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June 29, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1933-06-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DIAILY-=

T

Educators Plan
Convention At
Chicago Today
Pi Lambda Theta Group
Plan To Confer With
Leading Scientists
Pi Lambda Theta, national hon-
orary education fraternity for wom-
en, will hold its biennial concert
from June 29 to July 2 at the Hotel
Knickerbocker in Chicago, it was an-
nounced yesterday by Miss Gertrude
Layton, president of Xi chapter here.
Miss Layton will attend the meeting
as delegate from the local chapter.
It is expected by national officers
that this annual meeting will draw
the largest number in the history of
the fraternity because of the many
added attraction that Chicago of-
fers this summer, as the World's
Fair.
One of the greatest opportunities
that will be offered, according to
Miss Layton, will be co-operative
meetings with the education section
of the American Association for the
Advancement of Science, which is
also convening in Chicago at this
time. The high point of the con-
vention is expected to be the ban-
quet on Saturday night of the meet-
ings, preceded by initiation cere-
monies conducted by officers of
Lambda chapter of the University of
Chicago.
Dr. Katherine Greene, professor of
education in the University of Michi-
gan and sponsor of the local chapter
of the fraternity, has been nomi-
nateed for national corresponding
secretary.
Grand Rapids
School Girl Is
Found_ Drugged
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., June 28.
-(p)-A 17-year-old Central High
school pupil, Ruth Wellday today
was recovering. from the effects of a
hypodermic injection mysteriously
administered Tuesday night, -render
dring her unconscious for several
hours.
She was discovered Tuesday night
in Barclay Street, a note pinned to
her clothing reading "if a hypoder-
mic doesn't get her this time, it will
get her the next." The needle and
syringe still were fastened to the
arm.
A Grand Rapids police detective
said that an unsigned note had been
found in the wood shed at the girl's
home several days ago. The full text
of the note was not made public, but
it was revealed that a portion of it
invited "the girl who lives here to
meet the writer."
Mr. and Mrs. J. Edward Wellday
told authorities the girl left her
home alone to visit a public library
Tuesday night. The parents de-
scribed Ruth as a retiring girl, fond
of botany, and in the habit of taking
long walks by herself. She was often
alone and read much of the time,
they said.
Talking thickly and apparently
still partlyunder the influence of the
drug, the girl told Detective Harvey
Van Kougher this morning she was
seized as she took a short cut
through the Grand Rapids Junior
College campus. One of the youths,
she said, held her, smothering a
scream by digging his fingers into
her eyes to clamp the palm of his
hand over her mouth. Her eyes were
sore and red, and a previously un-
noticed bruise was discovered under

her chin.
She said the two flung her to the
ground when the radio police cruiser
passed by, and fled.
"I got up feeling dizzy and walked
a little way, but I fell down and I
don't remember anything anymore,"
the girl said. She lapsed into a deep
sleep in the middle of the question-
BUY AMERICAN
AND FROM A
UNIVERSITY STUDENT
SINCLAIR
SERVICE STATION
STATE AND PACKARD

v eteran. Sports A nnouncer Is Recuperating

-Associated Press Photo
Joe Humphries, veteran sports announcer, is shown sunning him-
self in the garden of his home at Fair Haven, N. J., where he is recov-
ering from a recent physical breakdown. A familiar figure at every title
bout for many years, Humphries ilopes to be on hand when Sharkey
defends his title against Primo Carnera in New York today.
- - __n

Speaks Tomorrow

L oan Rate And
Game Preserve
BillsDraw Veto
LANSING, June 28. - (AP) - Gov.
Comstock was prepared today to veto
two measures of wide interest passed
by the legislature. One would cut
the small loan interest rate from
3 1-2 per cent to 1 3-4 per cent a
month. The other would repeal the
private shooting preserve act.
Small loan companies in the state
haveagreed to cut their interest rate
from 3 1-2 per cent to 2 1-2 per cent
a month on loans of $100 or more
and 3 per cent on loans below $100,
the governor said.
It is expected that if a special
session of the legislature is called
early next year the governor will
recommend that the schedule to be
adopted voluntarily by the compan-
ies and be written into the statues.
The governor said he will disap-
prove of the 1 3-4 per, cent bill be-
cause those connected with the small
loan business have informed him
such a rate would drive reputable
concerns out of business and let the
"loan sharks" in.
"I am in favor of reduced small
loan rates, but, I am bitterly op-
posed to loan sharks who operate
under cover and charge all the in-
terest and bonus they can get," the
governor said. "I believe the legis-
lature went too far when it cut the
rate to 1 2-4 per cent."
The so-called small loan bill stir-
red up a torrent of charges during
its legislative career. Senator Ed-

First Education
Conference Led
By Carrothers
Bureau's Head Points To
The Services Rendered
Other Educational Units
(Continued from Page 1)
with the man or woman who can
give the best answer to a particular
question raised is often the best
service that caw be rendered, Dr.
Carrothers claimed
"Throughout the year, by visits
made in high schools and colleges
as well as through community meet-
ings and other gatherings, repre-
sentatives of this bureau come into
contact with large numbers of par-
ents and patrons and thus help to
answer questions," he continued.
"The director of the bureau alone
has given 32 lectures this past year
before teachers' organizations, par-
ent-teacher association meetings,
high school assemblies, community
gatherings, luncheon clubs, etc.
"On many of the trips out over
the State members of the bureau's
staff are asked to meet with various
school officials to give consideration
to some of the local problems and,
on other occasions, teachers and ad-
ministrators come to the office here
for help and advice." Dr. Carroth-
ers concluded.with a short discus-
sion of the effectiveness of the fur-
nishing of articles and books on
problems confronting school men
and gave as hi conception of one of
the most difficult of all problems to
be faced this year the question of
school finances.
"The National Survey of Educa-
tion" will be the subject of the next
of the afternoon conferences to be
held at 4:10 p. m. today in Room
1022 University High School. O. I-
Frederick, teaching assistant in edu-
cation, will deliver the address.
ward B. McKenna, Democrat, De-
troit, charged he was informed by a
small loan company lobbyist he
would "be taken care of for life" if
he would drop his demand for a rate
reduction. A house committee in-
vestigating lobbying questioned sev-
eral witnesses relative to the bill. A
grand jury in Detroit issued a subo-
ena for Constantine Daniels, lobby-
ist, but it was not served as Daniels
left Lansing suddenly and is said
to be outside the state.
T h e private preserve measure
would wipe out the 1929 law giving
owners and members of private pre-
serves an extended season for shoot-
ing pheasants. The governor an-
nounced several days ago he would
not approve the bill.
If you write, we hearsit.
Correspondence Stationey,
Fountaia Pens, Ink, etc.
Typewriters all mwakes.
Greeting Cards for verybod
0. D. MO RRILL
.314 S. State St., Ann A or*

,..v...... ... ....., ,

Blame Nazis
For Bombing
Railway Line
VIENNA, June 28.-(kP)-A bomb
exploded today on the Vienna-Ba-
den suburban electric railway tear-
ing up a stretch of track.
The explosion occurred during the
early hours when no trains were
running. The track was repaired and
the train schedule resumed at the
usual hour.,
(A series of bombings beginning
two weeks ago was attributed by offi-
cials to Austrian Nazis, who subse-
quently were outlawed by govern-
mental decree. Nazi leaders said
they took the edict as a challenge
for further activi-ties.)
The greatest police precautions
were being taken to safeguard
Chancellor Engelbert Dollfuss who
Tuesday will go to Innsburck to ad-
dress a meeting.
All automobiles entering the Tirol,
western Austria were being halted
and searched. Fascist Heimwehr
guards traveled on all trains.
Meanwhile, a Tirojese construc-
tion camp continued to be plundered
for explosives, 45 pounds of which
disappeared from the camp during
the night.
Hans Hueber, a Heimwehr leader
in the Salzburg organization, went
over to the Nazi today. In his re-
signation he said he had accepted
the leadership under the impression
that the purpose of the Heimwehr
was to fight Marxism and not Ger-
many.
I i

All Of Germany Mourns
Versailles Anniversary
BERLIN, June 28.-(P)I-All Ger-
many went into mourning today in
protest against the treaty of Ver-
sailles, signed 14 years ago by rep-
resentatives of the allied powers and
Germany.
The new regime of Chancellor Hit-
ler, which moved closer to completed
domination of the national scene
with the dissolution of the National-
ist party and its affiliates, is respon-
sible for the first observance of the
anniversary. '
Flags were flown at half staff from
churches, public buildings and homes.
Demonstrations were planned all
over the country and the Berlin
Protestant cathedral annnounced a
special prayer service on the theme,
"God liberate us."
All newspapers devoted editorials
to the pact, which provided for
yhanges in Germany's boundaries on
the south, north, and east; for the
ceding of all Germany's oversea
colonies to the principal allied pow-
ors, and for the limiting of Ger-
:many's military, naval, and air for-
,es, among other matters.
Chancellor Hitler's Voelkischer
Beobachter asserted: "We now real-
ze that we were misguided through
President Wilson's 14 points, ex-.
'ended to Germany as a bait for ac-
,epting the terms of this devastat-
ing truce."
Asserting further that the Nazi na-
ional revolution marked the "turn-
ng point of the Versailles era," the
newspaper said final liberation re-
luired new, individual sacrifices.

Prof. Everett S. Brown of the
political science department
yesterday delivered the third
address of the Summer Session
series in Natural Science Audi-
torium. Professor Brown, an
authority on current events,
has represented the Un:versity
for five years in the annual
New York Times contest.
In his talk, "The Political
Parade of 1933," he discussed
the important bills passed dur-
ing the last Lame Duck Con-
gress and the work done in the
spe2ial Congress called by Pres-
ident Roosevelt. He also ex-
plained the method employed
by the President in getting im-
portant bills passed by the
Senate and the House of Rep-
resentatives.

Discusses Political Trend Of Present Year

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
WANTED
WANTED-Passage to Buffalo over
the Fourth, will help pay expenses.
Call Box 77, Michigan Daily.
14
FOR RENT
SPEND-Your summers during the
Summer Session at Whitmore
Lake. Large cool rooms, private
beach, home cooking. 512 S. Shore
Drive. Tel. Whitmore 9170. 5
FOUR-ROOM-Apartment fully fur-
nished. 228 S. Thayer. Opposite
Hill Auditorium. 6
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY - Soft water. 2-1044.
Towels free; socks darned.
13c
WASHING-And ironing wanted.
Guaranteed satisfactory. Call for
and deliver. 611 Hoover. Phone
2-3478. 17c
STUDENT AND FAMILY LAUNDRY
-Good soft water; will call for
and deliver. Telephone 4863 12c
NOTICE
INSTRUCTION -Stenotypy, short-
hand, typewriting, accounting,
Hamilton College, State and Wil-
liams Sts. 12
HOME COOKING-For Jewish boys.
611 Hoover St. Phone 2-3478. 18c
BICYCLES
RENT A BIKE-Russell Reed. Ray-
ment Radio. Next to Witham's,
South University. Phone 2-1335.
MITES DESTROY AGED GIANT
DURBAN, So. Africa, June 28.-(P)
-A giant red milkwood tree, 100
feet high and which was standing
when Vasco da Gama sailed past the
port in 1497, was so ravaged by white
ants that it had to be cut down for
safety.
TYP'E W RI TI NG
MIMEOG.APHINTG
Iiptly 0and. nee t.1y do ini
our o= shop by cometent
D t. MRRI L
14 S. State St,,Am Arbor,

Prof. Laurence M. Gould of the
geology department will speak at 5
p. m. today in Natural Science Audi-
torium on "Geology of Niagara Falls
and Vicinity."
Women Divers Will Hold
Exhibiti'n Class Today
Two drivers from the Illinois Wo-
men's Athletic Club of Chicago-
Ruth Fauntz and Marian Mansfield
will assist in the final classes of the
swimming division of the-sports ses-
sion, women's athletic officials an-
nounced today.
Both of the women hold Central
A.A.U. Championships, and Miss
Fauntz has placed in National com-
petition in both high and low board,
it was stated. At 3 p. m. today Miss
Fauntz and Miss Mansfield will do
demonstration work for the sports
session group at the Intramural pool.
This demonstration will be an open
session and any 'person interested
in diving theory and technique is
invited to attend.

11

STEAM PERMANENTS
and
PERSONALITY HAIRCUTS
Dial 8878
DI MATTIA BEAUTY SHOP
(Over the Parrot)

I

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LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

i

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-Nam& -W
1

-,I1I

SUMMER TERM

STENOTYPY
(Machine-Shorthand)
SHORTHAND
Enroll for a
a Si

TYPEWRITING
ACCOUNTING

Complete Course or
ingle Subject

The Michigan Repertory Player
present
NOEL COWARD'S LAUGH HIT

11

ing and could not be questioned
cerning the notes pinned on
dress.

con-
her

HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
17th Year State and William Streets

11

e1,bHAY

~FE"

I

FINAL PERFORMANCE

Summer School.

Special Summer Prices
75e -- ; 035c

TEXTBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES - LOADS OF SECOND-HAND BOOKS

Schedule of Plays

SEASON
TICKETS

ENOUGH FOR EVERYONE

at

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

June 30, Friday-"The Play's the Thing"
July 1, Saturday-"The Play's the Thing"
July 5-8-"The Romantic Young Lady"
July 12-15-"Uncle Tom's Cabin"
July 19-22-- "The Servant of Two Masters"
July 26-29- "The Circle"
August 2-5-"All's Well That Ends Well"
August 9-12 -"Autumn Crocus"
August 14 and 15 - "Hippolytus"

9 Plays
$3.50 $3.00
$2.75

Operated By
Harold Beam
A Bus. Ad. Student

Phone 6300 For
Reservations

316 State Street

11

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