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August 03, 1935 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1935-08-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1935

One Good Reason Why America's Doubles Team Lost

--Associated Press Photo.
This, of course, doesn't fully explain how the United States failed to win a single point in the Davis cup
challenge round against England - not even the old American "sure" point, the doubles - but to a tennis stu-
dent it's an almost perfect example of where not to be, and how, during a four-man passage at racquets.
If John Van Ryn (foreground) and Wilmer Allison had tried their best they couldn't have got themselves into
a more "untenable"-- as the experts put it - position. Three of their four feet are meeting at the exact con-
fluence of the center and service lines, leaving both sides of the court wide open and their feet exceedingly
vulnerable. Besides which they're bumping into each other. Tough luck!

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is con-
suct1 e notice to all members of
te Univ ersity. Copy received at the
office of the Summer Session, Room,
1213 A.H. until 3:30; 11:30 Saturday.
VOL. XVI No. 36
SATURDAY, JULY 3, 1935
Teacher's Certificate Candidates:
The comprehensive Examination in
Education will be given this morn-
ing at 9 o'clock in the University High
School auditorium.
C. O. Davis, Secretary
School of Education.
Baseball Game, West Park, today.
August 3, 2:00 p.m., between Sum-
mer School Students (Haken, Mgr.).
and Lewis and Frisinger's City Team.
Attention Summer Session Stu-
dents: The Summer Session prom
this evening will be summer formal
The men will dress as usual, if they
wish, and the women students will
come formal. The price of admis-
sion will remain the same, 25 cents
per person.
Jean Seeley.
Episcopal Student Group: The Fel-
lowship Hour for students will be
held Sunday evenings at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Piersol at 625
Oxford Road. Cars will leave the
church at seven o'clock. All Episco-
pal students and their friends are
cordially invited.
Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church:
Services of worship Sunday are: 8:00
a.m. Holy Communion; 11:00 a.m.
Children's Hour; 11:00 a.m. Holy
Communion and Sermon by the Rev-
erend Frederick W. Leech.
Members of Pi Lamba Theta So-
ciety will meet at 4 o'clock Sunday
afternoon at the University Element-
ary School to go to tea at the home
of Professor Cleo Murtland.
Summer SessionFrench Club: The1
last meeting of the Club will takeI
place Thursday, August 8. There
will be a banquet at 6:45 p.m. in the
"Second Floor Terrace Room" of the
Michigan Vnion. No charge for
members. Special program. Danc-i
ing. Informal.
Those who can come, please notifyi
Mr. Koella not later than Tuesday
evening, August 6. Telephone 3923.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information,
has received notice of the following,
U. S. Civil Service examinations:
Principal Horticulturist (Bulb and
Floricultural Investigations), $5,600.
Asst. Engineering Draftsman to
Principal Engineering Draftsman, $1,-
620 to $2,300.
Notices are on file in 201 Mason
Hall.
For the last 'two weeks of the Sum-
mer Session there will be no band
concerts or Tuesday evening pro-
grams by the Faculty of the School
of Music.
Candidates for the M. A. Degree in
English: An examination in the read-
ing knowledge of a modern language
will be given on Monday, August 5,
1935, at 7:15 p.m. in Room 2225 A. H.
Please leave your name and the
language in which you desire to be ex-
amined before noon of August 3rd in
the English Office, 3221 A. H.
Candidates for the Teacher's Cer-
tificate: A tentative list of candidates
to be recommended for the Teacher's
Certificate at the end of the Summer
Session has been posted on the bul-
letin board in Room 1431 University

Leader Of Militant Anti-Long
Battle Finds Time For Children

Shot Down In Holdup

NEW ORLEANS, La., Aug. 2. -- (')
-To raise a family of four children,
most mothers will agree, is quite a
task in itself. But a New Orleans
mother, Mrs. Hilda Phelps Ham-
mond, has done that and led a re-
lentless fight against Senator Huey
P. Long at the same time.
The militant chairman of the Wo-
men's Committee of Louisiana, an or-
ganization that for three years has
opposed Long's increasing power, has
found time for both her children and
the Long fight by careful planning.
"It hasn't been fun," the tall,
black-haired chairman says. "The
fight has taken a lot of my time from
my children and home, but they have
been generous and willing to make
sacrifices which they feel are for the
good of their state and country. And
they have became more self-reliant
and competent."
The Hammond children, Arthur,
Jr., 16; Blanche, 15; Lillian, 11; and
John, 7, all agree it hasn't been so
pleasant sharing their mother with
politics, but they are for her 100 per
cent in her fight against Long.
All four children are ardent news-
paper readers and follow their moth-
er's activities closely through the col-
umns of the local newspapers.
"I used to play chess with Arthur
frequently," she says, "but we seldom
find time for a game now. I think he
misses it as much as I do."
Busy as she is, Mrs. Hammond
manages to keep up with her chil-
dren's activities. In between meet-
ings and work at the Women's Com-
mittee headquarters, she finds time
to get Blanche ready for a vacation
trip to the Mississippi gulf coast, fig-
ure with Arthur on courses he will
take when he enters Tulane next fall,
help Lillian with her sewing and read
to John.
"It's a busy life, in fact too busy,"
Mrs. Hammond says, "and I'll be glad
when the fight is over," which, she

adds, will be "when we've licked Huey
Long and John Overton."
The Women's Committee now is en-
gaged in an effort to unseat ,Senators
Long and John Overton. The com-
mittee has filed a petition with the
senate seeking a new investigation of
their charges that Overton was elect-
ed "fraudulently."
Schultz Freed
Of Tax Evasion
ount By ury
MALONE, N. Y., Aug. 2. - (P) -
Freed by a country jury whichre-
ceived a bitter tongue-lashing from
the court for its vedict, Arthur
(Dutch Schultz) Flegenhemer was
determined today to discharge his in-
come tax obligation to the govern-
ment.
Shortly after a federal jury de-
cided last night that the former
Bronx beer buccaneer was innocent
of evading payment of $92,000 in-
come taxes, Schultz said through an
attorney:
"We intend to pay."
The debt amounts to slightly more
than $92,000, including interest and
penalties.
"I'm going back to New York. I'm
going back shortly," Schultz said.
He fled New York four years ago
shortly after the federal grand jury
returned a sealed indictment against
him. He surrendered at Albany last
November.
The beer baron's trial here was on
an indictment handed up by a federal
grand jury at Albany on Feb. 21 after
the government had decided to drop
removal proceedings. The southern
district indictment in New York car-
ried an additional count charging
conspiracy.

'Trivial' Operation
Performed On Eye
Of Tiger Manager
DETROIT, Aug. 2.-(P) - Mickey
Cochrane, manager and catcher for
the Detroit Tigers, underwent an
operation . for an eye infection in
Henry Ford hospital last night, it
was disclosed today.
Dr. E. L. Whitney who performed
the operation described it as "trivial."
The surgeon said the operation was
for the removal of a cyst inside the
lid of the eye. He said Cochrane
would have been able to play today.
Detroit's game with the Cleveland
Indians was, postponed because of
rain.
The infection in Cochrane's eye was
described as an "inside sty" which
caused poisons to collect and might
have caused harm if allowed to re-
main.
Dr. Whitney said, however, that
a brief rest "would not harm" the
Tiger catcher.
Cochrane spent the night at home,
but returned to the hospital today for
an examination.
CONFESSES KIDNAPING
LONDON, Ont., Aug. 2. - (W) - Mi-
chael McCardell, arrested recently at
Crown Point, Ind., pleaded guilty this
morning to charges of participating
in the kidnaping last August of John
S. Labatt, wealthy London brewer.
He was remanded until Aug. 16 for
Isentence.

--Associated Press Photo.
Gunshot wounds suffered when
he was slow in raising his hands
during a holdup of the Keeley In-
stitute at Dwight, Ill., proved fatal
to Dr. J. H. Oughton (above), pres-
ident. The gunmen obtained no
money.
Hamtramck Prices
Of Meat Reduced
DETROIT, Aug. 2. - (A')-In Ham-
tramck, where the housewives' meat
buying strike began last Saturday,
prices broke sharply today, and there
were indications the strike would end
there before night. t
Following the action of a large
chain store grocery company which
handles meat, cutting all prices 20
per cent except for pork, other retail
meat dealers began posting signs in
their windows, announcing price re-
ductions.
Hamtramck police said they were
informed by strike leaders that pick-
et lines would be withdrawn as soon
as all butchers have complied with
their demand for a 20 per cent cut.
Elementary School. Any student
whose name does not appear on this
list and who wishes to be so listed
should report this fact at once to
the Recorder of the School of Edu-
cation, Room 1437. U.E.S.
Blanks for the payment of the
certificate fee may be secured in the
office of the Recorder. This fee must
be paid by the end of the Summer
Session.
C. O. Davis, Secretary
School of Education.
~I. --

Predict Death
Of Utility Bill
In Conference
WASHINGTON, Aug. 2. - (P) -
Studying the effects of the second
defeat which the house adminis-
tered to the Roosevelt administration
on the utility holding company issue,
some legislators predicted today that
the utility bill may now die in con-
ference.
On the other hand, some saw a
possibility of a compromise to settle
the angry quarrel about compulsory
dissolution of holding companies
called "unnecessary."
A chasm wider than ever separates
the senate and house conferences on
the measure as the result of the house
action yesterday.
After a debate broken by shouts,
jgers and applause, that chamber
again voted down compulsory aboli-
tion, 210 to 155, and then proceeded
to aim another blow in the admin-
istration's direction.
By a vote of 183 to 172, it instructed
its conferees to insist, if they deem
it desirable, on the exclusion of all
outsiders from the conferences in-
tended to iron out differences in the
utility bill as passed some time ago
by senate and house.
Stars From Thirty
Nations To Games
GARMISCH - PARTENKIRCHEN,
Germany, Aug. 2.-VP) -All coun-
tries of the globe where winter sports
are practiced will be represented at
the Olympic winter games here next
February 6-16.
Participation is assured from 30
nations, a record number. Only 17
competed at Lake Placid, N. Y., n
1932. Japan is one of the latest to
join, with an ice hockey team, three
figure skaters, four speed skaters, and
a ski crew of 15.
Bavarians are looking for a rollick-
ing time, as the games coincide with
the carnival period from January 6
to February 26, when revels are on
the program every day.
Preparations for the "Olympic
Carnival," as it is called, are being
made on a colossal scale, with vast
processions, balls and receptions. The
railway between Munich and Gar-
misch-Partenkrchen will be called
upon to transport 50,000 fans in the
morning hours of February 16, the
day of the ski-jumping contests.
JEWELRY nd
WATCH REPAIRING
HALLER'S Jewelry
State at Liberty"I

I., _________

LAKEI~
FRONTAGE
FOR SALE.
For a limited time lots on Portage Lake
Shores and Woodland Beach subdivi-
sions at Portage Lake will be offered at
sacrifice prices. Located only 15 miles
north and west of Ann Arbor, these two

Ff

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