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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 28, 1935 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-07-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY__

Employes Are,
Requested To
Decline Gif t s
Senate Lobby Committee
Investigates Finances Of
Rep. Patton
Officials Are Warned
Seek To Untangle Mystery
Of Newspaper-Wrapped
Package

Once Again Executive Mansion Will Be Modernized

WASHINGTON, July 27.-()-The
communications commission today
warned all employes participating in
its investigation of the American
Telephone & Telegraph Co. not to
accept any favor or gifts from com-
pany officials or employes.
This action was taken while the
senate lobby committee investigated
informally the private finances of
Representative Patton (Dem. Texas)
at the congressman's invitation. The
inquiry resulted from testimony that
out of his first $3,100 of government
salary he invested $3,000 in United
States bonds.
The committee also sought to un-
tangle a conflicting story about a
mysterious newspaper-wrapped pack-
age.'
One witness said he had seen Pat-
ton carry such a box from the hotel
room of John W. Carpenter, Texas
Power Company president, the day
beforie the congressman voted against
a utility bill provision calling for
compulsory dissolution of certain
holding companies.
In a general order to all persons
employed on the telephone inquiry,
Chairman Walker of the communi-
cations commission's telephone divi-
sion declared "it is of the utmost im-
portance that persons engaged in the
telephone investigation, including
that of the manufacturing and other
subsidiary companies, so conduct
themselves at all times as to avoid
suspicion of impropriety, lack of dili-
gence or improper attitude toward the
work in which they are engaged."
The order continued:
"To this end, all persons engaged
in the telephone investigation must
be cautioned against conduct which
may be prejudicial to the investiga-
tion.
"The acceptance of favors or gifts
from company officials or employes
must be strictly prohibited. Luncheon,
theater, golf or club engagements, or
introductions to clubs or places of
amusement, extended as favors from
company sources, should be cour-
teously declined.
"Financial relations with the com-
pany, its officials or employes, includ-
ing loans of money, cashing of checks,
etc., must likewise be strictly pro-
hibited."
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 3)
25 cents will be charged at the Vil-
lage. Reservation must be made in
the office of the Summer Session by'
5 p.m. Tuesday. Cost of bus fare,
$1.00 round trip.
Graduation Recital: Carl Fredrick-
son, Baritone, student of Professor
Arthur Hackett, will give the follow-
ing Graduation Recital, Monday eve-
ning, July 29, at 8:30 o'clock in the
School of Music Auditorium, to which.
the general public, with the exception
of small children is invited. Mr. Ger-
ald Greeley, will be the accompanist.
Evening Hymn, Purcell.
Come Again, Dowland.
Verdi Prati, Handel.
"Revenge, Timotheus Cries" Alex-
ander's Feast, Handel.
Le Charme, Chausson.
L'Intruse, Fevrier.
L'Angelus, Bourgault-Ducoudray.
Mandoline, Debussy.
Ein Ton, Cornelius.
Wohin, Schubert.
Die Stadt, Trunk.
Zueignung, Strauss.
My Lady Walks in Loveliness,
Charles.
O Mistress Mine, Quilter.
Siesta, Besly.
When I Think Upon the Maidens,
Head.
Discussion Group Meeting: All per-
sons engaged or interested in the ed-
ucation of Negroes are invited to a
discussion group meeting to be held in
the Michigan Union Room 302 Mon-

day evening, July 28, 7:15 o'clock.
The topic for discussion is "Coopera-
tion between the Negro professional
group and Negro workers."
Emma Mary Foote, Organist, stu-
dent of Palmer Christian, will give
the following Graduation Recital,
Monday afternoon, July 29, at 4:15
o'clock in Hill Auditorium, to which
the general public, with the exception
of small children is invited:
Piece Heroique, Franck.
Cantabile, Franck.
Toccata, Adagio, Fugue in C, Bach.
Prelude Op. 11, Schmitt.
The Mirrored Moon, Op. 96, No. 6,
Kark-Elert.
Toccata, Op. 59, No. 5, Reger.
Symphonie VI, Widor.

-Associated Press Photo.
As far as housekeeping facilities go, the Whiter House has been decried for more than a century by its
mistresses. Abigail Adams, left, who moved in in 1797, complained she had to hang her washing in the
East Room. Eleanor Roosevelt, right, admitted that the rats frightened her guests. But now the whole kitchen
is to be remodeled, an lcoctric dishwasher is to go in and old patchwork fixtures to be changed. The sketch
of the White House below shows that 118-year-old mansion as it looked in 1925. The picture above shows the
building as it is today, with the executive offices at the extreme left where Andy Jackson's cow barn used to
stand. -- (Picture of Mrs. Adams from White('s Biographies.)
New Deal' For White House Kitchens
May End All Housekeeping Diffculties
Yy

Women Buyers,
Riot In Effort
To Lower Rates
Numerous Customers Are
Beaten And Scratched
By Picketers
DETROIT, July 27. - (P) - Nu-
merous meat shop customers were
beaten or scratched and their pack-
ages thrown in the gutters today by
Amazons among the several hundred
housewives picketing markets in an
effort to force a 20 per cent reduction
in meat prices.
The victims were principally hus-
bands who said ruefully they had
been goaded into doing the family
meat shopping by wives who demand-
ed to know if they "were afraid of
a few women.-
A dozen or more meat markets
closed an hour after the demonstra-
tion appeared. Some of them car-
ried placards reading "strike on meat
buying."
The picketing occurred in Ham-
tramck, Polish section of the metro-
politan area.
"We don't mind being badgered,"
said one merchant, "but there is no
use selling meat when our customers
get it taken away from them as soon
as they walk out the door."
Hamtramck police did not interfere
when the picketers began snatching
customers' parcels.
The customers complained of the
treatment they received.
"I wouldn't let Joe Louis muss me
up the way those women did," said
one man, "but what can you do to a
woman when she starts in on you?"
Miss Mary Zuk, head of the cam-
paign which was organized by the
women's action. committee, said, "We
haven't dusted off our rolling pins -
yet."
"But if we don't get what we want,"
she added, "watch out!"
The picketing was decided upon,
Miss Zuk said, after meat packers
and .merchants with whom the com-
mittee conferred had declared they
were unable to'reduce prices.
Mother Issues License
For Daughter's Wedding
REDWOOD CITY, Calif., July 27.
(1) - It's the father traditionally
who "gives away" his daughter in
marriage. But Mrs. Laura Collins is-
sued her daughter a marriage license.
Mrs. Collins, a deputy in the San
Mateo county clerk's office, officiated
when her daughter, Virginia, 24, ob-
tained the license to wed David -T.
Reddie, 30, automobile salesman.

Man Asks Law For
Help, But Is Fined
And Sent To Cooler
The Golden Rule seems to have
risen up and slapped W. F. Lumus.
,nanager of the Baltimore Dairy
munch on South State. Lumus tried
o invoke the law against two of hit
helpers, and as a result spent most
of Saturday in the Washtenaw Coun-
;y Jail.
Two recalcitrant employes, it seems,
just refused to be fired. Lumus grew
worried. ,had some beer to cool his
excitement. Then a solution ap-
peared to him, and he hurried down
to the court house to tell his story
to Justice Jay H. Payne, get a court
order against the helpers.
The judge heard his story, sniffed
ympathetically. Just then Police
Sergeant Norman Cook strolled in,
following a call to the police station
by the about-to-be-fired helpers.
Cook sniffed, not sympathetically, but
suspiciously. Payne caught on, snif-
fed once more himself, slapped a
drunk and disorderly charge on Lum-
us.
"Who brought him down here?"
Payne asked. A friend of Lumus,
George Macdougall, 22, of R.F.D. 4,
answered, and another question
showed him to be without a driver's
license.
For a starter, Payne fined Mac-
dougall $5.00. Warming to his work,
Payne assessed Lumus $5.00, and
costs of $6.95, ordered him to jail
until 3 a. m. to "sober up." The two
helpers, it seems, still have their jobs.
Abandon Samovars
MOSCOW - .) -Muscovites have
taken to preparing their tea in ordi-
nary kettles and the samovar is fall-
ing into disuse. Thirteen thousand
samovars were sold to government
commission shops here in the lastj
year.

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
FOR RENT
FOUR ROOM furnished apartment
one Aug. 1, one Sept 15, Kelvinators,
laundry. 209 N. Ingalls St. Phone
3404.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Hartmann wardrobe
trunk. Brown; excellent condition;
reasonable. Call 2-2700. 45
FOR SALE: Antique jewelry, brace-
lets, brooches, earrings, etc. Rea-
sonable. Phone 8050. 2020 Dev-
onshire Road. 5x
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCEE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. ix
PERSONAL laundry service. We tak4'
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver Phone 5504.
611 E. Hoover. 3x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices re-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
4x
NOTICE
DRIVING TO LOUISVILLE, Ky., Aug.
4 or 5. Have room for two passen-
gers. Call N. H. Newhouse at 3497.
407 N. Ingalls.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Sigma Phi fraternity pin. Re-
turn 749 E. Univ. Ph 4049. Reward.
46

WASHINGTON, July 27. -(AW) -
It's going to take a complete re-
wiring and electric overhauling of
the whole White House to do it, but
the presidential family is going to get
an electric dishwasher at last!
Of course, when the sudsy water
will start swishing over that beau-
tiful New Roosevelt China all de-
pends upon when Congress adjourns.
The kitchen remodellers can't start
work until they can shut off the light
and water. They can't do that until
the President leaves. He can't leave
until the law-mill on Capitol Hill
quits grinding.
Meanwhile, the exterior excavation
around the front portico and ground-
floor-level building for new storage
rooms, carpenter shop, and servants'
locker rooms, continues -unearth-
ing and preserving such quaint and
delightful treasures as the remains of
"Andy Jackson's cow barn" complete
with troughs and stalls.
Jackson's Alterations
It was Andy who added the North
portico - turning what was meant
for the back door into the front -to
the great convenience of future gen-
erations of official callers, but caus-
ing no end of future inconvenience in
the kitchens.
Never did the ancient mansionI
know the luxury of an electric wash-
ing machine, nor, for that matter,
even an electric iron. Clear down
through the Coolidge administration
the clothes were washed by hand, the
ironing was done by old-fashioned
flat-irons - and every day was wash
day.
But, Mrs. Ava Long, Hoover house-
keeper, took one look at this labor-
ious old system - and sent the laun-
dry out.
The chances are strong it won't
Costume Director of the Michigan
Repertory Players, will speak on "The
Modern Theater Movement." All
women students who are interested
in Education are invited to attend.
I _ -

come back, for Presiaent Roosevelt's
office now stands on the site of the
old clothes-drying yard, and the
laundry itself gave way to no less
than. the cabinet room in last sum-
mer's executive office remodeling.
This summer's job, placarded,
"Public Works Project No 634," and
using labor from the local relief rolls,
on a low bid of $152,981, means chief-
ly a change-over from direct to al-
ternating current; throughout the
White House, and an over-hauling of
old, patch-work fixtures, condemned
as fire-hazards by federal engineers.
"It was decided while doing it to
include other changes, making kit-
chens modern, dust-proof and insect-
proof which is important in a 118-
year-old house," said Capt. E. P.
Locke, army engineer in charge of
the White House.
Housekeeping Drawbacks
From Abigail Adams, who bitterly
complained she had to hang her
washing in the East Room and had
no bells with which to summon ser-
vants, on down to Mrs. Franklin D.
Roosevelt, who revealed her guests
were frightened by rats, White House
mistresses have known that life there,
although glamorous, had housekeep-
ing drawbacks.
Two remarkable over-lapping, first-
person, eye-witness narratives, "Thir-
ty-six Years in the White House," by
Thomas F. Pendel, doorman from
Lincoln to Theodore Roosevelt, and
"Forty-two Years in the White
House," by Ike Hoover, usher from
Harrison to Franklin D. Roosevelt,
give plenty of male backing to fem-
inine complaints.
Pendel related how President Ar-
thur came in, looked around, burst
out: "I will not live in a house that
looks like this!" - and didn't either,
until the first two bathrooms had
made their appearance. Pendel told,
too, how a bold rat killed Mrs. Cleve-
land's pet canary, which she loved so
much she had it stuffed.
Ike Hoover described how he first

entered the White House as electri-
cians were installing the very first
lights in the Harrison overhaul of
1891.
"Five layers of flooring were un-
covered, like geological strata. The
bricks were slimy with damp. All
was soot, dust and cobwebs. The
kitchen had been moved when the
house was turned around, and the or-
iginal kitchen now was a furnace
room and mechanics shop.
"The old cranes and spits were
still in place in. the sooty fireplaces
where slaves had boiled the chick-
ens and cooked the hoecakes of the
early presidents."
Where To Go
2 p.m. Majestic Theater, Shirley
Temple in "Curly Top."
2 p.m. Michigan Theater, "Love Me
Forever" with Grace Moore.
2 p.m. Wuerth Theater, James Cag-
ney in "G-Men" and Patricia Ellis in
"A Night at the Ritz."
7 p.m. Same features at the three
theaters.
Canoeing every afternoon and eve-
ning on the Huron River, Saunder's
Canoe Livery.
Dancing at the Blue Lantern Ball-
room, Island Lake featuring Clare
Wilson and his orchestra.

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Pretzel Dell Tavern
Special Features
SPLENDID DAILY LUNCHEONS 25c
FINEST BROILED T-BONE STEAK
PLANKED WHITEFISH DINNERS
PERFECT DRAUGHT BEER
FINEST OF FOODS --- Everyone Enjoys the Pretzel Bell
CLEAN OPEN
COMFORTABLE SUNDAY AND
COOL HOLIDAYS

11

A

i4

All Types of
DANCING
Taught daily. Private
less~ons only. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695

SWIM PICNIC
N EWPORT
BATHING BEACH
PORTAGE LAKE
Constantly Changing Wa'ter

LAKE

BIG

FRONTAGE
FOR SALE

as

--in the leg
--in the seat
--at the waist

For a limited time lots on Portage Lake
Shores and Woodlawn Beach subdivi-
sions at Portage Lake will be offered at
sacrifice prices. Located only 15 miles
north and west of Ann Arbor, these two

as when they come to us.

subdivisions

offer convenience

and

economy in summer residence.

FLANNELS
guaranteed Against
SHRINKAGE

Well graded, well wooded, and provided
with fine sand .beaches on an excellent

lake.

Prices range from $450.00.

For addi-

~~IJrn~

tional information write or call R. Read,
610 Forest, Phone 2-1214 or 6539.

11

UTosted Wafehrs vlii 1111

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