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July 30, 1935 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1935-07-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1

. ....... . ......

same

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Official Publication of the Summer Session

. - ,

TI

ul ised every morning except Monday during the
Unerity year and Summer Session by the Board in
Oontrol of Student Publications.
'Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
M MI ER
sbociated flliate rczsz
- 134 iatigeSt 935
,4013014 ICINSt
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
i t-otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
publshed herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
8ubscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mall,
1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
fces: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Rpresentatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
Weat 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ......... JOHN C. HEALEY
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR ..ROBERT S. RUWITCH
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Thomas E. Groehn, Thomas H.
Kleene, William Reed, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
ASSISTANT EDITORS: Robert Cummins, Joseph Mattes,
Elsie Pierce, Charlotte Rueger.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
E'USINESE MANAGER...... ....RUSSELL READ
ASBISTANT BUS. MGR..........BERNARD ROSENTHAL
Circulation Manager ....................Clinton B. Conger
USINESS ASSISTANTS: Qharles E. Brush, Frederick E.
Why Peg
TheD_1_
I T IS DIFFICULT to understand the
logic of Prof. Edwin W. Kemmerer,
Princeton University economist, who demands
that the United States peg the dollar at 59 cents.
He states that if this were done and that if the
kovernment practiced economy and balanced
its budget, the country would see a great revival
of confidence. The validity of this statement is to
be doubted, but Mr. Kemmerer's stand is not sur-
prising in view of the fact that he is the leader
of the school which has been bitterly opposed to
the policies of George F Warren of Cornell Uni-
versity, which have been followed by the present
administration.
It is interesting to note, in considering Mr. Kem-
6erer's statement, that the United States was the
last of the great industrial nations to reduce the
gold content of its currency. Before the reduc-
tion was made we showed no signs of getting out
of the throes of the depression; our foreign ex-
ports- were at a low ebb, and our high dollar in
terms of depreciated foreign currencies placed us
in an extremely disadvantageous position for inter-
national trade.
Upon reduction of the gold content of the dol-
lar to 59 cents we started on the up grade. Prices
rose; our domestic sales swelled; and our foreign
exports jumped. England, France and other in-
dustrial nations no longer had us at a disadvan-
tage. The stabilization fund created out of the
profit resulting from devaluation is patterned after
England's, and it has given the United States a
bargaining power equal to hers.
While all important industrial countries are in a
position to further devalue their currencies, it
would be economic suicide for one country alone
to freeze the value of its currency. For instance,
if the United States fixed the price of the dollar at
59 cents, England and the others could devalue
their currencies further and place the United
States in the same position she held in 1932.
At present every country is watching the other
closely. None dares nor desires to start a de-
flation war which would raise havoc with foreign
exchange rates and decrease the possibility of in-
ternational stabilization of currencies.
Secretary of the Treasury Morgenthau suc-
cinctly expressed the matter in a radio address
when he said that stabilization by the United
Etates alone "would put us right back where
we were in 1932, and offer a tempting invitation
for others not to follow, but again to take ad-
vantage of our disadvantage,"
Common sense would indicate that interna-
tional stabilization arrived at through international
agreement is needed. The hope that one nation
can lead the way with the others nobly following
suit is certainly Utopian. Until all leading coun-
tries feel inclined to cooperate, it would seem

wise to leave well enough alone.
T he SOAP Box
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked
to be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words and to accept or reject
letters upon the criteria of general editorial importance
and interest to the campus.
In Defense Of... What?
To the Editor:
I should like to suggest that the bon vivants
who communicate with the world through your
Soap Box remain sober (or perhaps become sober)
while leading the rest of us from our darkness;
1 assume that both the Drs. Amused, And Sorry
For You! and B.B.C. were intoxicated when they

care would present a much more imposing array
of names of beverages with just as much stupidity
as Amused; the names would still mean nothing.
The Latin which Dr. Amused threw into his letter
for good measure is, of course, also meaningless
n this argument. All in all the reflections of re-
fined sots (and I am inclined to guess that Amused
has not tasted all the drinks on the list anyway)
are fairly dull, and the superiority claimed by those
who have indulged in classical wines is claimed on
false grounds. May I also point out that the ex-
amples of great men who sometimes drink is un-
important; can Amused demonstrate that Beet-
hoven would not have written more of his fine
chamber music and less of his dull symphonic
rmusic without drink, or that an Einstein who
opposed beer would not have remained a mathe-
matical physicist instead of turning into second
rate newspaper copy? I don't claim that these
things would have happened, but it is evident
that none of the men named by Amused was quite
perfect; none of them would have been perfect
even if he had opposed alcoholic beverages.
Dr. B.B.C. offers no more convincing arguments
than his colleague. He evidently dreams too
much to have retained appreciation of good writ-
ing; I could name a much more interesting and
instructive set of periodicals to read than those
he mentions (and I should not have to mention
the Christian Advocate either). At any rate I
see no reason for the Directory, to be guided in its
advertising habits by any other publication.
In particular, now, I might defend Indignant's
stand. Life at Ann Arbor, especially during the
summer session, is intense and tiring. At the end
of the day's labors, or even before they should
have ended, the student is likely to want refresh-
ment, and the beer advertisement on the front
cover of the Directory may suggest alcoholic bev-
erages as effective sources of such refreshment.
And the only objection I can think of to this pro-
cedure is that they might drink too much and
write letters like that of Amused, etc., and that of
Dr. B.B.C. and this one.
--H.Q.S.
July 27

AROUND

TI-I TOWN.

0 s

11

I

In wandering about the town last night we
learned that the intensive ten-day search on the
part of the local police department for a stolen
car has come to an end . . . they were seeking a
Chevrolet coach that had been rented from a local
driv-ur-self on July 20 . . . by a butler by the
name of Hugh A. Canders . . . it seems that he
forgot to return it . . . and indicentally it's the
same car that three University of Michigan stu-
dents ran away in earlier in the spring and were
picked up in New York . . . no sooner was the car
returned than . .. bingo! . . . it's missing again . .
but this time it was found PARKED in front of
the Michigan Union, where it undoubtedly had
been standing since the day of the rental . . . we
wonder how the cop on the beat feels who passed
it every day and night . . . much less the cruising
squad car . . . that rolls around the street in the
wee hours . . we're willing to bet the Union Tower
that for many a night that was the only car parked
on State Street.
* * * *
A friend in need is a friend indeed . . . that old
adage has stood for centuries. .. but George Mac-
Dougall, 22, of Ann Arbor, has lost all faith in it ...
and here's the story . . . George, out of kindness
of heart and friendship, agreed to bring a friend
to local justice court, who had to answer for dis-
orderly charges.. . Justice Jay H. Payne fined the
friend $11.95 . . . during the course of the proceed-
ings the Justice inquired as to who brought the
man into court ... George came forward ... "You
drove him down?" inquired the Justice . . . upon
receiving an affirmative answer he asked for
George's driver's license .... George couldn't pro-
duce it . . . and so Justice Payne turned around
and leveled a fine against him as well ... and, now,
according to George, he's all "washed-up" on that
friendship business.
In your own wanderings around the town did you
ever wonder about the history of that old theater
on Main Street ... the one that is all boarded up
... a few doors south of the present Wuerth the-
ater . .. well so did we . . . and so ... we turned to
DeWitt C. Millen ... an old Michigan grad, who
seems to know all about it ... he tells us ... that
it was wrecked by students .. . it all started when
the manager of the theater, who was walking down
the aisle to the piano in the orchestra pit, tripped
over the leg of a student who was sprawled out in
his seat . . . the two had some hot words . .. the
manager ordered the boy out and to make it more
emphatic he had a big 'rube' of a night-watchman
throw him out . . . they threw him into the street
with a bad cut on his head . .. two students who
were passing helped him to his room and got the
story from him . . . and that story went around
campus like wild-fire ... an hour later 2,000 young
men were snake-dancing down the street in the
direction of the theater . . . upon their arrival hell
broke loose! . . . Seats were torn up . . . lights
smashed . . . a rope placed about the piano and
dragged out in the street ... the Ann Arbor police
force (all six of them) had their coats and helmets
removed . . . quiet wasn't restored until the fire
department began bringing their hoses into play
.. and townspeople were sworn into police duty
.. . and then everybody melted away ... and that,
in brief, is the story of Ann Arbor's boarded the-
ater.

i

:

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place dvertisem entswith Casifed
Adv ertising Depar tmen(t. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns elose at five
o xclock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance Ile per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line)1 for one or two insertions.
10Oc per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimun 3 lines per insertion.
Telephone rate -15c per reading line
for one or two insertons.
4c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
10omdiseount if paid withi ten days
rothedate of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
fly contract, per line - 2 lines 'aily, GLO
month.. 8e
4 lines E.O.D. 2 months..........
2 lines daily, college year ........
4 lines E.O.D., college year........7
100 lines used as desired ..........v
300 lines used as desired..........c
1,000 lines used as desired ........
2,000 lines used as desired.......
The above rates are per reaaing line.
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Tonic ;type, upper and lower case. Add
Bc per line to above rates for all capital
Letters. Add Beper line to above for
bold face, upper and lower cae. Add
Lc per line to above rates for bold fa'e
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1931 Ford de luxe road-
ster. Priced for quick sale. Inquire
R. Read, 610 Forest, Phone 2-1214
or 6539.
FOR SALE: Hartmann wardrobe
trunk. Brown; excellent condition;
reasonable. Call 2-2700. 45
FOR SALE: Antique jewelry, brace-
lets, brooches, earrings, etc. Rea-
sonable. Phone 8050. 2020 Dev-
onshire Road. 5x
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. Ix
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
4x
NOTICE
WANTED: Two passengers desire ride
to Washington, D.C. Share expense.
Phone 8026. 47
DRIVING to Buffalo, Aug. 4th. Would
like two passengers. Inquire 115
S. Thayer. 46
DRIVING TO LOUISVILLE, Ky., Aug.
3 or 4. Have room for two passen-
gers. Call N. H. Newhouse at 3497.
407 N. Ingalls.

A-MUSE-ING STORY
A. D. Muse, farmer living near
Floydada, Tex., reported he crawled
on his hands and knees beneath a
tractor to escape huge hailstones
while a high wind pushed the machine
along.
The territories of the United States,
Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, all
maintain land-grant colleges.

The Baltic seacoast of Poland is less
than 40 miles long.
SOCIAL
DANCING
Toe, tap, acrobatics
Taught daily. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695
' f open evenings.

MICHIGAN / of the
r MATINEES SUMMER
25c ;Balcony Evenings
35c Main Floor Evenings

SCREEN

Four stars --shouldn't miss; three stars -
very good; two stars - an average picture; one
star - poor; no star - don't go.
AT THE MICHIGAN
"LOVE ME FOREVER"
A Columbia picture starring Grace Moore, with
Leo Carillo, Robert Allen, Luis Alberni and Douglas
Dumbrille. Also a Popeye cartoon, Paramount Pic-
torial, Paul Tompkins, and a Paramount newsreel.
There is no breast so savage that it will not be
coothed by the singing of Grace Moore - rankled
though it may be by squalling babies, poor golf
scores, or excessive heat.
She sings everywhere and anytime - afternoons
at Lake Placid, mornings at the Silver Slipper cab-
aret, and finally evenings at the Metropolitan. No
story could be so bad that it couldn't get by with
Grace Moore along.
But the plot of "Love Me Forever" isn't so bad,
although it is basically the same as that of "One
Night of Love." Margaret Howard (Grace Moore) is
rising up the ladder of success with the help of
gambler Steve Carelli (Leo Carillo), a lover of fine
music and of Grace Moore. But she is also loved
by a handsome, younger man (Robert Allen),
which makes her decision difficult. By the time
she is on the stage of the Metropolitan the deci-
sion has been made, and the favored one is out in
front to enjoy and applaud her triumph.
Miss Moore is a laughing happy actress. Leo
Carillo was never better - in fact, never quite as
good. Douglas Dumbrille has just about clinched
movie villainy honors.
Short subjects - the Popeye cartoon is a great
story of a search for buried treasure; Paul Tomp-
kins is very good; the Paramount Pictorial is in-
teresting; also a newsreel. -R.A.C.
BOOKS
By JOHN SELBY
"HIDDEN SHOALS,' by Sara Ware Bassett
Doubleday, Doran); "STORM SIGNALS," by
Joseph C. Lincoln, and "THE HOUSE OF
DAWN," by C. E. Scoggins (both Appleton-Cen-
tury); "ARCTIC S.O.S.," by Joseph M. Velter
(Harpers).
PERHAPS you are about to start on your vaca-
tion. Perhaps you would like to take along a
book which will fill unoccupied chinks of time
without making too heavy demands on your intel-
lect. There are two more or less bucolic in tone
which might help.
There is Sara Ware Bassett's "Hidden Shoals"
if you like to listen in on village gossip. The
scene is Belleport on Cape Cod, the plot has
to do with the regeneration of Joel (who seems
to be hanging about a certain woman too much)
and the romance of\ Joel's daughter. It begins
at a meeting of the Belleport Women's Literary
club, which is trying to choose an emblem for
itself.
Cape Cod is also (and of course) the scene of
Joseph C. Lincoln's latest which he calls "Storm
Signals." But this time Mr. Lincoln has gone
back to Civil War times to tell the story of Capt.
Ben Snow, who returns to Bayport suspected of
cowardice or worse after a shipwreck farther
down the coast. Nobody tangles and disentangles
the threads of Cape Cod life more expertly than
Mr. Lincoln.
Perhaps adventure will do better, Joseph M.
Velter is better known in Germany and Great
Britain than here for his Jack Londonish ad-
venture yarns -- "Arctic S.O.S." is the one chosen
to introduce him to America. It is a curious and
sometimes terrible story of three men marooned
in an isolated wireless station in Siberia, their2

Lydia MENDELSSOH'N Theatre
OP ENING WEDNESDAY
DOUBLE BILL 0
SirJames M. Barrie's ' Moliere's Satire
on the
Mste ry Sa tire o h
Medical Profession
"Shll e The octor
Join Thei In .Spie
Ladties?" T Htiself"
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday
Admission 75c, 50c, 35c Phone 6300
Next Week: "TH E CHOCOLATE SOLD I ER"

IT

lI

a

A Washington.
BYSTANDER

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON - Whatever may have moved
President Roosevelt to time his tax message as
he did, there is very definite proof that he long
ago made special preparations for taking up
that subject either at this or the next session. If
he had not, Representative Samuel B. Hill of
Washington might now be Senator Hill, enjoying a
freshman's relaxation in that body after seven
terms of highly specialized tax duty in the House.
When former Senator Dill of Washington decid-
ed not to run again in '34, almost every one thought
Hill would succeed him. Hill's record in having
captured a normally Republican district by about
300 votes in '23 and having steadily increased his
margin of victory each succeeding election, made
him the logical man. He even achieved an un-
opposed election to the last Congress and his ma-
jority in '34 was more than 40,000 votes.
WHY HILL ISN'T SENATOR
r[HAT TALE of rising majorities, even in years
of sweeping Republican national victories, is
almost all Hill tells about himself in his official
biography, except this: He is ranking member
of the ways and means committee and on the
joint committee on internal taxation. That means
he has been a Democratic specialist on taxes from
the time he entered Congress. And strange as
it may seem, that is why he is not Senator Hill
today.
Hill was poised to toss his hat into the senatorial
ring out in Washington in '34. He was on the
verge of going out to file his papers when some-
thing intervened to make him stay with his tax
problems in the House. About the only thing that
reasonably could be supposed to have influenced
him was a clear White House intimation that he
could not be spared by the administration from
this House because it was destined to take up the
toughest tax job Congress ever had.
* * * *
U.S. STAND ON ETHIOPIA
UNCLE SAM'S hasty refusal to get involved via
the Kellogg-Briand peace pact in the Italo-
Ethiopian war threat preliminaries does not alter

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Sigma Phi fraternity pin. Re-
turn 749 E. Univ. Ph 4049. Reward.
46
WHY NOT S.S. BANANA?
The S.S. Savannah, once yacht of
nobility and fighting vessel of the
United States during the World War
is now hauling banana cargoes to
Atlantic ports.
NOT COLONELS THIS TIME
The University of Kentucky has
granted 8.837 degrees since its or-
ganization.

12

rrNAW I

Ends Tonight
JAMES CAGNEY
"G-ME N"
plus --
"ANight At The Ritz"
Wed. - Thurs.
"It's A Small World"
plus
"ONE HOUR LATE"
MAJEST IC
25c TODAY UNTIL 2 P.M.
35c After 2
LAST TIMES TODAY
SHE SINGS!
SHE DANCES!.
SHE BRIGHTENS EVERY
HEART WITH HER
LAUGHTER! '
Her Happiest
Picture -

FRONTAG-E
For a limited time lots on Portage Lake
Shores and Woodlawn Beach subdiv-
sions at Portage Lake will be offered at
sacrifice prices. Located only 15 miles
north and west of Ann Arbor, these two
subdivisions offer convenience an
economy in summer residence.
Well graded, well wooded, and provided
with fine sand beaches on an excellent

lake.

Prices range from $450.00.

For addi-

hir ev

-T-- M y 7

t

tional information write or call R. Read,
610 Forest. Phone 2-1214 or 6539.

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