100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 11, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1933-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Former Editor
On Daily Wins
Tour Of World
S. Beach Conger, Jr., of Ann Arbor,
at one time Editorial Director of The
Daily, was recently announced as the
winner of a trip around the world as
assistant to Harry A. Franck, noted
travel author.
Conger was the final selection from
a group of more than 2,000 candi-
dates for the position, which involves
acting as Mr. Franck's assistant and
mechanical aide during the globe-
trotter's next trip around the world.
Mr. Franck, who graduated from
Michigan in 1903, has been engaged
by a travel company to make a trip
around the World, visiting 38 differ-
ent countries, and writing a letter a
week to subscribers in the United
States, who are expected to total
more than 5,000.
Franck, known as the "Prince of
Vagabonds," has spent his life since
he graduated in roaming about the
earth and then coming home and
telling the world about itself. In all,
he has written 23 wide-selling books.
On this trip he expects to sail about
Aug. 30, and be gone until the fol-
lowing June.
Conger majored in political science
while at the University, and as a
senior staff member, and his me-
chanical ability were among factors
in the choice. He is a member of
Zeta Psi fraternity, and was promi-
nent in' campus politics, holding at
present the position of permanent
secretary of his class.
Since his graduation he has been
connected with the Crusaders as
commander of the Ann Arbor Bat-
talion, and as research director of
the Michigan unit.
Late in June he was one of two
temporary choices for the position as
Franck's assistant, and since then
has been in Cleveland and East
Aurora working for the concern.
He is the son of Seymour Beach
Conger, formper chief of the Berlin
Associated Press Bureau, and of Mrs.
Lucille Conger, executive secretary of
the Michigan. Alumnae Council,
Beach, Jr., was born in Berlin, and
received his early education there.
Italy Ready To
Greet Armada,
Now At Lisbon
ROME, Aug. 10.-()-A Roman
triumph, a custom not followed for
many centuries, will be revived Sat-
urday to give ben. Italo Balbo and
members of his trans-Atlantic sea-
plane squadron a rousing welcome
home.
It will have another purpose, too
-to pay tribute to Premier Benito
Mussolini as the inspiration for
Italy's renaissance in aviation. It will
compete in enthusiasm with the re-
ception given the fliers in Chicago,
New York and other places along
their route.
Gen. Balbo advised the Air Min-
w istry today that he' plans to bring
his armada to Ostia, Rome's new
port, from Lisbon, Portugal, 1,300
miles away, without stopping. Their
arrival in Italy is set for Saturday
evening.
Through Arch of Constantine'
Returning from Ostia, the Premier
and Gen. Balbo will be driven
through the central passage of the
Arch of Constantine, just outside the
ancient Coliseum.
A new roadbed has been con-
structed under the Arch, and a rail-
ing around it has been removed. The
1,600-year-old monument, erected

after Constantine's victory over Mex-
entius,- again will become the mo-
mentary center of attention in the
Roman world,
On each side of the arch, addi-
tional arches of triumph will be
formed of hundreds of Fascist ban-
ners in the hands of youthful Fas-
cists.
Heralded By Cannon
The moment Il Duce and Gen.
Balbo pass beneath Constantie's
monument, cannon will boom, the
historic bell in the Campidoglio, the
world's oldest Capitol, will ring, and
tens of thousands of persons will
cheer.
From the arch the automobile pro-
cession will move down the new Em-
pire St., flanking the Roman Forum.
The street will be covered with laurel
leaves.
The mast and flag layout of a full-
dress battleship will be erected in
Empire St. This is permitted only in
the seaports 'of Italy, and it signifies
Rome's return to the sea, which Pre-
mier Mussolini has been advocating
by deepening the Tiber Channel.
FLIERS MOURN COMRADE
LISBON, Aug. 10.-QPR)-Sorrow
over the death of a comrade in the
Azores dimmed for members of Gen.
Balbo's seaplane squadron the happi-
ness they would otherwise have found
in preparations today for completing
their flight to America and back.
Twenty-three planes of the fleet
arrived here yesterday. The twenty-
fourth was damaged in taking off at

THE MICHIaIN AIsLY
| The News Of The World As Illustrated In Associated Press Pictures

Eugene S. Daniell, Jr., Boston
lawyer, is pictured in a New York
court as he was arraigned on
charges of placing tear gas bombs
in the New York stock exchange.
He was indicted for malicious mis-
chief as a felony.

The family of Henry F. Sanborn,
railroad executive who was found
slain and hidden in a shallow grave
on Long Island, believes an at-
tempt to ensnare him in a "gold
brick scheme" preceded his mur-
der.

A tense political situation growing out of the general strike flared into violent rioting in the Cuban
republic. A score were killed and more than 100 injured near the presidential palace (shown above) in
Havana when police fired into crowds celebrating a false report that President Gerard Machado (left)
had resigned. In the face of growing opposition it was predicted that Machado would leave office. Col.
Carlos Mendieta (center) has frequently been mentioned as the opposition candidate for the presidency.
Ambassador Sumner Welles (right) has played a leading role in efforts ,to mediate the republic's politi-
cal difference.
Administration 1
War On Crime

Starving Red
Army Menaces
Chinese Town
SHANGHAI, China, Aug. 10.-k(P)-
A threatened invasion of Amoy by
40,000 hungry Reds who were forced
out of Kiangsi province by the army
of Gen. Chiang Kai-Shek was re-
ported from foreign sources in Amoy
today.
The Communists, were believed
headed for Changchow, 35 miles west
of Amoy, with the purpose of estab-
lishing a sea outlet there in anticipa-
tion of an attack on Amoy.
Reports said the situation in Lung-
yen, was obscure although it was be-
lieved Gen. Tsai Ting-Kai's 19th
route army had fallen back as a re-
sult of its inability to oppose a su-
perior Red force, allowing the in,
vaders to occupy Lungyen and con-
tinue eastward.
A Chinese dispatch by way of
Hong Kong said the 19th army lost
four battalions killed and wounded
and the Communists suffered 5,000
casualties in a heavy battle east of
Lungyen.
Authorities in Fukien province, in
which Amoy is located, sent military
and airplane reinforcements to assist
Gen. Tsai, while the Canton govern-
ment was understood to have sent
more planes to Fukien and dis-
patched troops into southern Kiangsi
province.
Just a few weeks before his 71st
birthday Amos Alonzo Stagg, famous
University of Chicago football coach,
filed the entry for himself and son,
Paul, in the western veterans' father
and son tennis tourney.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
TYPING
TY PIN NG
Seven Cents a Page
PHONE 2-1636
Leave Name and Address
Quick Service
15
REASONABLE RATES-Quick serv-
ice. Phone 2-1988.
WANTED
WILL-Pay cash for used ladies' bi-
cycle. Write Box 5, Michigan Daily.
WANTED TO BUY MEN'S OLD AND
new suits and overcoats. Will pay
3, 4, 5 and 8, 9 dollars. Phone Ann
Arbor, 4306 Chicago Buyer. 34c
PASSENGER-To share expenses to
Missouri. Leaving Aug. 19. Call
Mrs. Boguard, Sociology Office,
Extension 320. 27
LAW STUDENT-Wants ride to Buf-
falo Sept. 1. Share expenses. Phone
2-1988.
FOR SALE
BUICK SEDAN-1926. Good condi-
tion. Call at 412 Camden Ct. or
phone 6553.
GOLFSIDE Riding Academy Coupon
Book. $12 of coupons for $9.60.
Phone 2-2340. 25
FOR RENT
NICE-Single and double rooms for
graduate or employed women. 1328
Washtenaw. 8327. 26
FOR RENT-A 6-room cottage. One
block from campus. Ph. 6444. 20

Gains Headway
WASHINGTON, Aug. 10. -(AP-
Government officials today looked over
the records and concluded that the'
month-old :federal war against the
kidnaper, the gangster andthe rack-
eteer is making satisfactory tprogress.
They promised anew, in the words
of Joseph B. Keenan, assistant attor-
ney general, that,"the inhabitants of
this country are: not to be left to the
mercy of attacks of organized crimi-
nals.
Just a little more than a month
ago, Keenan was designated by his
chief, Attorney General Cummings
to lead the justice department's anti-
crime drive.
President Roosevelt approved. In
fact, the chief executive was so much
interested that he next chose Ray-
mond Moley, assistant secretary of
state, to survey broader aspects of
the problem while Keenan concen-
trated on catching the criminals and
forestalling crimes.
In a report on kidnapings, Keenan
made this summation of cases in the
last month.
Charles F. Urschel, kidnaped at
Oklahoma City July 23. One man
identified and a fugitive, another
held.
"J. J. O'Connell, Jr., was kidnaped
on the seventh of last month at Al-
bany. He is now released and the
federal government, despite certain
handicaps, is attempting to do its full
part in apprehending and bringing to
justice his kidnapers.,
Of the kidnaping of August Luer,
who was taken from his Alton, Ill.,
home at the point of a gun on July
10 and held for ransom, Keenan said:
"Through the efforts of the depart-
ment of justice, through the agents
of the bureau of investigation Mr.
Luer was released from captivity and
returned unharmed to his home
without the payment of any ransom.
"After apprehending the accused
and having collected the necessary
evidence, we hope to participate un-
til the close of the case. The prose-
cution, with the full consent of the
federal government, will take place
in the courts of the state of Illinois
at Madison county.
"Although the federal authorities
could have prosecuted these defend-
ants, since the law of the state of

A series of conferences called by Raymond Moley to seek ways
of unifying federal and state activities opened the government's anti-
crime campaign. Moley (right), appointed by President Roosevelt to
investigate the crime situation, started his new duties by conferring
at the state department with Joseph B. Keenan (left), special assist-
ant to the attorney general in charge of anti-racketeering efforts,
and William Stanley (center), first assistant attorney general.

Warrants for the arrest of Mrs.
Geraldine R. Dutton of, Collins
Center, N. Y., were shorn out after
she had "kidnaped" her three-
year-old son, Richard Allen Dut-
ton (above), from the summer
camp of his father near Oneida
Lake, N. Y. The couple, once
known as the "flying Duttons,"
were separated some time ago.
Illinois provides a death penalty for
kidnaping and with the same deter-
minlation relentlessly to pursue kid-
napers throughout the country, the
combined authorities of the state and
federal government will seek the
maximum penalty of death in each
of these cases.
Keenan said that in 12 recent kid-
naping cases, 19 persons had been
convicted while 14 other suspects are
held and six persons whose identities
are known are being sought.
"If those contemplating the com-
mission of these crimes gave any
consideration to the matter of escap-
ing the clutches of the law after their
commission, they would be very re-
luctant to enter into such enter-
prises," Keenan said..

The slaying of Oliver S. Baily
(above),, 27-year-old Cincinnati
socialite, was believed solved when
District Attorney Aubert Dunn at
Meridian, Miss., said that John J.
H e n g 1 e, 20-year-old Cincinnati
youth, had confessed the killing.
Personnel Cuts
In Washirngton
Go Into Effect
WASHINGTON, Aug. 10.-()-
The President's modified reorgani-
zation plan went into effect today,
involving around 10,000 employes, of
whom about 900 have to look for
other Jobs.
There was, first, the prohibition
bureau, with 1,800 workers. This was
transferred into the justice depart-
ment's new division of investigation.
Six hundred employees, 200 in Wash-
ington, 400 in the field, were stricken
from the payrolls, the rest re-em-
ployed in the new agency.
Next was the merger of the bureau

of investigation and naturalization
in the labor department. All the 3,-
907 employes in these, save 275, were
reappointed temporarily for four
months. The 275 were allowed 10
days notice of retirement or dis-
charge.
The third big transfer found the
heretofore independent United States
shipping board and the Merchant
Fleet corporation put under the com-
merce department. Secretary Roper,
pending a survey, reapopinted all the
924 in these two agencies. He said,
however, that he contemplates a re-
duction later.
Until Sept. 30, all the 2,800 em-
ployes of the abolished office of pub-
lic buildings and public parks of the
national capital will be retained tem-
porarily.
Numerous other smaller agencies
also were merged, or abolished.
Officials estimate the changes will
eventually cut expenditures about
$5,000,000. Additional reorganization
is scheduled for Dec. 31.
Twenty-two Ohio cities will have
teams in the Ohio bantamweight
football league this fall.

FROM SOUP TO MORE SOUP
CHICAGO, Aug. 10. -(A')- As a
taster of soup George Verveka was
busy because that's his business.
A canning company pays him a
salary for tasting soup.
But, his wife, Jeanette, charged
in a bill for divorce, when she set
down a plate of her own soup for
him to eat he looked at it and
shouted:
"What, more soup?"
It was after that, she alleged, that
he picked up the plate and threw
its contents in her face.
The Los Angeles baseball club has
announced that Dean Cromwell,
Southern California track coach, will
be drafted next spring to teach base-
ballers how to run. He will devote
three days a week to the task.

SEA;

td Cool
Lnee8'

CATER
DVIE
ASON

MICH IGAN

Attenc
Mti

= i

To Them -Love Was a Game Without Rules
- Played Anywhere Any Time.

4I

i

LAST TIMES TODAY-

BARBARA
"Bitter Tea

STANWYCK in
Of General Yen"

and

"HER STRANGE
DESIRE"

1

I Loved You Wednesday"
with WARNER BAXTER -ELISSA LANDI

MEW

. ~
-iclj-O '-. With the Musketeers.v
Radio Orchestra
Nightly Except Monday 0
ONANKINAnMILLS
,. On Ann Arbor Trail, 5 miles east of Plymouth between Wayne
and Middle Belt Roads
BEER - DINNERS - OTHER REFRESHMENTS
o > o _a cc oc ccvQ> < > c

Matinees
15c

Evenings
25c

Last
Times
Today

MAJESTIC

Two
First-Rum
Features

t
< ''
"t.
. ',R

i

-----

Starting Saturday!
FAMOUS THATCHER COLT STORY

A DOLPH E
lWNO i t"ig1ht Club Lady"
MENJOU in
With SKEETS GALLAGHER
Also! JESSE CRAWFORD - NEWS - NOVELTIES

"GIRL
MISSING"
with Ben Lyon
Glenna Farrell
Showing Only at
2:00 - 4:20 - 7:10 - 9:40
TOMOR
CONSTANCE BENNETT

"STRANGE
JUSTICE"
Reginald Denny
Marion Marsh
showing only at
3:20 - 8:20

IN

ROW
in "BED OF RO

SES"

-111

Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
THE CURRENT BROADWAY SUCCESS

For Your Vacation RESTFUL BOOKS

Autumn Crocus'

BOSWELL'S LIFE OF JOHNSON
PRITCHARD - THE WORLD'S BEST ESSAYS
EDG. WALLACE - NEW MAMMOTH MYSTERY BOOK
VAN DINE - WORLD'S GREAT DETECTIVE STORIES
BEACH - ALASKAN ADVENTURES
TWELVE FAMOUS PLAYS OF THE RESTORATfN

I

1111 1

1 110

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan