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June 30, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1933-06-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

School Changes
Are Discussed
By Frederick
Second Education School
Conference Is Held On
National Survey Data
(Continued from Page 1)
followed proportionally by social
science, music, industrial arts, and
science." This change was accounted
for in the survey, Mr. Frederick said,
by the fact that there has been a
decided trend away from foreign
languages and mathematics as re-
quired subjects, while it has also
been toward the social sciences and
physical education.
A change in the organiaztion of
the American high school was called
a second general trend by Mr. Fred-
erick. He pointed out that-in 1929-
30 68 per cent of pupils enrolled in
the six upper grades of the public
school system were in conventionally
organized schools and 32 per cent
were in junior and senior high
schools. Now, among the reorganized
schools the three-year junior and
senior high schools tend to be the
largest, and next in order come four-
year senior high schools and two-
year junior high schools. The small-
est schools were said to be the four-
year junior high schools, while un-
divided six-year high schools in-
creased in number more rapidly than
any others in the period covered.
Consolidation of schools in rural
areas was called by Mr. Frederick a
need, because it would tend to make
them larger and thus afford oppor-
tunity fo much improvement. This
was indicated by the fact that
among small schools the representa-
tive effects of limited enrollment is
so great that the type of organiza-
tion is relatively of little moment,
he said.
"Four major characteristics which
distinguish superior types of school
organizationsu Mr. Frederickscon-
tinued, "are as follows: (1) posses-
sion of large enrollments in separate
grades, (2) adoption of grade com-
binations which free the school from
a separate pattern, (3) provision for
the close association of junior and
senior units, and (4) recognition of
the junior and senior high school
grades as co-ordinate units."
The general trend in admission re-
quirements for institutions of higher
learning was said by Mr. Frederick
to be toward increasing the number
of ways by which students may gain
admission, and, at the same time,
often raising the requirements in
single methods. Information is se-
cured regarding the students' scho-
lastic, social, and economic back-
ground, health, character rating, and
special interests.
Freshman week, educational guid-
ance, orientation courses, intramural
athletics, and other modern devices
for reducing "freshman mortality"
were mentioned by Mr. Frederick in
closing.

Stevens Picks

Sierra's 'The Romantic
Young Lady' To Open
Here Next Week
Thomas Wood Stevens, visiting di-
rector of the Michigan Repertory
Players, yesterday made known his
cast for "The Romantic Young
Lady," the modern Spanish comedy
by G. Martinez-Sierra which will be
produced at Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre July 5, 6, and 8. The cast in-
cludes some favorite Michigan ac-
tors, and some who have received in-
teresting training elsewhere.
Martha Ellen Scott, who has been
with the Players during the past two
seasons, will play the part of
Rosario, the romantically inclined
young lady. Miss Scott is known to
Ann Arbor for her excellent work in
"Barkeley Square," "Liliom," and "A
Marriage of Convenience." -
Jay Edward Pozz, who is spending
his first summer with the Repertory
group and will play opposite her in
the role of De Cordoba, is known for
his work as Captain Stanhope in
"Journey's End," produced here this
spring.
Dorothy M. Crane will play the
part of Dona Barbarita.' She comes
to Ann Arbor for a second summer of
study from Newport News, Va., where
she is director of dramatics at the
local high school, and also manager
of the Newport News Little Theatre.
Glad Diehl, who has played Clara
in this week's production of "Hay
Fever" has been cast for the part of
Maria Pepa, the old servant.
The part of Irene, the secretary,
will be played by Ella Haith, who
came here after undergraduate work
at Carnegie Drama School.
Frances K. Johnson, who is known
for her work this week in "Hay
Fever," will play the part ofAmalia,
the temperamental cabaret dancer
of the piece.
As the romantic young lady's
brothers are Herbert Hirschman,
Wayne Smith, and Dwight Thomas.
Hirschman will go to the Yale
Drama School for graduate work in
dramatic production in August.
Thomas has had experience with the
company in connection with the
Phildela Rice School of the Spoken
Word at Martha's Vineyard.
Arthur Secord, who plays Guiller-
mo, the valet, has been with the
Players since their first summer in
1929, and Edward E. Freed, who will
play Don Juan, the critic, has been
connected with the Players for two
seasons.
TYPEWRITERS -PORTABLE
New, Seoon.-and Rebilt,
Snith-Corona, Noiseless,
Underwood, Royal, Remington.
Sol&e .te St ifbred.
314 S. State St., Ann Arbor.

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SPEND A QUIET EVENING
ON THE HURON RIVER
Safe, Sound, Easy Paddling OLD TOWN CANOES FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY
Huron River at Foot of Cedar St. Phone 9313

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FOOD OFFER EVER MADE
IN ANN ARBOR...

Just think of it!

All Food Portions Served For 5c-Salads,
Vegetables, Pies, Cakes, Drinks - in
fact all food portions excepting Meats
and Fish, which are only 8 to 15c. The
same standard of quality for which we
are known all over Ann Arbor - the
same fine service from an electric cafe-
teria counter - plenty of clean tables in
this sparkling clean cafeteria.
YOU CAN AFFORD TO EAT AT THIS QUALITY FOO
CAFETERIA WITH THESE
LOW PRICES
TWO MEALS DAILY
11:30 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. 5:15 P.M. to 7:30 P.M.

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