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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 16, 1932 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1932-07-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the office of the Dean of the Summer Session
until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a. m. Saturday.
VOLUME XI SATURDAY, JULY 16, 1932 NUMBER 17_
Excursion No. 7: The Ford Airport; also a visit to Henry Ford's uni-
e museum of Americana known as Greenfield Village, which includes
imples of American village architecture of 100 years ago, and Thomas
Edison's original Menlo Park laboratory. The party leaves Wednesday
ernoon, July 20, at one o'clock, from in front of Angell Hall. Round
O by, motorbus, $1.00. Reservations must be made before Tuesday, July
5:00 p. m., in room 9 University Hall. The number of students who can
accommodated is limited.
Removal of Incompletes, College of L., S., and A., and School of Music:
rdents now in residence are reminded that any incompletes or absences
in final examinations received in former semesters must be made up
or before the close of the first month of this Summer Session; if not
de up, the grade of "E" will be rec'orded.
Four-week Courses in Physical Education--Women: Women students
3 wish to sign up for the four-week courses in golf, tennis, and swim-
ig should do so this week in office 15, Barbour Gym.
School of Education--August Seniors: All students registered in the
iool of Education (undergraduate) who expect to complete the require-
ats for graduation by the end of the present Summer Session will please
e the tentative list of seniors posted on the bulletin board of the School
Education in Room 1431, University Elementary School. Any person
ecting a degree from this School, whose name does not appear on the
should report at the Recorder's Office immediately.
Elizabeth B. Clark, Recorder
The Public Health Nurses' picnic and swim will be held at Delhi pool,
sday, July 19. We plan to mee in front of Natural Science Building
S:00. Transportation will be furnished. Bring your bathing suit. Miss
lyer, dietician at Jordan Hall, is willing to furnish the food at 40 per
b per person, for those living outside of Jordan. It is necessary to know
ยข-many are going by Saturday morning. Will you please sign up in
) Natural Science or call Miss Wade at Jordan by Sturday morning,
ou can go. ,
Women Students: Women enrolled in the Summer Session who are
sbers of Business and Professional Women's Clubs are invited by the
nbers of the Ann Arbor Business and Professional Women's Club to a
nic at Winan's Lake today. Bridge, swimming, boating, and supper,
rning, to Ann Arbor early in 'the evening. For transportation please
Grace Goodrich, 7611, and make your reservations. Meet at north door
4ichigan League Saturday between 2 and 3 p. m.
The Education Club Garden Party at the Michigan League will be held
:15 Monday,fJuly 18. Dean Wells will speak. All visiting faculty mem-
are asked especially to come. A cordial invitation is extended to all
ents ofh the Summer Session and to wives of men students. The Garden
;y will ,be at 7:15 rather than at 7:30, as formerly announced.
A Musicale will be given at Jordan Hall for the residents and their
ids, on Sunday,, July 17, at 4:30. The program will be given by Lyda
pianist, Louise Florea, and Grace Cushman, violinist.
x
First Methodist Church. Dr. Fisher will preach at 10:45 a. m. Sunday
Civilization and Revolt." This is one of the series of sermons on "Liv-
in the Twentieth Century" which he is preaching during the Summer
ion.
Presbyterian Students: Regular Sunday social hour at 5:30. The
m at 6:30 is to be led by George Crockett. An interesting discussion is
red.
St. Andrew's Church-Sunday Services: 8:00 a. m. The Holy Com-
ion; 9:30 a. m. Summer School of Religion,; 11:00 a. m. Kindergarten;
0 a. m. Morning prayer and sermon by the Reverend Duncan E. Mann.
ses in Religion. 10:00 a. m. Harris Hall, Christian Biography, leader
Ellen Gammack; 8:00 p. m. 725 Oxford Road, Christian Philosophy,
er the Reverend Henry Lewis.
Wesley Hall. Student Guild Sunday 6:30 p. M., Prof. W. C. Rufus will
k upon "Observations of Christians in the Orient and in America."
al hour and refreshments will follow the meeting.
Summer Plays: The final performance of C. K. Munro's, comedy "At
Beam's" will be given in the Lydia Mendelssohn. Theatre tonight at

Robinson Criticizes Ioover
Cabinet Men forNegligence

Hunt for LootM
May Raze Old
Moscow Wall

Danish-Norwegian Harmony
Hits Snag on Greenland Coast

Mills, Hurley, and Hyde
Called '3 Musketeers' of
President

Hoover's 'Musketeer'

Soviet Plans

to Destroy I

WASHINGTON, July. 15.-(AP)-
Secretaries Ogden L. Mills, Patrick
J. Hurley and Arthur M. Hyde were
characterized iri the Senate today
by Senator Joseph T. Robinson,
Democratic leader, as "the Three
Musketeers of the Hoover Adminis-
tration." He charged them with ne-
glecting their official duties to make
partisan political speeches.
Replying to recent speeches by
these Cabinet officers, Robinspn said
they were making every ,possible ef-
fort to discredit the. Democratic
platform and the Democratic can-
didates.
"They scoff at the proposal of the
party for President that the Amer-
ican people be given a new deal,"
he said.
"These three musketeers insist on
playing the game with marked cards.
Plainly there is a widespread de-
mand for a change in the political
policies of our Government.
In Congressional Record
"They go forth by day and night
to partisan meetings of state Re-
publican conventions and deliver
bitter partisan addresses, causing
them to be inserted in the Congresr
sional Record and attempting, while
neglecting their official duties to in-
fluence the judgment of the electors.
"I would think with a 'deficit of
$2,900,000 and a new tax bill to be
administered, that Secretary Mills
would have enough to do to stay at
his post of public duty and discharge
his official responsibilities without
abandoning and neglecting his du-
ties to participate in a partisan. po-
litical campaign.
"Of course, the Department of
Agriculture is just as well off with
its head, Secretary Hyde, absent
from his post as if he were present
in the, capital."
The political flareup was set off
by a request by Senator Hastings
(Rep.), Delaware for unanimous,
consent to print in the Record the
Hurley speech made at Columbus,
0., Thursday night.1
Borah to Object
Senator Borah (Rep.), Idaho, who
recently announced he would not
support the Republican prohibition
plank, opened with a declaration
that he didn't intend to object to1
that request, but that it cost "thou-#
sands of dollars" to print the
speeches put into the Record and he
intended to object to all in the fu-
ture.
Senator Robinson, the Democratic
leader, announced at the start that
as he intended to reply to Hurley's
speech he wouldn't object.
Senator Reed (Rep.), Pennsyl-
vania, with the assertion that a

Chinese

City Enclosure

SEC. ARTHUR M. HYDE
page in the Record costs $58 to print,
suggested that "we make an agree-
ment now that no political speeches
be put into the Record."
He contended "the taxpayers are
entitled to protection against our
using the Congressional Record for
campaign purposes."
Unless something of this sort is
done, he added, "the Congressional
Record will simply bulge with politi-
cal speeches."
Senators Bingham (Rep.), Con-
necticut; Couzens (Rep.), Michigan,
and others joined in the dispute
that followed, but Hurley's speech
was allowed to go into the Record.
Frank L. Smith Named
G. 0. P. Committeeman
CHICAGO, July 15.-(AP)-Frank
L. Smith, Dwight, Ill., . millionaire
who twice was named United States
senator without ever being one, made
a political comeback Thursday when
he defeated Gov. Louis L. Emmerson
for the post of Republican National
committeeman.
Smith's victory, won onthe first
ballot taken by the state central
committee, ended a deadlock that
had existed since the Republican na-
tional convention.
The choice also was a victory for
Former Gov. Len Small.
SWIM at
Newport Beach
Portago Lake

To Locate Treasure
MOSCOW, July 15,-(AP)-In the
belief that treasure may be hidden
in the ancient wall surrounding the
"Chinese City," which, next to the
Kremlin, is the oldest quarter of
Moscow, the Soviet government is
consideringa proposal to tear down
the enclosure.
Legend has it that in earlier days
when Moscow was subjected to fre-
quent attack from invaders, priests
and the wealthier residents of the
quarter buried their money and jew-
els in the', thick, brick wall to save
them. It is thought that many per-
ished before recovering their valu-
ables.
The suggestion that the great
wal, or at least part of it, be de-
stroyed finds support among those
who contend t h a t regardless of
whether it really contains treasure
it should be removed as an impedi-
ment to traffic. The Moscow Soviet,
governing body of the capital, will
decide the matter.
Generally known as the "Chinese
Wall," the approximately 30-foot
high structure was built in 1534 to
fortify that quarter of, the city,
housing the chief businesshcenter,
against attack.
It derived its name from the Rus-
sian Kitai Gorod (Chinese City)
which in turn was believed to have
sprung from the old Tartar word
"kitai" meaning fortress.
Enclosing a semicircular area of
approximately t h r e e kilometers
(about one mile and a half) the wall
has seven gates,surmounted by as
many small towers, which are the
only means of egress and exit to
that . portion of the city, making
traffic routes devious and round,
about.
The old "Chinese City" since the
fourteenth century had been- the
seat of the rich Moscow trading area
and the place of residence of the
wealthier merchants. .

(By The Associated Press)
A strain on the friendship and
arbitration pact which the five Scan-
dinavian. nations, Finland, Iceland,
Sweden, Norway and Denmark, sign-
ed in June, 1930, has developed
through a fresh dispute between
Norway and Denmark over thin
coastal strips under the shadowshof
Greenland's icy mountains.
That pact, reached in connection
with Iceland's celebration of 1,000
years under parliamentary rule,
pledged the cousin nations never to
go to war with each other, but to
submit differences to the court of
International Justice at The Hague.
Each side claims the other has
reopened the question which was
referred in toto to the international
court in July, 1931. At that time
Norway proclaimed sovereignty over
a section of Greenland's east coast
and now she has taken similar ac-
tion on additional territory two,
miles wide .between 60 degrees, 30
minutes, and 60 degrees, 40 minutes,
north.
Norway asserts this is a defen-
sive move because Danish explorers
surveying the region this summer,
had been given police powers which
would put Norwegians under their
jurdisdiction. The Oslo government
therefore has endowed Norwegian

hunters in the region with the pow-
ers of sheriffs.
Norway seemingly is trying to in-
sure for her fishermen and hunters
a permanent base where they can
maintain supply depots and emer-
gency repair facilities. Denmark, re-
lying upon a treaty with Norway in
1924, claims sovereignty over the
whole of its Arctic island colony.
Supper Ride Planned
For Education Women
A supper ride, under the direction
of the department of physical educa-
tion for women, will be held at 5:30
o'clock tomorrow night. From the
fairgrounds, the riders will go to-
wards the river to Delhi where a sup-
per will be served.
Reservations may be made by call-
ing Mullison's at 7418 before noon
tomorrow. Women not having trans-
portation to the fairgrounds will
meet at the front of the Women's
Athletic building at 5:15 o'clock.
These rides have been sponsored
during the last year and have proved
unusually popular. They will be con-
tinued, it was said, during the sum-
mer should there be sufficient de-
mand for them.

I

,; ;;-FF, - ;;'; ;;

i!

-.

BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street
TODAY 11:30 to 1:30
Bacon and Eggs with Toast
Chop Suey with Rice
Waldorf Salad with Cold Pork
Sandwich
Hamburg Steak with Fried Potatoes
and Cucumbers
Jello - Ice Cream - Cake
Coffee - Milk

CAMPUS

CLUB

DANCING

I

34c

Wednesday
Saturday and
Sunday

it

5:30 to 7:30
Soup
Cubed Beef Steaks
Lamb Chops
Stuffed Pork Chops
Veal Cutlets a la Creole
Roast Beef
Mashed or Fried Potatoes
Tomatoes,- Spinach - Cold Slaw
Pie - Cake - lce Cream
Coffee Tea Milk

Dining
Accommodations

11 I

40c

wealthiermerchants.

Best .Floor in Ann Ar
LUNDQUIST-STIPE
CAMPUS CLUB
ORCHESTRA

11

ToMORROw Last Times Today
DOLLAR LEGS", "IS MY FACE
With JACK OAKIE RED"
funniest stars Ricardo Cortez
RelentTwelvetrees
Moday ght Owel Robert Armstrong
rederc MachMI C H IG A N
-IHGN

COO 1-See f or yourself
Couples Only
25c a person
CAMP US CLUB

11

RIDE at
MULLISON
SADDLE STABLES
OUT WEST HURON ST.
PHONE 7418

C anoeing

11

LIMITED
ENGAGEMENTI
POSITIVELY will not be
shown in any other theatre
In this city this season;
WE URGE YOU TO
BUY SEATS NOW
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
has the honor to present the
greatest attraction In
stage or screen history
GRAND
HOTEL WITH
G * GRETA GARBO
* JOHN BARRYMORE
* JOAN CRAWFORD
* WALLACE BEERY
* LIONEL BARRYMORE
LEWIS STONE JEAN HERSHOLT
From the play by Vicki Baum
Directed by'Edmnund Goulding
TODAY AND SATURDAY
2.30 TWICE DAILY 8.30 !
ALL SEATS RESERVED
EVENINGS 50c 75c, 1.00, 1.50
MATINEES 50c, 75c, 1.00
Plus Tax
MAJESTIC

Spend
in one

the day on the beautiful Huron River
of our High Grade Old Town Canoes.

i(
i-
In

GIGANTIC

- --..

rLEARANCE

SALE

-r- --. ,W--

CONIUS!

One More Week of Sensation aues
This sale is well in the lead of every previous savings record.
Both our stores are packed with Bargain tables, and we are sweeping out at
still lower prices an overstock of fiction, non-fiction and reference books.
Remember any book you haven't read is a new book, and you will find hun
dreds of volumes to select from which are remarkable values for your own

9 A.M. till 12 POM for $2.50

I

OVA

Phone 9313

I
I
I

Saunders' Canoe Livery
on the Huron River

or the school library.

Also, a good time to stock the camp or cottage for

U
4%

=> o=>(X (<=> = <=>Xomos <>=> <=: > o o o
MICHIGAN REPERTORY PLAYERS v
present
The Theatre Guild Comedy Success
AT ARS OBEAM'S"
LAST TIME TONIGHT,
T TT fA ltir-W TWB' WW rt ox-&UUAT mT.+, k r-vrb

your vacation for what is a vacation without a good book to read when you
are in the mood.
Stationery Bargains This Week Are Exciting Values. Be Here To See

We sincerely advise your inspection of a sale which offers hosts of,
tunities to actually save dollars.
TODAY AND ALL NEXT WEEK AT BOTH OUR STORES.
Annual Summer Clearance Sale Ends Saturday, July 23rd

oppor-

11

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