on in Australia
because the people are backward and Australia
was discovered late and it makes the introduc-
tion of machinery difficult."
"The Saar was a place that was in the head-
lines of our newspapers for three weeks."
"Japan wishes to secure Manchukuo so her
people will be able to expand."
"The Saar used to be the King of Russia."
"The chief seaport of Paris is Bologney."
"Great Britain's exports are of two groups --
wool and exiles."
"Religion of India -they believe in idlers."
"A continental shelf is a shallow body of water
where fish come to spoon."
III - I NIPO

SClassied Iirectory+
«~

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Antiques, glassware, fur-
niture, jewelry, doll furniture, books,
many other miscellaneous items.
408 S. Seventh St. (Near W. Lib-
erty). Dial 7068.
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
FOR SALE: Antique jewelry, brace-
lets, brooches, earrings, etc. Rea-
sonable. Phone 8050. 2020 Dev-
onshire Road. 5x
NOTICE
MR. AND MRS. HOMER GRAFTON
announce a post-season family
camp at beautiful Lake Timagami,
Ontario, Canada, August 25 to
Sept. 10. An ideal vacation for the
entire family. Specially trained
counselors for both boys and girls.
Instruction in all water sports -
also fishing and camping trips. Call
8187.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is con-
structive notice to all merbers of
the University. Copy received at the
office of the Summer Session, Room,
1213 A.H. until 3:30; 11:30 Saturday.

WANTED

WANTED: For next school year, 2-3
room apartment. Kitchenette, first
floor. Near Law Quadrangle. Write
Box 20, Mich. Daily.
ADVERTISING - Copywriter, layout
man wishes part-tune employment
with local stores starting in Fall.
Low monthly salary expected, ex-
cellent references. Will show
samples of work. Box 42.
FOR RENT
UNUSUAL apartment: two rooms.
kitchenette, bath, suitable for two
or three graduate men. 540 Wal-
nut.

LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3X
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
4x
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: A pair of silver-rimmed glasses
in a brown case. Call R. A. Choate
at 3506.

OPENING TONIGHT
THE MICHIGAN REPERTORY PLAYERS
AND THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC
present
THE FAMO'US LIGHT OPERA
T" HE C H OCOLATE
MUSIC by OSCAR STRAUS
Chorus of 40 Voices
Orchestra of 24 pcs.
Hit Songs:
MY HERO
FALLING IN LOVE
SYMPATHY
TALE OF A COAT
SPECIAL MATINEE
Saturday 2:30
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8:30
Prices 75c, 50c & 35c Phone 6300

A Washington
BYSTANDER

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON - As father of the Nebraska
one-house legislature plan, Senator George
Norris must be watching with an ironic eye the
various conference committees to which so much
of the administration's program has been com-
mitted. They are providing him daily with fresh
concrete examplec to back his argument against
two-house parliament. Norris' idea in inducing
Nebraska to go to one-house legislation was to
avoid conference committees.
The contention is that bills are shaped in the
two houses; but that laws are written by conference
committees. They get the last word usually as
it takes almost a political mutiny in one house or
the other to reject conference proposals. More-
over, they are closed door affairs. Nobody gets a
detailed report on what is said in conference.
What comes out is leaks, flavored often to suit
the. views of the "leaker." In effect, says Norris,
conferences form a third house and one that
meets only in now politically abhorrent closed
sessions.
,* * * *
HOW THEY WORK
rTHE CONFERENCE on the utility holding com-
pany bill was a striking example of how they
work. It was appointed to wrestle out a compro-
mise between the Senate's "death sentence" ver-
sion and the House non-mandatory move to con-
fer power on the securities commission to dis-
tinguish sheep from goats among power holding
companies and treat them accordingly.
What the conference actually got into a row
about, however, was whether Brain Truster Cohen
should sit in on its deliberations as an aide to
Chairman Wheeler. While the conferees wrangled
about that, the real business of finding a compro-
mise plan waited. Under the Norris one-house
plan, such things could not happen.
* * * *
UNWANTED AUTHORITY
T HERE was something else in the situation of
considerably greater importance. That was
the objections of Chairman Joe Kennedy and his
security commission colleagues to having thrust
upon them any broad, discretionary authority
to behead holding companies found to be unneces-
sary. Here was one government commission, at
least, that did not pine for such vastly increased
powers. Being the fighting Irish type, Kennedy
quite likely sought to do something about it off-
stage.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 7, 1935
VOL. XVI No. 39
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre: The
Michigan Repertory Players and the
School of Music will present Oscar
Straus' "The Chocolate Soldier" to-
night, and Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday nights with a special mati-
nee Saturday afternoon There is no
advance in prices for this show. There
are a few. seats remaining for each
of the night performances and choice
seats for the Saturday matinee. Pa-
trons are urged to make their reserva-
tions early.
The Michigan Dames invite student
wives to the weekly auction and con-
tract bridge party this afternoon, at
the League. Playing beginstpromptly
at 2 o'clock. Please bring ten cents.
National Student League meets to-
night in the Union, Room 302, at 7:30
p.m. There will be a complete dis-
cussion of the recent expulsion of four
members. All invited to attend.
Educational Conference: At 4:10
this afternoon in Room 1022 Uni-
versity High School, Mr. Elmer D.
Mitchell, Associate Professor of
Physical Education, will talk on "Co-
education-in Recreation."
Summer Session French Club: The
last meeting of the Club will take
place tomorrow, Thursday, August 8.
There will be a banquet at 6:45 p.m.
in the "Second Floor Terrace Room,"
Michigan Union. No chrge for
members. Special program. Danc-
ing. Informal.
Those who can come, please notify
Mr. Koella, telephone 3923, not later
than at noon today.
Mathematical Club: Meeting
Thursday, August 8, at 4:15 in Room
3017 A. H. Professor J. W. Bradshaw
will talk on "A certain point trans-
formation in the plane," and Profes-
sor G. Y. Rainich on "A recent .solu-
tion of an old problem in number
theory." Everyone interested is cor-
dially invited.
Graduate School: All Graduate
School students who expect to com-
plete their work for a degree at the
close of the present summer session
should call at the office of the Gradu-
ate School, 1014 Angell Hall, to check
their records and to secure the proper
blank to be used in paying the di-
ploma fee. The fee should be paid
not later than Saturday, August 10.
C. S. Yoakum, Dean.
Graduation Recital: Mr. Charles
Law, Violinist, student of Professor
(Continued on Page 3)
- Today - Thursday
CLAUDETTE COLBERT
"PRIVATE WORLDS"
plus
Edward Everett Horton
"$10 RAISEI
Friday - Saturday
"FOLIES BERGERE"
and
"Case of the Curious Bride"

I
r
l
r
.
,
t
i

-9-.

BRING THE FAMILY

Stage
and Screen
Combined!
Playing Today Only . .. Matinee and Two Night Performances!
First Show Tonight at 6:50, Second at 9:15.
Adults 40c ... Children 1Oc

r.+~*

IH GUARDED MEN WHO DIDN'T DARE

i

21

MAJESTIC
Two Features
LIONEL
BARRYMORE
"Mark of the
Vam ire"

III

11

E11

.U} . ..... S I,

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