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July 02, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1936-07-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, JULY 2. 19361

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Yearbook alues
Are Emphasized
By F Hubbard
Superintendence Annual
Used As Illustration Of
Their Usefulness
A heavy stress was placed on the
value of a yearbook such as that
compiled by the Department of Su-
perintendence in a lecture delivered
yesterday afternoon in the University
High School Auditorium by Dr. Frank
W. Hubbard, associate director of the
research division of the National Ed-
ucation Association.
Dr. Hubbard placed emphasis on
the usefulness of a yearbook in pick-
ing out the more useful and promis-
ing material for educators in fields
such as Special Studies. He men-
tioned specifically the 1936 Yearbook
of the Department of Superinten-
dence.
This particular yearbook grew out
of the need to realize whither are
Social Studies going. Likewise the
Commission compiling the yearbook
felt that our society for many years
has been developing unevenly and
that anti-social conditions have
arisen. The question arises, says
Dr. Hubbard who helped in editing
this yearbook, whether the Social
Studies can serve as a corrective.
Expects Ideal Attwnents
"Naturally, we are going to have a
period of trial and exploration but
out of this transition period, may we
not fill the need for a development
of social goals, gain a greater knowl-
edge of the social processes and also
of group life?" Dr. Hubbard queried.
Dr. Hubbard brought out the fact
that the members of the Commission
who collaborated in writing this year-
book were scholars of diverse views,
training and interests. Some of the
important figures were Charles A.
Beard, .Dr. George S. Counts, Dr.
Frank N. Freeman of Chicago, Dr.
Howard E. Wilson of Harvard and Dr.
Paul T. Rankin┬░ of Detroit. These
men were in agreement that we are
going to have a democratic system of
government in the future. However
they felt that the commission should
not try "to write a blueprint of society
for the future." The Social Studies
can only recognize that changes will
occur and in the light of those
changes attempt not only to keep
abreast but point the way, Dr. Hub-
bard stated.
14 Basic Assumptions
Dr. Hubbard mentioned the four-
teen basic assumptions that the Com-
mission agreed upon. These are:
1. To revise the Social Studies
curriculum continuously in the light
of changing needs and in the light of
changing developments.
2. There are in many public
schools today Social Studies courses
of merit but most of these programs
can be and should be improved.
3. New materials should be woven
into the curriculum to replace ob-
solete materials.
4. Although basically the curricu-
lum is the same throughout the coun-
try yet peculiar local ideas and dif-
ference should be appreciated.
5. It is necessary to include con-
troversial issues to give us a more
realistic picture.
6. Schools cannot deal with all
controversial issues with equal pro-
priety. At times there may be eco-
nomic reasons that may temporarily
interfere with the program.
Teachers As Guides
7. The function of the teacher
is not to indoctrinate but to guide.

The teachers role is a judicial one.
8. The child and teacher contacts
are the very center of the Social
Studies curriculum.
9. Techniques and devices in
teaching are important but should
merely be means to an end.
10. No program is complete with-
out systematic appraisal by tests,
teacher's judgments, etc.
11. Since learning and not teach-
ing is of first importance emphasis
should be placed on procedures that
help students appraise their own
work.
12. The local community should
be a laboratory for the Social Studies
program.
13. The Yearbook is really a
sourcebook for the guidance of those
in the field of Social Studies.
14. There is a vital relationship
between the Social Studies and other
fields such as art, languages, litera-
ture and even the forces outside of
the school proper.
Where TOGo
2 p.m.: Tour of campus.
5 p.m.: Lecture, by Dr. Carl V.
Weller on "What Every Layman
Should Know About Cancer," Na-
tural Science Auditorium.
7 p.m.: Theatres: Majestic, "13
Hours by Air" with Fred MacMurray
andi na'i n ann a'~f t 1- rid " a am va n,a

_ __ i f

Canada's Minister

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

i

-Associated Press Photo.
Sir Hut.ert Marier (above) is the
newly-appointed Canadian minister
to the United States,succeeding
the Han. W. D. Herridge.
FacultymStudent
Reception Will
Be Held Friday
Dr. And Mrs. L.A. Hopkins
To Head Receiving Line
At 8:30 P.M. In League
The Michigan League will be the
scene of the Faculty Reception Fri-
day night, to be given for students
and members of the faculty.
Dr. and Mrs. Louis A. Hopkins will
head the receiving line in the Ethyl
Fountain Hussey room. Students
will be received from 8:30 to 9:30,
and new faculty members and their
hosts will be received from 9:30 to
10:30. Present members of the fac-
ulty will be received throughout the
evening.
Persons are requested to use the
theatre stairs and to proceed from
there to the receiving line. Girls
have been appointed to introduce
people to the receiving line.
Varied entertainment will be of-
fered free of charge, and dancing in
both the League Ballroom and the
Grand Rapids Room will last from
9:30 p.m. to 1:00. Bridge may be
played any timne on the third floor in
the Alumnae Room. Either contract
or auction may be played, and prizes
will be given to high scorers. In
the League Dining Room fortune-
telling will be offered.
Members of the receiving line have
been announced as follows: Dr. and
Mrs. Hopkins, Regent and Mrs. Ju-
nius E. Beal, Vice-President and Mrs.
Clarence S. Yoakum, Vice-President
and Mrs. James D. Bruce, Dean and
Mrs. Joseph A. Bursley, and Dean
and Mrs. Herbert A. Sadler.
Other members are: Dean and Mrs.
'Henry M. Bates, Dean and Mrs. Clare
E. Griffin, Dean and Mrs. James B.
Edmonson, Dean and Mrs. Albert C.
Furstenberg, Dr. and Mrs. John
Sundwall, Prof. and Mrs. Earl V.
Moore, Mrs. Byrl Bacher, Miss Ethyl
McCormick, and Prof. and Mrs. Louis
M. Eich.
Punch will be served in the League
Garden, which will be lighted with
a spotlight and Chinese lanterns. Va-
rious exhibits of faculty members will
be shown, and there will be hostesses
to aid the guests.
200 To Participate
In Pageant Tonight
An all city playground pageant,
with a cast of 200 children, will be
presented at 8:30 today at West Park,
it was announced yesterday by L. L.
Holway director of athletics in the
city school system.
The pageant, which was written
and directed by Arthur Wright, will
consist of songs, and various types
of dances. Children of all ages will
take part, and in addition there will
be marching by the Ann Arbor Amer-
ican Legion Drum and Bugle corps,
songs by the colored Civic Chorus,
and music by the Community Orches-
tra. The children taking part arel
attending playgroundskall over the
city.
The pageant will be of particular
interest to teachers who are attend-
ing summer school.

SPECIALS!
PERMANENTS
$3.50
Regular $5.00 Value

VOL. XVI No. 4
THURSDAY, JULY 2, 1936
Notices
Michigan Repertory Players: The
final performance of Henrik Ibsen's
"John Gabriel Borkman" will be
presented tonight at 8:30 p.m. in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Pa-
trons planning to buy season tickets
are urged to purchase them immed-
iately.
Special Matinee: There will be a
special matinee performance of
"Squaring the Circle" tomorrow af-
ternoon at 3:30 in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre. Prices for the
performance will be 50c for the main
floor and 35c for the balcony. There
will be no Friday night performance
because of the University Reception.
Men's Education Club: There will
be an organization of the Men's Ed-
ucation Club baseball teams at South
Ferry Field, at 4 p.m. today. I
Prof. David E. Mattern of the
School of Music will lecture todayat;
4:05 p.m. on "The 1936 Yearbook of
the National Society for the study of
Education, Part I," in University
High School Auditorium.
Summer Session Men's Glee Club:
All men in the University are cordial-
ly invited to join the Summer Ses-
sion Men's Glee Club, which meets in
Morris Hall Thursday nights from
7 to 8 p.m.
David Mattern, Director.
Seniors, School of Education: The
following is a tentative list of the
students who may graduiate at the
close of the present Summer Session.
Please check this list and report any
omissions by Friday noon, July 3, to
the Registrar's office, Room 4, U.H.
Frank Lee Allen, Gunnard John
Antell, Joseph Ellis Biller, Marian
Cordelia 'Bullen, Adelaine Callery.
Thomas Imogene Caudill, Florence
E. Goodenough, Rose MaGe Kern,
Adah Loomis Miller, Esther Grace
Pease, Sarah Francis Redden, Iva
Lovina Robertson, LucilleMaye Sel-
lers, Helen Hansel Spiro, Marjorier
Stefan, Lona LaVerne Trott, Garnet
Peryl Waggoner, Elizabeth Frey
Winne.
Seniors, College of Architecture:
The following is a tentative list of
(Continued on Page 4)

~~1

For a,".Cle,.an and
Economical Summer

C LEAN CLOTHES are cool clothes and
that's a necessity during Summer. And
hmore important is the fact that this can all
be done cheaper for you than ever before.
The Ann Arbor laundries have taken your
pocket books into consideration and are
now offering their special services in a new
Student Bundle. You'll say the prices are
really ridiculously low when you see that
your clothes are Washed by the same excel-
lent processes as those that are charged the
reu'elar priced

i

__w

Price per. Pound

lOc

esw
.:

.

(Minimum Bundle - 50c)

BEFORE-THE-FOURTH
SPECIALS
AT
MILTONS
SUITSA"
BROKEN LOTS
One and Two of a Pattern, but
there are sizes from 34 to 48.
These are MILTONS Quality
garments .- Our $16.50 and
$22.50 Values .. .
$11.90 and $17.90
The EXTRA The EXTRA
TROUSERS $390 TROUSERS 4.90
SUMMER
LINEN and TROPICAL
SUITS
10.00 and$1350
BLUES - BROWNS and
FANCY CHECKS - - -
Z$11. a0 0

Shirts, Extra

0 00 lOc

Full Dress Shirts not included in this Service.

Sox, Extra, pair
Handkerchiefs,

.2c
Extra I c

Sample Bundle
(Finished Service)
6 HANDKERCHIEFS
3 SHIRTS
3 PAIRS OF SOX
(Folded - Ready to Wear)
2 SUITS UNDERWEAR
2 BATH TOWELS
1 PAJAMA SUIT
*Cost"92C

Shirts, handkerchiefs and socks are

finished to meet the most critical

eye

SUMMER
SLACKS
Large stocks to choose from.
Sanforized Shrunk - All Sizes.
$1.45 to $2.95
Complete Furnishing Depart-
ment . . . Moderately priced.
OPEN FRIDAY NIGHT

while underwear and pajamas are
washed and folded ready for wear.
WHITE SWAN LAUNDRY
and DRY CLEANING COMPANY
Phone 4117

KYER LAUNDRY
Phone 4185

I

k

®..

lb

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