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August 06, 1935 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1935-08-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1935

TUEDA, UGUT ,__3

events are to be subordinated to the conflict which
is baldly admitted to be a battle to gain more
4territories under the press of economic and socia
needs is only proof that historical events are but
formative material for the hands of history's fig-
ures.
A Washington
BYSTANDER
By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON - The House Democratic leaders'
idea of enticing perspiring and adjournment-
e hungry colleagues into going along with adminis-
tration plans for the present session by dangling
n before their eyes hopes of a short session next
year, has its points.
If Congress is restive now over prolongation of
this session, what will it be next year when pri-
maries are in the immediate offing? Not many of
e them, particularly the flock of Democratic new-
r comers of the last election or two, many of them
still perching uneasily in seats long regarded as
s unshakably Republican, could expect to conduct
s successful renomination campaigns from Washing-
, ton. They don't get enough chances of front page
notice for that.
t If there is anyone on either side of the aisle
i in the present House, whatever his continuous
service, so certain at this moment of coming back
as to dare adopt the Texas Jack Garner method
cf campaigning, the press gallery knows him not.
Garner, it will be recalled, before he reluctantly
surrendered his treasured speakership for the vice-
president's Senate gavel, patented a device of his
own for campaign purposes. He never made
speeches, and usually stayed out of his Texas dis-
trict during campaigns. He remained in the House
30 years, but who else ever did it that way?
~' * * *
CONGRESSMEN'S WORRY
WHATEVER the worry of House members today
about the condition of their political home
fences, it will be thrice sharpened early next
spring. A leadership pledge to release them from
Washington duty in April next year must sound
sweet to their ears.
There is another angle to it, however. Does
that short-term-next-year idea involve also a plan
to extend the next session at the other end? Is
a plan for a fall special session running into the
1 regular session which starts next January defi-
s nitely on the administration agenda?
Probably not, yet there are signs it might be in
- reserve. It would depend, presumably, on what
- this session does to the White House program.
V If it fails to turn out the legislation deemed by
the President as essential now for economic, social
I or . . . above all . . . political reasons, a trip back
to Washington a month or two before the January
- session is called to order is what every member
r can expect. ...
t RODE DOWN RESOLUTIONS
z AN INDICATION of that, consider what hap-
pens in the Senate to the little Republican
gestures about immediate adjournment. They were
sponsored by Senator Hastings. When he con-
ceived the idea and offered his resolution for ad-
journment on August 10 regardless of what the
White House said, no doubt the Republican cam-
paign chief in the Senate hoped at most to foment
dissatisfaction over the administration's working
schedule in Democratic Senate ranks. There never
was any real chance of adoption of the resolution.
Marshalled by Senator Joe Robinson, the Demo-
crats rode down the Hastings resolutions by rous-
ing majorities. They even had Republican irregu-
lar aid while Hastings got no support from New
s Dealers except Senator Hi Johnson of California,
s Roosevelt Republican. Why Johnson so voted he
didn't say.
1.

I

The SOAP BOX
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked
to be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words and to accept or reject
letters upon the criteria of general editorial importance
and interest to the campus.
We'll Take Vanilla
Dear Editor:
These words represent an attempt to interpret
the Student directory front cover beer advertise-
ment Indignant affair.
When two "normal" minds disagree or come
into conflict so strongly, there must be a funda-
mental reason why. And since, as far as the
"wets" or the "drys" or even as far as beer
proper is concerned my "philosophy" necessarily
makes me an impartial one, I feel that I am
qualified at least to try to uncover that reason
why.
First, just what did Indignant say? I am almost
sure he did not express his personal resentment
against seeing a beer advertisement on the front
cover of the Student Directory, i.e., he did not re-
volt at the advertisement's appearance because to
him beer is a "foul liquid"-he may be an ardent
prohibitionist, but he did not express a personal
grievance. Just wait, listen ....
Do you believe that Indignant writes a personal
protest to all of the magazine that carry fully page
beer advertisements, and at the most efficient
places? (For this advertisement perhaps does not
cecupy the most advantageous section in the Stu-
dent Directory; why, "Amused and Sorry for You"
didn't even notice it!) If you believe so, you are
mistaken. He realizes that it is quite childish
to express personal grievances in such a manner;
(moreover, we must not be so sure that less per-
sonal term than "Disgusted" or "Dr. B.B.C." or the
expression "Amused and Sorry for You." .. .
It is just as false to believe that Indignant had
the "moral breakdown of youth" in mind .
Well then, if Indignant spoke, he must have had
something in mind . . .; what urged him to speak?
Let me tell you of my experience.
I can't afford a Student Directory. The first
and only time I saw a Student Directory was when
I glanced at one that was lying on a drug store
counter. And what went through my head when I
saw that front cover? Well, a somewhat more
repulsive reaction that if I had noticed a book
advertised. I felt an urge to express a certain
universal -disappointment; for, I can't help re-
membering the many beer drinking parties that I
hear college fellows discuss, every time I see a beer
advertisement. Beer is not permitted to be sold
on the campus side of our Ann Arbor, yet the
University's Student Directory beckons its boys to
beer, beer, beer. Really, it is surprising how many
groups of boys I have heard discussing beer drink-
ing "parties" . . .That's what went through my
mind: "a feeling of conscience" that "we" ought
to have a more conscience-made-to-order set of
values for, oh, shall we sa'y decency, or shall we
say conservatism, or shall we say liberalism. In
other words, though we even see beauty in an
advertisement of beer or cigarettes or health shoes
or corsets or automobiles--"we" do not feel that
it is appropriate to have that advertisement on
the front cover of the Student Directory. I wish
I knew why we feel so. Indignant's fault was
his failure to explain why he felt so. He wrote
a clumsy, inefficient because incomplete protest.
So it seems that the "fundamental reason why"
for the conflict between Indignant and Disgusteds,
incor., is this: that the corporation did not try,
or if it tried then it failed, to understand what
a person who has a calm sense of appropriateness
would experience when he sees a beer advertise-
ment on the front cover of a University's Student
Directory (for which, by the way, he might have
paid 45c). Also, perhaps, that the corporation's
minds were to alert for a chance to sing praises of
beer, and to shout boos at one who says that for
him beer is foul, not because to him its taste is
disagreeable, but because the word arouses so many
foul (and this time in the true sense of the word)
memories of college boys who, having heard of
beer, followed the advertisement and drank to ex-
cess and committed sins to be repented for-in
spite of the "fact" that modern youth knows what

is good for it and the way to take care of itself.
-L. D.
BOO0KS

i.. C

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is con-
structive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received at the
office of the Summer Session, Room,
1213 A.H. until 3:30; 11:30 Saturday.

Classified Directory

.- --. . ,

L'4

TUESDAY, AUG. 6, 1935
VOL. XVI No. 38
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre: The
Michigan Repertory Players and the
School of Music will present Oscar
Straus' "The Chocolate Soldier" on
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday nights of this week with a
special matinee Saturday afternoon.
There is no advance in prices for this
show. There are a few seats remain-
ing for each of the night perform-
ances and choice seats for the Satur-
day matinee. Patrons are urged to
make their reservations early.
Demonstration Debate: A debate on
the Nationalization, of Munitions
1935-36 debate question in the Mich-
igan High School Forensic Associa-
tion, will be held at 7:30 p.m.4203
Angell Hall, today. All interested
are invited to attend.
Members of the faculty and stu-
dents of the department of physical
education will meet for the farewell
luncheon at the Michigan Union to-
day. Prof. J. L. Brumm will be the
speaker.
Members of Phi Delta Kappa will
have a luncheon at the Michigan
Union today at 12:00.
Educational Conference: Dr. George
E. Myers, Professor of Vocational Ed-
ucation and Guidance, will speak this
afternoon at 4:10 in Room 19022
University High School on the topic
"A Study of Recent Graduates Who
Have Prepared to Teach."
The Michigan Dames invite student
wives to the weekly auction and con-
tract bridge party, Wednesday after-
noon, August 7, at the League. Play-
ing begins promptly at 2 o'clock.
Please bring ten cents.
Graduate School: All Graduate
School students who expect to com-
plete their work for a degree at the
close of the present summer session
should call at the office of the Gradu-
ate School, 1014 Angell Hall, to check
their records and to secure the proper
blank to be used in paying the di-
ploma fee. The fee should be paid
not later than Saturday, August 10.
C. S. Yoakum, Dean.
For the last two weeks of the Sum-
mer Session there will be no band
concerts or Tuesday evening pro-
grams by the Faculty of the School
of Music.
Summer Session French Club: The
last meeting of the Club will take
place Thursday, August 8. There
will be a banquet at 6:45 p.m. in the
"Second Floor Terrace Room," Mich-
igan Union. No charge for members.
Special program. Dancing. Inform-
al.
Those who can come, please notify
Mr. Koella, telephone 3923, not later
than tomorrow at noon.
Graduation Recital: Mr. Charles
Law, Violinist, student of Professor
Wassily Besekirsky, will give the fol-
lowing Graduation Recital, Thursday
evening, August 8, to which the gen-
eral public, with the exception of
small children is invited. Mr. Achilles
Taliaferro will be the accompanist:
Concerto in D major, Mozart-Jo-
achim.
Sonata, Franck.
Serenade, Delius.
Hora Staccato, Dinicu-Heifetz.
Romance, Gretchaninoff.
Danse Du Diable Vert, Cassado.
North Carolina winter resorts at
Pinehurst and Southern Pines report
this season was the busiest and long-
est of many years.

ENDS TONIGHT
"CARDINAL RICHELIEU"
plus
"MARY JANE'S PA"
Wednesday - Thursday
CLAUDETTE COLBERT
"PRIVATE WORLDS"
-- plus
EDWARD EVERETT HORTON
"$10 RAISE"
NOW
WARNER
A L I SON

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
cash in advance 11c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
ln(,) for one or two insertions.
1Oc per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
Telephone rate-15c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
4eper reading line for three or
more insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By contract, per line - 2 lines daily, one
month.................c
4 lines E.Of.. 2 months...........3c
2 lines daily, college year........7c
4 lines E.O.D., college year........7c
100 lines used as desired..........9c
300 lines used as desired..........8c
1,000 lines used as desired ........7o
2.000 lines used as desired........c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
6c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. 1x

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Antiques, glassware, fur-
niture, jewelry, doll furniture,*books,
many other miscellaneous items.
408 S. Seventh St. (Near W. Lib-
erty). Dial 7068.
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS -. $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
FOR SALE: Antique jewelry, brace-
lets, brooches, earrings, etc. Rea-
sonable. Phone 8050. 2020 Dev-
onshire Road. 5x
FOR RENT
UNUSUAL apartment: two rooms,
kitchenette, bath, suitable for two
or three graduate men. 540 Wal-
nut.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: A pair of silver-rimmed glasses
in a brown case. Call R. A. Choate
at 3506.
The Strange 'What-s-It?'
Puzzles fhawa.iian Fishers
HON0LUTLUT Aug S_-(UP) -A

I

,±4... U gSA5. M. t r/- *n
PERSONAL laundry service. We take strange fish has forced expert ichthy-
individual interest in the laundry ologists to admit their inability , to
problems of our customers. Girls' identify it, so data is being sent to
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar- the Academy of Natural Sciences in
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty. Philadelphia.
Call for and deliver Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3x The 44-pound "what-is-it" and a
TUDENT HnLndr.i r- 23-pound companion were caught off
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea~-thKoacsHwircely
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.the Kona coast, Hawa, recently.
4x Fishermen declared they have never
seen anything like it before.
WANTED_ The forward part was almost com-
WANTED: For iext school year, 2-5 pletely covered by blue-green lines.
room apartment. Kitchenette, first Scales had a curved line design. The

floor. Near Law Quadrangle. Write
Box 20, Mich. Daily.
ADVERTISING -- Copywriter, layout
man wishes part-time employment
with local stores starting in Fall.
Low monthly salary expected, ex-
cellent references. Will show
samples of work. Box 42.

Bail was green-blue with black stripes.
SOCIAL
DANCING
Toe, tap, acrobatics.
Taught daily. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695
C- 7I Open evenings.

THE MICHIGAN REPERTORY PLAYERS
AND THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC
present
THE FAMOUS LIGHT OPERA
"TH bCOCO'LATE'
SOLDI ER"1
MUSIC by OSCAR STRAUS
Chorus of 40 Voices
Orchestra of 24 pcs.
Hit Songs:
MY HERO
FALLING IN LOVE
SYMPATHY
TALE OF A COAT
SPECIAL MATINEE
Saturday 2:30
Lydia MENDELSSORN Theatre
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8:30
Prices 75c, 50c & 35c Phone 6300
It
AT THE CROSSROADS OF
A NATION IN THE MAKING
~ I~*I~AV~~5 -X I

SCREEN

Four stars - shouldn't miss; three stars -
very good; two stars - an average picture; one
star - poor; no star - don't go.
AT THE MICHIGAN
"THE FARMER TAKES A WIFE"
A Fox picture starring Janet Gaynor and Henry
Fonda, with Slim Sunmerville, Charles Bickford,
Andy Devine, Jane Withers, Margaret Hamilton,
and Roger Imhof. Also a Mickey Mouse in color,
"The Band Concert," Paul Tompkins, and a Para-
mount newsreel.
One of those romances between simple, earthy
people isn't bad enough to spoil this very interest-
ing story of life on the old Erie Canal -inter-
esting probably because there is no attempt to
make it another historical super-epic.
The romances is between a supposed clod (Henry
Fonda) and a pseudo-pugnacious young canal cook
(Janet Gaynor) who loves the "old Erie" with every
ounce of her Irish spunk. But he loves the
farm and so things reach an impasse until she de-
cides she can love the farm too, which happens
at the end of the picture.
The stars, Fonda and Miss Gaynor, are matched
in ability by every other member of the cast.
There's Slim Summerville, ne'er do well and
amateur dentist, who is fascinated by the ivory
in the mouth of a grinning horse. There's Andy
Devine, eternally condemned to shipping hogs on
his boat and smelling accordingly. And Char'les
Bickford, the bully of the canal, the best swag-
gering roughneck the screen has. Jane Withers,
leading her cow to the fair, is incomparable.
Janet Gaynor, as one who would say "Isn't it
wonderful. The season hasn't opened and there's
a fight already!," is too nice for her part. She
often has difficulty in managing the dialogue.
As a canal man whose strongest oath is "Jeep-
ers creepers," who looks at the ground and blushes
whenever he talks to his girl, who is, in short, a
hayseed, Henry Fonda will be appreciated by few.
Once or twice -as is so often the case in his-

By JOHN
"THEY SHOOT HORSES,

SELBY
DON'T THEY?"

by Horace McCoy; (Simon & Schuster).
i VERY READER to his choice, of course. Those
who like the so-called "hard-boiled novel"
have the somewhat derisory sympathy of those
who do not. These last feel that such perform-
ances as Horace McCoy's "They Shoot Horses,
Don't They?" rank with the literary efforts which
bloom on back fences. Perhaps...
Mr. McCoy is trying to show how a thoroughly
no-good girl enmeshes and drags down a rather
simple young man who just adores the celluloid
people. The girl knows she isn't worth dynamiting
- in fact, she tried suicide and even suicide didn't
take.
So she did the next best thing, which was to
enter a California dance marathon with her pre-
cious innocent as partner. They dance round and
round the place. They secure "sponsors" to buy
clothing in return for advertising legends there-
on. They make a hit with a moronic old woman.
They watch a chap carted away because he is a
murderer. They see a cheap wedding on the floor.
And much more that is not good clean fun by any
stretch of the imagination.
Then a shooting breaks up the marathon. So
far as the conversation and action of Mr. McCoy's

f7 '"VI rnarnu' w

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