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July 07, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1936-07-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T14E TMIC HT AN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 1936

...___________________U - T..M.H GA ..T .VTUS.YJUY...9

President Commemo rates July 4th At Mon ticello

England Wants
Right Of Way
ForWarships
Unrestricted Passage To
Black Sea Is Demanded
In British Draft
MONTREUX, Switzerland, July 6.
-()--Great Britain demanded today
unrestricted passage for her war-
ships to the Black Sea as the inter-
national Dardanelles conference re-I
sumed its session.
Contrary to the draft of the Turk-
ish proposal, the British demand,
created a stir among delegates called
together to consider a Turkish re-
quest to refortify the Straits, official-
ly constituted as the Dardanelles, the
Sea of Marmora and the Bosphor-
us.
(Turkey, at the first sessions which
were interrupted by the League of
Nations assembly meeting, proposed
to limit warship tonnage proceeding
eastward through the Dardanelles to
14,000 tons at any one time).
The British draft also proposed
maintenance of some form of a!
Straits commission, a feature which
Turkey eliminated from her four-
point request because she declared no
international supervision was neces-
sary.
The British statement also refused
Turkey the right to lose the Dardan-
elles when Turkish diplomats became
convinced their nation may be men-
aced by war.
The British insisted Turkey should
submit a question to the League
council which would decide by a two-
thirds vote whether Turkey was men-
aced.
H A LLE R'S
State and Liberty
Watch Repairing!

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

-Associated Press Photo.
President Roosevelt, flanked by colonial guards, is Ohwvn as he addressed a Fourth of July celebration
at Mcrnticello, Va., from the mountain top home of Thomas Jefferson. The President said "our problems of
1936 call as greatly for the continuation of imaginaticn and energy and capacity for responsibility as did
the age of Thomas Jefferson and his fellows."

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone2-1214:
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance lic per reading line
(on basis of five average words to line)
for one or two insertions. lOc per read-
ing line for three or more insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
for. two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
By Contract, per line-2 lines daily,
one month..... ..............$o
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months...........8c
2 lines daily, college year ...........7e
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months.............8c
100 lines used as desired.........$c
300 lines used as desired ...........8c
1,000 lines used as desired..........7c
2,000 lines used as desired.........6c
The above rates are per reading line
based on eight reading lines per inch
Sonic type, upper and lower case. Add
6c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and' lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7%1 point type.
READ THE WANT ADS
ENDING TODAY
Jean
H iersh iolt
,n
TOMORROW
DOUBLE FEATURE
ALL-COMEDY BILL

LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox
Careful work at low price.

dawrned.

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Selmer clarinet. New.
Will sell for $45. Reply Box 107A,
Michigan Daily.
OFFER wanted for lot twenty-one
Eastover Hills. Write W. T. God-
dard, Commerce Bldg., St. Paul,
Minn.
NOTICES
HOME cooked meals for girls served
daiily; Monday through Saturday.
M's. Morrisd433 Maynard. Phone
2-2175.

LAUNDRY
EXPERIENCED laundress doing stu-
dent laundry. Called for and2de-
livered. Telephone 4863. 2x
LAUNDRY WANTED: Student Co-
ed. Men's shirts 20c. Silks, wools,
our specialty. All bundles done sep-
arately. No markings. Personal sat-
isfaction guaranteed. Call for and
deliver. Phone 5594 any time until
7 o'clock. Silver Laundry, 607 E.
Hoover. 3x

Abnormal Heat
AddsTo. Loss
In Drouth Belt
Farmers Despair As No
Break In Temperature
Is Predicted
CHICAGO, July 6.-M)-Record
heat increased damage and distress
in the midwestern drouth belt today.
Despairing farmers pinned their
hopes for a break in the protracted
siege on a change in weather. But
none was sighted for the immediate
future. Instead, a broadening of the
high temperature blanket was fore-
cast.
Abnormal heat seared the prairies
from the Rocky mountains to wes-
tern Kentucky yesterday. All-time
marks were broken at Williston, N.
D., and Rapid City, S. D., with re-
spective readings of 110 and 106 de-
grees and at Sioux Falls, S. D., with
109. A new record of 105 was estab-
lished at Moline, Ill. Other maxima
included:
Yankton, S. D., 112, after an all-
time record high of 113 had been set
Saturday; Miles City; Mont., 108;
Hastings, Neb., 107; Bismarck, N. D.,
and Fremont, Neb., 106; Grand
Island, Neb., 105; Des Moines, Ia., and
Dickinson, N. D. 104; Havre, Mont.,
102; Omaha, Neb., 100.-
Showers Fall In South
Scattered showers fell in south-
ern and Atlantic states. Light pre-
cipitation was indicated for tomor-
row in some parts of the Dakotas,
Wisconsin and Indiana but the gen-
eral prediction was for hot, dry
weather.
With corn in a critical period, the
moisture or aridity of the next fort-
night will determine whether the
drouth destruction of 1936 will equal
the devastation of 1934 in the opin-
ion of secretary of agriculture Wal-
lace.
Thousands of Catholics in Nebras-
ka knelt at special masses yesterday
to pray for rain. They were urged
to continue their orisons. In an
episcopal letter on "these days of
alarm and distress," Bishop L. B.
Kucera of Lincoln set forth in part:
"In view of crop failures in our ter-
ritory during the past several years,
the present situation gives rise to a
most acute problem. Human in-
genuity fails completely. Poisoned
mash may conquer the grasshopper
plague but what shall we do to move
those things.which only God can con-
trol? There is but one answer. We
must pray."
Arizona Indians Pray
Out in Arizona the Navajo Indians
chanted supplications in a "rain
making" ritual.
Approximately 3,000 resourceless
farmers in Wyoming, North Dakota
and Montana were called to work on I
WPA relief projects. Administrators
planned to employ at least 50,000 in
building water conservation dams
and farm to market roads in those
states and South Dakota and Minne-
sota.
Harried planters looked to Wash-
ington for the completion of a full
program, coordinating the actvities
of all federal agencies acting in the
emergency. There-today or tomor-
row-government relief officials
planned to lay a detailed report on
the midwestern drouth and an out-
line of contemplated assistance by
President Roosevelt.
AAA spokesmen disclosed buying
of distressed cattle in the north cen-
tral states would proceed but that
there would be no immediate heavy
purchases.

EVENING RADIO
PROGRA MS

i

II
1I+

6 :00-VIJrt etonSports.
WWJ Ty'ysn
WX k-i!-ay A.
S iMusic
6:1 5-WJHif Heroes ofP'Today,
WWJ hsi ner !'our.
WXYZ y in Review.
CKLW Sports and News.
6:30--WJR Kate Smith.
wwJ Bulletins.
WXYZ Rh~ythmn Time,
CKLW Rhythm Moments.
6:45--WJR Boake Carter.
WWJ Albert lBrothers.
WXYZ Rubinoff-Rea.
CKLW Turf Talk.
7 :00-WJR Hammerstein's Music Hall.
WWJ Leo Reisman's Music.
WXYZ To Be Annoumnced.
CKLW Mario > oti Music.
7:15-WXYZ Kyte' Rhythmaires.
'7:30-=WJR Laugh with Ken Murray.
WWJ wayne King's Music.
WXYZ Edgar Guest in Welcome Valley.
CI LW (Guy Lombardo's Music.
CKLW Paul Block's Music.
f 8:00--WJR Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians.
WWJ Vox Pop.
CKLW Evening Serenade.
WXYZ Ben Bernie's Music.
8:30--WJR Rupert Iughes; Benny Good-
man's Music.
WWJ Ed Wynn, Graham McNamee.
WXYZ Goldman Band.
CKLW Melody Treasure Hunt.
8:45--WXYZ Ferde Grofe.
9:00--WWJ Meredith Wilson's Music.
WXYZ Perde Grofe.
CKLW Modern Ensemble.
9:15-WXYZ Girl Friends.
9:30-WJR March of Time.
WWJ Soloist.
WXYZ Karl Spaeth's Music.
CKLW- Shop) Fields' Music.
9:45--WJR Hot Dates in History.
WWJ Royalists.
WXYZ Police Field Day.
10:00--WJR Duncan Moore.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WXYZ Harold Nagel's Music.
CKLW Scores and News.
10:15--WJR Rhythm.
WWJT Evening Melodies.
CKLW Mal Hallett's Music.
10:30---WJR The Mummers.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Ted Lewis'. Music.
CKLW National Baseball Sixtieth
Anniversary.
10:45-WWJ Jess Crawford.
11:00 .WJR George Givot.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Jimmie Jenkins.
CKLW Enoch Light's Music.
11 :15-CKLW Mystery Lady.
WJR George Givot.
11:30'-WJR Orville Knapp's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ King's Jesters.
CKLW Tominy Tompkins' Music.
11 :45-WJR Solay and Violin.
12:00--WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Les Arquette's Music.
CKLW Ted Flo Rito's Music.
12:30-CKLW Horace Heidt's Music.
1:00-CKLW Joe Sander's Music.
Mrs. Owen Returns
To Aid Roosevelt
NEW YORK, July 6,-(')-Mrs.
Ruth Bryan Owen, United States
minister to Denmark, home on a 60-
day leave of absence, put herself to-
day "at the disposal" of the Demo-
cratic national committee in the cam-
paign for President Roosevelt's re-
election.
The daugter of the late William
Jennings Bryan arrived yesterday
from Copenhagen.
She said she planned a speaking
tour during the campaign.
Mrs. Owen said the administra-
tion's "good neighbor" policy and its
reciprocal trade treaties had pro-
duced a "helpful reaction" abroad.

Detroit Woman Killed In
Railroad Crossing Crash
HOWELL, Mich., July 6.--(IP)-Mrs,
Romina A. Stevens, 64, of 158441
Petoskey Ave., Detroit, was killed
and her husband, James A. Stevens,
was seriously injured when their
coupe collided with a passenger train
on the Ann Arbor railroad crossing,
a mile east of here on US-16 at 3
p.m. today.
Stevens, identified by his driver's
license, was taken to McPherson
Memorial Hospital, where he was un-
able immediately to give an account
of the crash. Mrs. Stevens' name
was learned from a fishing license in
her hand bag.

TODAY and WEDNESDAY
THRILLING MELODRAMA!
"Bullets or
B 1: J "
with
Edw. G. Robinson
"The Most Topical Picture
othe Year" - Tribune

Matinees aln - 25c
25e M. Flodr 35c

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