100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 27, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1933-07-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE 'MICHIGAN DAILY'

Forty Students
Are Attending
Law Meetings
A total of 40 students are enrolled
in the International Law Conference
here, figures released yesterday show.
An alphabetical list of those attend-
ing the conference follows:
Akzin, Benjamin, Harvard Univer-
sity; Bachman, Paul S., University of
Hawaii, Honolulu; Bishop, William
W. Jr., University of Michigan; Ca-
hall, Raymond D., Kenyon College
Gambier, 0.; Calderwood, Howard B.,
University of Michigan; Clyde, Win-
ona, Annie Wright Seminary, Ta-
coma, Wash.; Crow, William L.,
Lawrence College, Appleton, Wis.;
Culp, Maurice S., University of Mich-
igan; Deere, Lora L., University of
Illinois, Urbana, Ill.; De La Rue,
Harry, Southwestern Louisiana Insti-
tute, Lafayette, La.; Dorr, Harold M.,
University of Michigan; Faust, Allen
K., Catawba College, Salisbury, N. C.
Feemster, Silas C., University of
Nevada,, Reno, Nev.; Finch, Elea-
nor, George Washington University,
Washington, D. C.; Fouts, George,
University of Redlands, Redlands,
Calif.; 'Funston, Arthur, Earlham
College, Richmond, Ind.; Gilbert,
Amy M., Elmira College, Elmira, N.
Y.; Hagan, Charles B., Duke Univer-
sity, Durham, N. C.; Harley, Herbert,
Secretary, American Judicature So-
ciety; Hartwig, Lawrerce E., Univer-
sity of Michigan; Holcomb, Horace
G., Shurtleff College, Alton, Ill.;
Johnson, Claudius 0., State College
of Washington, Pullman, Wash.
Kauper, Paul G. University of
Michigan; Laatsch, Melvin H., Uni-
versity of Vermont, Burlington, Vt.;
Lenoir, James J., University of Illi-
nois, Urbana, Ill.; LePage, Samuel M.,
Penn College, Oskaloosa, Ia.; Lory,
Hillis, Denison University, Granville,
0.; Lucas, William C., University of
Michigan; Magers, Roy V., Park Col-
lege, Parkville, Mo.; McCaffree, Floyd
E., University of Michigan; McMa-
hon, John L., Catholic University of
America, Washington, D. C.
Osgood, Laura, University of Mich-
igan; Peterson, Henry J., University
of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyo.; Reiff,
Henry, St. Lawrence University, Can-
ton, N Y.; Reynolds, George M., Cen-
tenary College of Louisiana, Shreve-
port, La.; Roden, Albert A., George-
town School of Foreign Service,
Washington, D. C.; Stewart, 'Edgar I.,
Yankton College, Yankton, S. D.;
Timm, Charles A., University of
Texas, Austin, Tex.; Trautwein, Dor-
othy, Wellesley College, Wellesley,
Mass.; Wahrenbrock, Howard E.,
University of Michigan.
Government Acting To
Put Halt To Kidnaping
(Continued from Page 1)
tain." They told him that because
of the publicity "you have been seek-
ing, and the erroneous returns you
have received by cutting in with your
so-called beer, our rate must be one
and one-half times normal or $ 150,-
000 for a' full life paid up policy."
Payments of $10,000 would be per-
missible, the extortionist said.
"This will protest you against kid-
naping which would require payment
by us as intermediators of $200,000
at least," wrote the extortionist.
SAN FRANCISCO, July 26.-OP)--
Governors attending their annual
conference today asked the Federal
Government to pursue to the utmost
its prosecution of racketeers "to the
end that kidnaping and other kind-
red crimes be supressed."
The Federal Government's crusade
against kidnaping kept pace Wed-
nesday with a rising tide of public
indignation over the Nation.

In the Capital Attorney General.
Homer S. Cummings let it be known
after a conference with President
Roosevelt that t h e Government
would spare no expense to stamp out
kidInaping.
Plans for forming a Federal "Scot-I
land Yard"' were discussed.
Although authorities at half a
dozen points won victories over kid-
napers and organized gangs, there
appeared no lessening in kidnaping
and crime.

The News Of The World As Illustrated In Associated Press Pictures

LONDONDERRY *-

Mrs. Frank Nash, widow of the
convict killed in the union station
shooting at Kansas City, is shown
being arraigned there on a charge
of conspiring to obstruct justice.

General Balbo and his Italian air armada, shown here, are now in Newfoundland awaiting repairs
one of the planes, whose water pump was damaged yesterday. They are on their way back to Rome
a more direct route than the one they pursued on the way here.

on
by

John Barber Wins 50-Yd.
Backstroke In Tourney
In the 50-yard backstroke event of
the summer swimming . tournament,
held yesterday at the Intramural
pool, John Barber won first place.
His time was 40:3 seconds. E. Keeton
and C. Conger took second and third
places respectively.
The next event of the summer
tournament will be the 100-yard free-
style race, to be run at 5:15 p. m.
Monday at the Intramural pool.
Municipal Body
To Use Saline
As Model City
(Continued from Page 1).
Harold D. Smith, director of the mu-
nicipal league, has announced, and
will continue until all phased of the
city's operation have been studied.
An audit will be the first step, and
it will be followed by such steps as,
are necessary to provide the city with
a model accounting and recording
system.
The operation of the fire depart-
ment, water department and sewage
system will all be considered. The
fire department, for example, is a
volunteer organization and may re-
quire some changes to reach a peak
of efficiency. The water department
has all of its services metered and
there may be a question as to
whether all meters are working prop-,
erly. All other functions will be stud-
ied in detail, the object being to pro-
mote efficiency and effect economies
-in short, to make the business of
the city operate at maximum effi-
ciency.
"We don't know what we will find
in Saline, but we're going to solve
whatever problems it may have," Mr.
Smith says. "We have the full coop-
eration of Mayor Mark Sugden and
of the council. And whatever condi-
tions we do find that need correction
may serve as a suggestion to other
cities and villages.
"Relatively few cities operate on a
basis of maximum efficiency, but
much attention has been given to
problems involving the governments
of large cities. The small municipal-
ity, on the other hand, has had scant
attention, and I dare say that most
of them could save themselves money
by making changes here and there,"
he says.
"In many of these places there are
few, if any, full-time employees, and
the town's business therefore is given
only such time as officials can take
away from their own work. We are
hopeful that a very close study made
,by, the League staff will result in a
model accounting and recording sys-
tem, model ordinances, and so forth,
in addition to the highly satisfactory
governmental organization Saline al-
ready has, so that we can apply the
results of this close study of one
community to many in Michigan and
the entire nation."

Dr. Bell Calls Curtailment Of
Physical Education Dangerous

(Continued from Page 1)
terest lies in the education of women'
for an effective happy life, as a for-1
mer teacher of physical education in
the high schools, elementary schools,
and, the Teachers College of Chicago,
as well as a former instructor in
the South Park Playgrounds, I can
not resist the challenge that con-
fronts' one of my convincing and in-
valuable experience to comment upon
this recent drastic action of the Chi-
cago Board of Education in its
change of policy in regard to physical
education.
Such short-sighted actions could
only take place in the face of negli-
gence or honest lack of information
as to the desirable contributions that
properly conducted physical educa-
tion has to make toward the com-
plete education of our children.
What well-to-do person would tol-
erate his child being robbed of his
opportunity to play basketball, base-
ball, tennis, golf, to swim, or to play
any sport under suitable conditions
with educated men as teachers?
What fathe'r would leave such mat-
ters as the growth, the physical de-
velopment, the social and moral edu-
cation of his boy to the chance edu-
cation of the vacant lots, alleys,
dives? Not many men. Most men as-
pire to sons who will be good citizens,
leaders-vigorous, courageous sons
who are happy sportsmen in the
keenest kind of competition. Chicago
can not afford such education for
its sons and daughters. It's too ex-
pensive.
It seems incredible that Chicago
of all cities'could tolerate such ob-
solete educational procedure. Chicago
was the first great city to recognize
the educational advantages of well-
taught physical education. As early
as 1905, Chicago opened the South
Park Playgrounds and demonstrated

the effects of good competitive sport
in the control of the vicious neigh-
borhood gangs. Through its system of
playgrounds directing high class ath-
letic leagues, citizens and leaders, in-
stead of hoodlums, were thrown into
society.
These aims of physical education
are not imaginary. They are real.
They are educational and supported
by demonstrable evidence from the
experiences of Chicago schools and
playgrounds. Anyone interested could
read the recent $100,000 survey of
the Chicago Public Schools made by
the Stayer Committee and find out
how this department was rated by
critical appraisers. School records of
past achievements are in the files
But my plea isdirected to an ap-
peal to stop thisshort-sighted action
of the board by demonstrating that
while spontaneous play and recrea-
tion will go oq.n youth and adoles-
cence directed or undirected, such
undirected play, experience has prov-
en without question, falls far short
of what Chicago as a pioneer has
proven to all. Does anyone in this
day and age believe that proper phys-
ical education should only be avail-
able to children of the wealthy?
To quote from the Children's Char-
ter of the White House Conference on
Child Health and Protection-"Each
child ftom birth through adolescence
is entitled to the promotion of health,
including health instruction and a
health program, wholesome physical
and mental recreation, with teachers
and leaders adequately trained."
DANCE Jack Nelson's Band
Free adm. Park plano
OCEAN or 50c couple
BEAC H Via Saline, Clinton,
PIE R and Brooklyn, to
r I Clark'sLake

WE DO OUR'PART
Here is the new badge of the
national recovery administration.
Hugh S. Johnson, administrator,
plans to have the badge of co-oper-
ation displayed by all factories and
employers co-operating in signing
codes and agreements for their in-
dustries.
FOR THAT TIRED FEELING
BERLIN, July 26.--UP)-An auto-
matic information bureau has been'
put up on Kurfeurstendamm, Berlin's
Broadway.
"Informator," the the machine is
called, tells about street-car, bus and
subway connections, the location of
foreign embassies, the ministries, po-
lice stations and theatres.
Its front shows 180 buttons, each
of which, when pressed, produces a
long list of addresses.

Arno B. Cammerer of Nebraska
is the new director of the national
park service.
Socialists Plan
IMass .Meeing
About Mooney
Local liberal and radical groups are
cooperating in staging a Tom Mooney
mass meeting at '7:30 p. mn., tonight,
in Natural Science Auditorium, ac-
cording to an announcement by the
Michigan Socialist Club.
Groups participating include the
Socialist Club, the Civil Liberties
Union, the Socialist Party, the Com-
munist Party, the National Stildent
League, and the International Labor
Defense.
Al Renner of Detroit, who helped
form the Communist party in this
country and who is at present a
leader of the Proletarian Party will
be the principal speaker.
A local "United Front (ommittee
for Tom Mooney" has been set up
consisting of representatives of the
above mentioned groups. Though
these groups differ widely on ques-
tions of program and tactics, they all
agree in the demand for Mooney's
release, it was said.
"The fact of the matter is," said
a representative of the local commit-
tee, "that Tom Mooney is at present
serving a life sentence for the murder
of one of the victims of the San
Francisco preparedness day parade
bomb explosion in 1916, while he ac-
tually stands acquitted in the courts
of the murder of another victim of
the explosion. That he was framed is
now the opinion of most persons who
know the history of the case, in-

CL ASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns clioseat three
o'clock previous to day of in.sertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance-11 per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
l0c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
Telephone rate-15c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
14c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By contract, per line--2 lines daily, one
month. .. .................Se
4 lines E. 0. D., 2 months ......... 3c
2 lines daily, college year........7c
4 lines E. 0. D., college year......7c
100 lines used as desired.........9c
300 lines used as desired..........8c
1,000 lines used as desired........7c
2,000 lines used as desired........ G
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
6c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add Oc per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
Capital letters.
The abovg rates are for 7%,12 point
type.
TYPING
TYPING
Seven Cents a Page
PHONE 2-1636
Leave Name and Address
Quick Service
15
REASONABLE RATES-Quick serv-
ice. Phone 2-1988.
WANTED
WILL-Pay cash for used ladies' bi-
cycle. Write Box 5, Michigan Daily.
WANTED TO BUY MEN'S OLD AND
new suits and overcoats, Will pay
3, 4, 5 and 8, 9 dollars. Phone Ann
Arbor, 4306 Chicago Buyer. 34c
NOTICE
LEARN TO PLAY-Popular music.
Max Gail. University Music House.
Tuesday afternoons, or phone 4917.
21c
cluding Judge Franklin A. Griffin
who originally passed sentence on
Mooney. It behooves all those sym-
pathetic to the cause of labor to unite
and exert all possible pressure on
Governor Rolph of California to
grant Mooney a pardon."
At the meeting tonight a resolution
will be drafted and telegraphed to
Governor Rolph, according to organ-
izers. Also a petition to the governor
urging Mooney's pardon will be
launched.

h A

KODAKS

a

DRUGS

CAA LIN-FLETCHE

Dependable Drug Stores,

Are always FIRST with the Latest

FOUR NE
La Geraldine's Hair

AttedCool WashAedr
TWO FIRST-RUN FEATURE PICTURES
The Story Of "LAUGHTER
Temple Drake" IN HELL'
Miriam Hopkns Pat O'Brien

l

'fV
/;,/
,ijy I j

W
Preparations
WAVE TRAINING LOTION
INSTO - WAVE
SOAPLESS SHAMPOO
DE VILBISS ATOMIZER
in a rubber lined suede bag.
$2.50 Value
All for $1.25
'II II l/ /

95c Value!
THREE 15c
HALF & HALF
TO18ACCO
-and-
ONE 50c
BRIAR PIPE

All for

49c

"t

I

54c
Gillette
Blades
14C
with every purchase
of a 35c tube of
Williams Glider
Shave

gz
F1 n s
j1

- Only
Two More
Days

MAJESTIC AttenaCool

s. 15c -Nights 25c

Now Playing!
DOUBLE FEATURE

"MAEDCHEN
IN UNIFORM"

PnI'vY IinxA/ i-IL)VVur~

r

Jack Holt,

Two Pei
2
44

rfo

AN UNUSUAL LOVE STORY
rmances Daily All Seats Reserved
5 -- 8:25 at 40c

V -- W . 1u

Ralph Graves, and
Lila Lee, in
"'War
Correspondent"
also

1 Marriages in Iowa fell off more in
1932 than in any other state, de-
creasing 43.5 per cent.

go.

4

To Our Soda Fountains!
Special This Week!
PEACH MELBA ,
SUNDAE.............15C5c
Rich, Creamy Vanilla Ice Cream, Topped with "-
Fresh Peaches and Whipped Cream

MEMO

i

I

GLAZO
ANNOUNCES
THEIR ENTIRE LINE
IN A
NEW PACKAGE
AT-

GLZO'
CUTiCI.
RE'OER.
%~b .A

MAKE ONE -
GILLETTE OR
PROBAK BLADE
LAST A YEAR
IF-

H. B Warner
Rpttp Davrie knnc

'~'1UII1U~7 /1

I

I'

I'

1111

fl

I A r

11

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan