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July 21, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1936-07-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

lJESDAY, JULY 21, 1934

L-- MICHIGAN DAILY

TilE MICHIGAN DAILY

- .- --- -- t -- --mmmmummommm

I

NEWS
Of The
DAY

(From The Associated Press)
Japan Angry Over
Chino-U.S. Agreement
TOKYO, July 21.-(Tuesday)
-(A)-Reports of an agreement
for a large American credit to
China to purchase airplanes, au-
tomobiles and railway rolling
stock were contained in dis-
patches from Shanghai printed in
vernacular newspapers today.
A majority of the papers treat-
ed the reported plan as a menace
to Japan's interests in China.
The Nichi Nichi's correspon-
dent asserted that Arthur Camp-
bell, a United States financial
representative, and T. V. Soong,
president of the Bank of China,
signed the agreement at the
United States." consulate at
Shanghai July 15.
"Since the credit was virtually
used to bolster China's national
defense, Japan cannot overlook
it," the newspaper said.
Pilots Will Begin
Tour Of Michigan
MACKINAC ISLAND, July 20.
-(A)-Forty members of the
Sportsman Pilots' Association
were here tonight for a two-day
meeting that serves as an inter-
lude in their leisurely air tour of
Michigan.
The airmen, traveling in 17
planes, left their ships at St.
Ignace. Heading tfhe tour is
Chester H. Warrington, national
president of the association. The
flight will end at Detroit next
Monday.

Madrid March
Is Predicted In
Spanish Revolt
Barcelona Bombing Kills
200; Government Claims
It Has 'Upper Hand'
(Continued from Page 1)
Montana barracks in Madrid revolt-
ed but quickly submitted.
"The situation in general has im-
proved today.
"The Spanish government is send-
ing news by radio in Spanish, English,
French and German every hour from
6:30 to 9:30 p.m. (EST)."
CEUTA, Spanish Morocco, July 20.
-(OP)-Gen. Francisco Franco, leader
of the Spanish military rebellion, told
the Reuters (British) news agency
correspondent here tonight his aim
was to save western Europe "from
the menace of Russian Communism."
By ELMER W. PETERSON
(Copyright, 1936, by the Associated Press)
BIARRITZ, France, July 20. - (IP)
-A battle between Spanish rebels ad-
vancing from Pamplona and workers
armed by the government appeared
-probable tonight at the important
northern city of San Sebastian. I
As this correspondent left San
Sebastian with more than 300 for-
eigners, including some other Amer-
icans, all roads into San Sebastian
were barricaded with sandbags and
metal oil-drums. There were reports
the insurgents had blown up several
important bridges as they moved on
the city.
Gangs of workers raced through the
streets of San Sebastian in comman-
deered autos, with shotguns and re-1
volvers pointed menacingly out of the1
windows. Sounds of constant sniping
were heard almost everywhere in the
city.
No estimate of the number of dead
or wounded in the region were avail-
able in San Sebastian, although it
was generally considered high.
Before the bus caravan left San
Sebastian, the tourists heard the gov-
ernor of the Guipuzcoa department,k
in a radio broadcast, appeal to leftistf
workers to help defend the city fromf
the approaching rebel forces.
Peasants and children along thek
road over which we traveled to the
frontier shook clenched fists in ap-
proval at the red flags flying on the
radiator caps of the busses.z
Frequent stops were made to re-f
move the makeshift barricades from
the roads. Communist workers who
built them helped clear a passage for
the busses.
Major Leagues

Nine Persons Lose Lives In Crossing T ragedy At Dundee

Directory Lists
Nearby Places
Of Recreation
Wasatenaw County Map
AbLo Available As Guide
For Summer Students
For the benefit of those summer
students who have not yet discovered
where to go and what to do in the
line of summer recreation, a map
of Washtenaw County and directory
of places of interest is obtainable, free
of charge, at the League or Union
desks or at the business office of the
University, it was announced yester-
day.
The map and directory lists every
kind of recreation possible in these
parts. For those who like to spend
their leisure time on or near the
water. there are suggested places for
canoe trips, picnicking, boating, and
fishing and bathing.
On ,cooler days when hiking is en-
joyable, .seven different hikes in the
vicinity of Ann Arbor can be taken.
Twenty golf courses are also listed,
the first six being in the immediate
vicinity of Ann Arbor.
Those who are fortunate in having
cars may make use of the eleven in-
teresting drives from Ann Arbor to
suggested places such as the Huron
River Drive, along which can be seen
the old dams and mills of the early
settlers of Michigan. The Map and
Directory also lists 58 scenic and
historic places in Washtenaw County,
including lakes and camps and pro-
jects such as the Ford Cooperative
Farms and the Waterloo Project.
INVESTIGATE FIRE SERIES
CARO, July 20. - (P)-Sheriff
George J. Jeffrey began today an
investigation of fires which destroyed
farm buildings and livestock on three
farms within a six-mile radius within
three nights. One of the blazes was
at the farm of Prosecutor Bates Wills.

-Associated Press Photo.
Nine persons, members of two Pennsylvania families, lost their lives in this automobile, shown after it
was struck by an Ann Arbor railroad train on a crossing near Dundee, Mich. The wreckage was strewn
along the right-of-way by the train and the bodies of the victims were hurled into the nearby Raisin River.

Parker And Brackett Plan Tour
Of Resorts To Continue Painting

Former Michigan
Commits Suicide

Woman

CHICAGO, July 20.-(AP)-Mrs.
Edith Kinsey, 37, formerly of
Grand Rapids, was taken to
Lakeview Hospital today after,
the police said, she swallowed
poison in a taxicab in front of her
home.
An unaddressed, pencilled let-
ter found in her apartment, po-
lice said, told of her intention to
"die other than God planned."
It cited financial difficulties.
Jack Terman, who told au-
thorities he was a friend of the
family, said the woman was the
former wife of Elmer Kinsey, a
Grand Rapids real estate man.
He said they were divorced four
years ago.
Near the letter was a list of
stock investments, with this quo-
tation:
"This list of $133,000 is now
worth just $3,250. It's all I
have to offer."
Dr. Blakeman's Son
Drowns Near Here
(Continued from Page l)
the spot where his body was recovered
is about 30 feet deep.
The boys had gone out to a cot-
tage owned by William Stevens, 17
years old, who had built the diving
bell. Sheriff's officers were unable
to notify Dr. Blakeman until last
night, as he had left the city after
visits to Patterson Lake and the Boy
Scout camp at Dexter. The Blake-
man home is at 5 E. Harvard Place.
Upon being notified of the tragedy
last night, Dr. Blakeman said he was
unable to believe that it had hap-
pened as reported. "My son has been
attending summer camps ever since
he was a little boy, and learned to
swim when he was four years old.
He, Baldwin, and Stevens, were all
members of the Ann Arbor High
School swimming team," he told The
Daily last night, ."and he was cap-
tain of it.
"Furthermore, the beach out there
is being carelessly run. I can't be-
lieve that it happened as you say it
did. I've talked to the doctor, and
a good swimmer, and it can't be
right."
He said that he had gone to a
park in Plymouth with friends from
Baltimore during the afternoon, and
had returned at about 6 p.m., but
had not gone to his home. He left no I
word when he went away because
there was nobody at home.

Play Production Director
And University Graduate
Paint For Own Tastes
The artistic scheme of Oren Parker,
art director for Play Production dur-
ing the winter season, and Donald
Brackett, a recent graduate of the
University Art School, is doing very
nicely according to the two sun-
burned painters who just returned
from Charlevoix, Mich., where they
found ample material to keep them
busily sketching for a solid week.
They plan to make a tour of re-
sort sections, there to do oils and
water colors of their surroundings,
and then set up exhibitions in the
hope of selling enough paintings to
finance them to California.
"We discovered right away that it
doesn't pay to paint with the idea
of the public in mind at all," Mr.
Parker said. "Now we paint an ar-
tistic setting if we ourselves think it
is sufficiently artistic. We're getting
grand training this way. We're learn-
ing to paint and also giving the public
better painting to boot," he con-
tinued.
The partnership of the two artists

FARM HAND PLEADS GUILTY
COLDWATER, July 20. - ( ) -
Stanley Marsh, a farm hand, pleaded
guilty Monday to slaying Jacob
Bishop, 72-year-old farmer, a week
ago and was sentenced to a life term
in the branch State Prison at Mar-
quette. State Police Lieut. Van A.
Loomis said Marsh confessed killing
Bishop to rob him.
READ THE WANT ADS

New Yo
Clevela
Boston
Detroit
Chicag(
Washin
Philade
St. Lou

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W. L.
ork ............58 30
nd ...........49 39
.48 41
.. . . .. . . 46 40
o...............46 40
gton ........ .45 41
?lphia .........28 57
is ....... . . ....27 58

Pct.
659
557
539
535
535
523
329
318

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled.
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Detroit
Boston at Cleveland.
New York at St. Louis.
Washington at Chicago.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

pionship bracket and which will play
in the first flight.
Threengames will be played this
week in the intramural softball
league. The schedule is as follows:
Tuesday, Tigers vs. Braves, Cubs vs.
Reds, Bees vs. Giants, Yanks vs.
Cards, and Indian vs. Dodgers. Wed-
nesday, Tigers vs. Indians, Dodgers
vs. Reds, Cubs vs. Braves, Bees vs.
Cards, and Yanks vs. Giants; Thurs-
day, Cubs vs. Indians, Giants vs. Dod-
gers, Tigers vs. Cards, Bees vs. Reds,
and Yanks vs. Braves.
The men's doubles tennis pairings'
are as follows: Finley-Olson vs. Neil-
son-Gardner, Briggs-Wright vs. Kas-
alopoff-Coleman, Panzarella-Lau vs.
Coulter-Reider, Thomson-Aroian vs.
Zimmerman-Anderson, Taylor-Grein
vs. Bell-Miles, and Routh-White vs.
Jones-Graban.
The standing in the softball

is quite unique in that this type of
easel-travelling has only been at-
tempted before by groups or schools.
Single artists don't care to move
around as much since it is difficult to
arrange exhibitions and get acquaint-
ed in the various communities.
"We painted steadily for a week in
Charlevoix without getting acquaint-
ed with anyone at all," Mr. Parker
went on. "So we finally decided to
go to the Artisan Guild Theatre,
which is a branch of the Detroit
group, and there, happily enough, we.
found theatre people we both knew.
Mr. Hudwick, director of the group,
helped us to arrange an exhibition
at the Belvidere Hotel there, the
largest in Charlevoix, and he's also
giving us a spot on the program and
an exhibition in their lobby."
Recalls Experience
Mr. Parker smiled as he recalled
the numerous interesting experiences
that they have had during their
Northern tour. "One day a mischiev-
ous-looking little urchin came along
while I was painting on the dock," he
said. "I expected him .to pull a trick
like pushing me in the water but he
just stood there and looked at the
painting rather quietly for awhile,
when suddenly he asked me, 'Hey,
mister, you didn't paint like that
when you were little like I am,did
you?' "
Some of the work of the two cam-
pus-artists has been on exhibition in
the lobby of the Women's League.
Their painting features something of
the color of the impressionists which
is painting simply with the pure,
primary colors of red, yellow and
blue, such as Paul Honore, the cele-
brated mural-painter of Royal Oak,
under whom they are both studying
at the present time, utilizes.
Estes Park Next Stop
The pair will return to Charlevoix
to set up their exhibition and try to'
earn as much as possible before they
undertake their next jump which is
to Estes Park, Colorado. Both of
them do oils and water colors and
Mr. Brackett also does wood-blocks.
Their versatility makes it possible to
satisfy any kind of order that they
might get. They plan to make notes'
all the way to the coast and spend
their time in California, which will
include some observation in Holly-
wood, in studying the rural scenery
and the beauty for which California
is noted.
"We plan to have a full exhibition
at Hudson's in Detroit in the fall,"
Parker said, "which will include all
of our paintings and notes."

SHIRTS
$1.15 ea., 3 for $2.95
Values to $3.50
POLO SH IRTS
79c ea., 3 for $2.35
$1.00 and $2.50 :Values
HOSIERY
Fine Quality Imported Wool
Summer Weight
20% Discount

WH ITE LINEN SUITS
Now $13.95 upward
Values from $18.50
Small Charge for Alterations

t-

Quantities are limited - All from our

VAN BOVEN'S
Annual Summer
CLEARANCE SALE
ALL MERCHANDISE IS SEASONABLE

GABARDINE SUITS
20% / Discount

W.
Chicago .............53
St. Louis .............53
Pittsburgh ...........44
New York ............45
Boston ..............41
Philadelphia .........33
Brooklyn ............30

L.
31
33
41
41
46
52
55

Pet.
631
616
518
506
471
388
353

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled.
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at New York.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia.
Chicago at Brooklyn.
Cincinnati at Boston.
Tennis, Golf, Figure
On Intramural Card
The intramural program for this
week was announced today by Ernie
Smith, who is in charge of the ac-
tivities.
The second round of the men's
singles tennis tournament will be
played at 4:15 and 5:15 p.m. today.
The doubles tourney will start to-
morrow afternoon at the same time.
An all-campus golf tournament will
start this week, with threesomes be-
ing played Wednesday to determine
which players will play in the cham-

league :
Reds .......
Yankees ...
Tigers
Cubs .......
Cards.....
Giants .....
Braves .....
Bees.....

............
............
............
....... .. ....
............
............
............
............

W. L. Pet.
.3 0 1.000
.3 0 1.000
.2 1 .667
.1 2 .333
1 2 .333
1 2 .333
1 3 .250
0 2 .000
0 0 .0001
0 0 .000

TROPICAL WORSTED
SU ITS
20% Discount
SLACKS, Now $2.15
$2.95 Value
Small Charge for Alterations
TROUSERS
Flannel and 4abardine
ZO% "Discount

il

MEN'S
FOOTWEAR
Now $4.85 up
Values to $12.50

Dodgers...........
Indians .............

I

.: ---
1

Typewriter,,;

Rentals

RIDER'S
302 SOUTH STATE STREET

. f
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STATE

STREET

Repair Service

Supplies

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Eat in a Clean, Cool Atmosphere

00 -00 -0 00

SPECIAL LUNCHES and DINNERS

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