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July 11, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1933-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Word Received
From Director
Of Camp Davis
Johnston Tells Of Work
At Wyoming Surveying
Field Station
First reports to be received here of
the work being done at Camp Davis,
the University surveying station in
the Jackson Hole country near Jack-
son, Wyoming, came yesterday in the
form of a letter to The Daily from
Prof. Clarence T. Johnston, director
of the camp.
The organization of the camp in-
cludes 21 students, five regular staff
members, one instrument man, and
one student assistant, according to
Professor Johnston.
Excerpts from his letter, dated
July 4, follow:
"We are working as usual today.
We will also work one Saturday aft-
ernoon, which earns us a day and
. half which will be at the disposal
:f the students toward the end of
July when they visit Yellowstone
Park over a week-end.
Camp is In Mountain Valley
"The camp and surrounding coun-
try must be seen to be understood.
We live in a mountain valley about
a mile wide and three miles long. We
are surrounded by mountains run-
ning from 1,500 to 4,000 feet above
Us and the elevation of the camp
grounds is 6,100 feet above sea level.
"The valley lands are coverea with
a growth of grass, many kinds of
flowering plants, and sagebrush. We
have no brush or trees to cut in con-
nection with out field work and no
troublesome insects. Many birds
nest in and about the camp and elk,
deer, and other wild animals graze
on the mountain slopes and in the
valleys that extend back from the
"Hoback River.
"The river runs within five min-
utes walk of the camp. It is a trout
stream, averaging over 100 feet wide
and too swift and deep to ford ex-
cept during periods of unusually low
water. Our work, unlike most Uni-
versity activities, relates to measure-
ment. We deal with lines and angles
that cannot be seen, and hence even
a visitor who spends much time here
understanls but little about field
operations or the results thereof.
"We cannot bring these to Ann Ar-
bor and put them on display. Stu-
dents who enroll here must be well
grounded in mathematics and related
subjects, or they never get very far
in our work. We have several gradu-
ate students, or students who have
taken graduate work and four stu-
-dents are now pursuing advanced
work in triangulation and related
subjects.
Weather is Good
"We are 'having ideal weather, as
usual. The days are bright and pleas-
ant. We never have uncomfortably
warm weather and from two to four
blankets are needed at night.
"We have a very comfortable camp,
running water in all buildings, elec-
tric lights, .hot and cold showers, a
splendid mess, and a modern sani-
tary system. The ground at the camp
is composed of disintegrated shale.
This year we have a small garden
that supplies fresh vegetables for the
mess
"A number of the government for-
estry camps are located near us.
Much work is now in progress on the
local roads. Four years ago, when
we came here to establish the camp,
we drove over 900 miles of gravel
road. This year the roads were hard
except for three or four sections hav-
ing a total mileage of less than 300.
Within two years, we will have hard
roads the entire distance of 1,700

miles."
Republicans Meet To
Decide On Party Plans
WASHINGTON, July 10. -(AP) -
Republicans from eight states meet
in Chicago Tuesday to discuss with
party leaders plans for regaining the
power that last November's ballot-
ing swept away.
Their first efforts, already begun,
will be directed toward cutting down
the Democratic majority of nearly
100 in the House of Representatives.
All House members come up for elec-
tion in 1934, as do 32 members of
the senate. In 1936 there is the Pres-
idential election,
The Chicago meeting, under the
leadership of Everett Sandors, chair-
man of the Republican national
committee, will bring together the
national chiefs and representatives
from Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Ken-
tucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Wiscon-
sin and Iowa.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
The News Of The World As Illustrated In Associated Press Pictures

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

The resignation of A. C. Tawse
as superintendent of the Lorton,
Va., reformatory was ascribed as
the cause of unrest amcng 1,150
prisoners which necessitated the
dispatch of heavily-armed police
squads from Washington, D. C., to
guard against an outbreak.

This s rikinig "close-up" of Col. Charles A. LUnibergh "in action" shows the famous Lone Eagle
flying a low-wing monoplane over Long Island in a te preparatory to his flight to Greenland where he
and Mrs. Lindbc rgh will lma ae a survey of possibiliti vs fNr a northern route from the United States to
Eurocm.

Since the machine-gun slaying
of four peace officers near the un-
ion station in Kansas City, deputy
sheriffs of Jackson county have
been equipped with collapsible ar-
mor plate like that shown here. It
was used in the capture of James
"Fur" Sammons, held as a suspect
in the June 17 slayings.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at three
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance-11 per reading .line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
10c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
Telephone rate--1c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
14c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By contracit, per line-2 lines daily, one
month. ...............8c
4 lines E. 0. D., 2 months ......... 3c
2 lines daily, college year........7c
4 lines E. 0. D., college year......7c
100 lines used as desired.......... 9c
300 lines used as desired.......... 8c
1,000 lines used as desired ......... 7c
2,000 lines used as desired ......... 6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
6 per line to aboverrates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for-
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7',x point
type.
TYPING
TYPING
Seven Cents a Page
PHONE 2-1636
Leave Name and Address
Quick Service
15
WANTED
HOME COOKING-For Jewish boys.
611 Hoover St. Phone 2-3478. 18c
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY - Soft water. 2-1044.
Towels free; socks darned.
13c
STUDENT AND FAMILY LAUNDRY
-Good soft water-will call for
and deliver. Telephone 4863. 12c
WASHING-And ironing wanted.
Guaranteed satisfactory. Call for
and deliver. 611 Hoover. Phone
2-3478. 17c
BICYCLES
RENT A BIKE-Russell Reed. Ray-
ment Radio. Next to Witham's,
South University. Phone 2-1335.
20c
Francis Holloway attended Ge-
neva, Ala., schools 12 years without
missing a day, averaged 94 in his
high school studies, was captain of
the football team and president of
the student council.

Happy over having lowered her own women's transcontinental
record to 17 hours, 7, minutes, Amelia Earhart Putnam is shown
just after landing at "Newark, N. J., airpert to be greeted by news-
paper men and her husband, George Palmer Putnam (right).

Frankie Parkjer (right) of Milwaukee is shown with the trophy
he earned by winning the national clay courts tennis title at Chicago
with a 6-3, 6-3, 6-3 victory over Gene Mako (left) of Los Angeles in
a final involving two 17-year-olds.

Willia G. Carr Lectures At
School Of Education Meting

(Continued from Page 1)
schools must be generously support-
ed out of public funds, (3) teachers
should be professionally trained,
and, (4) the moral development of
children is the crucial phase of edu-
cation.
Charles Eliot was called "the
architect of an educational system
adaptd to American life, a wise in-
terpreter of the age in which he
lived, a counsellor of the American
people for half a century, a great
scholar and administrator, and a
leader of men," with which Mr. Carr
concluded the conference.
A change in the dates for two of
the coining conferences was an-
nounced yesterday by Prof. Thomas
Diamond of the vocational education

department, who is in charge of the
summer program.
Today's conference will be given
by Dr. Margaret Bell, professor of
physical education, on "The Re-
sponsibility of the Teacher in Re-
gard to Personal Health." The con-
ference originally scheduled for to-
day, "Resume of Michigan Legisla-
tion Affecting Education," by Prof.
Arthur B. Moehlman, has been post-
poned until Tuesday, July 18.
^ DA NCE Jack Nelson's Band c
Free adm. Park plan
OCEAN or 50c couple ^
j BEAC H Via Saline, Clinton,
E and Brooklyn, to
-PIER Clark'sake

Students Invited To Play
In Bridge Tournament
University men and women stu-
dents have been invited to play
tonight in the contract bridge tour-
nament being sponsored by the
League, Miss Ethel McCormick, so-
cial director of women, said yester-
day.
Plans have been made to awardl
cups to the winners, she said, and
those wishing to play may come with
or without partners. Play will begin
at 8 p. m. There will be a small fee
charged all entrants to cover ex-
penses occurred.

Mats. 15c - Nights 25c

I

1 ! {

Attend Cool MICHIGAN
Matinees

Washed
Air

Last Day
DOUBLE FEATURE

Wallpaper Exhibit Shows
Early American Scenes
KASSEL, Germany - (/P) - Wall-
)aper showing American scenes, in-
;luding the western frontier of a
.entury ago and Niagara Falls, were
>n exhibition here at the tenth an-
niversary of the German Wallpaper
Auseum.
The museum is the only one of
;ts kind in Europe.
Private collectors and industrial
concerns were among the exhibitors.
One department demonstrated the
methods of printing wallpaper from
the earliest days to the present.
pork chop suey
with steamed rice
12c
swift's corn beef
and boiled new cabbage
14c
all soups, vegetables, salads,
potatoes, desserts, pies, cakes,
and beverages
5c
THE TAVERN
cleanliness
CA FETERIA
338 Maynard
mike fingerle, prop.

0

John "Jake the Barber" Factor,
Chicago speculator who has been
fighting extradition to London on
a swindling charge, was kidnaped
by a band of armed men in Chi-
cago.

i

I

1 I I

Koes

It-

Student-Fcul ty

ireories

On Sole

I

JUNE CLYDE

Student

Sl

What a situation! The husband arranges a rendezvous
with his sweetheart in a lonely country mansion! The
wife intrudes by chance! And when WIFE AND
SWEETHEART MEET it's one of the most thrilling,
heart-gripping scenes you've ever witnessed!

i

'THRILL OF YOUTH'
and
LEE TRACY
"NIGHT MAYOR"

Publications Bldg.

Union

League

'"When Ladies _et"
with
ANN HARDING - ROBERT MONTGOMERY
*--* --*

Wahr's Slater's

Comedy
News

AJESTI Attend Cool
Matinees

"THE EAGLE

-Wednesday - Thursday-
TWO BIG FEATURES
JACK HOLT in
"This Sporting Age"
and-
PAT O'BRIEN
MAE CLARKE
"FINAL EDITION"
OWN

4c

I

Black and White
Brown and White
Nunn Bush Shoes
$6,OO
White Buckskin
Shoes
$5.50 to $6.00

AND THE

Buy your copy today

FREDERICK |
MARCH i I

CARY III
GRANT

JACK
OAKIE

11

' ' 8
...C a n n ..vr . s.,uin4.f

Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre

OPENING TOMORROW 8:30 P. M.

STA IONERY CLEARANCE
Many Boxes of Fine Quality Writing Papers, some of which are
slightly soiled or odd lot, regularly priced up to $1.50.

oL

Uncle Ton's a

Now Priced 50c the Box

Scffell

THRU SATURDAY (Special Matinee Saturday 2:30)

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at

1il II n_ - ...1 I

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