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July 15, 1932 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1932-07-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Schools Placingl
More Stress on
Adult Edication
Interest in Co-Ordinating
Education, Home Life
Rising, Dr. Wilker Says
Programs Revised
Sympathetic Approach to
Study of Field Compara-
tively New, She Says
"There seems to be a growing be-
lief that the public school can, by
acquaintance with the subject mat-
ter of parent education, become
more and more 'parent-minded' and
grow in ability to work with parents
in making provisions for the actual
needs of the whole child," said Dr.
Marguerite Wilker yesterday in a
talk on "What Can the Public
School Do In Parent Education?"
"Some public schools stand ready
to adjust their school schedules and
eliminate some academic work in or-
der to free timne for teacher-parent
contacts," she continued.
Variety ofaPrograms
"When we iook around to see what
is being done, we find a wide variety
of programs.' We 'realize that the
term 'parent education' has been
coined within the last ten yearsand
indicates that for the" first time in
history the problems in this field are
being more or less systematically ap-
proached in study.
"School preoccupation with sub-
ject matter has led to an interest in
the academic child who is measured
in terms of reading, writing and ari-
thmetic. Home preoccupation with
care has led to an irerest in a dif-
terent child, eating, dressing, 'rest-
ing, adjut ting to adults and- other
children in many practical and so-
cial situations. Here we have an
academic child on the one hand and
a home child on the other, and no
one actually interested in the whole
child,.
Problem Winning Recognition
"Naturally questions 41ave arisen.
Thinking adults have recognized the
s'chool-child-separated-f r o m-t h e-
home-child situation. Alert teachers
have wondered how their projects.
and units of work elaborately plan-
ned around so-called child interests
actually did meets the real needs of
children who come f r o m homes
properly or improperly fed, rested
or tired, serene or tense because of
home difficulties.
"Many public school workers are
reading more widely the subject
matter of interest to student par-
ents," she concluded. "Some teach-
ers are assisting parents in organ-
izing study groupsand finding reli-
able source material."

Three First Choices for U. S. Olympic Team

,;

Third Session
On Fealth Will,
Be 1eld Today
Dr. Bunting Opens Dis-
cnssions This Morning;
Town to Preside
The third soecial Public Health
institute, sponsohred by the depart-
irment of hygiene and public health,
will be. helk today and tomorrow in
the west amphitheatre of the West
Medical building. The lectures will
be given at 9, 10, 11 2 and 3 o'clock
on both days.
Dr. Russell W. Bunting, of the
dental college, will speak on "Nutri-
tion in Relation to. Dental Caries"
at 9 o'clock today. At 10 o'clock Dr.
Mazyck Ravenel, professor of pre-
ventive medicine At the University
of Missouri and editor-in-chief of
the American Journal of Public
Health, will lecture on "The Future
Development of Public Health
Work." i
'"Medical Aspects of the Depres-
sion" will be the topic of Dr. Charles
L. Brown, of the medical school, at
11 o'clock. Dr. Theophile Raphael,
of the department of mental hy-
giene, will talk on "Mental Hygiene
and Its Public Health Relation" at
2 o'clock; Prof.' Howard B. Lewis,
of thedchemistry department, will
conclude today's program with a
lecture on "Some Recent Develop-
ments in the Field of Nutrition."
Dr. Floyd R. Town, health officer
of Jackson, Mich., will preside at the
meeting. All Summer Session stu-
dents who have their treasurer's re-
ceipt will be admitted free of
charge.e
The midsummer meeting of the
Michigan Public Health association
will be held in conjunction with to-
morrow's session, with a luncheon at
12:15-,o'clock at the Leaguq. Speak-
ers on tomorrow's program are Dr.
Brown, Dr. Ravenel, Dr. Bunting,
Dr. Nathan Sinai and Dr. Clarence
D. Barrett.

Demands an Apology

Gov. Gen. James McNeill (above),
representative of the British crown
in the Irish free state, demanded an
apology from President Eamon De
Valera for "discourtesies" to him
by members of the De Valera gqv-
ernment.

Cream of the nation's athletic crop will appear in the big Palo
Alto carnival, last barrier between the mecca of all track stars-the
Olympics# Percy Beard (top), forteik Alabama Poly star now with the
t New York Athletic club, is the choice in the 110-meter hurdles; Ralph
Metcalfe (bottom) of Marquette university, has rushed up among the
leaders/in the sprints, and Bill Carr of Penn is the "dark horse" entiy
in the'400-meters, by virtue of an upset of the mighty Ben Eastman in
the intercollegiate 440-yards.
Bridge Lessons Add to Interest
In Contract at League's Party

New Trends

By BETTY KANE
As bridge interest has been arous/.
ed by the contract lessons given at
the League each week, plans have
been made for a large number of
people to play cards tomorrow night
at the weekly party fer the Sum-
mier Session students.
Dancing to the music of the U. of
M. Vagabonds will feature the eve-
ning's entertainment. "Pete" Blom-
quist will "strike up the band" at 9
o'clock and dancing will continue
until 11.,
The, League reception committee
will be on hand to performintroduc-
tions, - Miss Katherine Noble' an-
nounced yesterday. Men and women
are cordially invited to attend the
dance whether tor not they have

partners, she said.
Studsents representing countries in
various parts of the world gathered
at -the League yesterday afternoon
for a tea party.
Hosts and hostesses at the Cosmo-
politan club party were Mrs. Cqrlton
Wells; Eric Ellis, Fort Worth, Tex.;
Henrietta Guetschow,. Detroit; Helen
Foley, Detroit; Marvyll Harmon,
Ashland, 0.; Helen Mixon, Louis-
iana; Constance Johnson, Berkeley,
Cal.; Harriet Fitzgerald, Berkeley,
Cal.; H. Y. Hirata, Hawaii; Anthony
Pearson, Greenville, B. C.; Esther
-Hottenstein, Millersburg, Pa.; John
Kalaf, Assyria; Honoko Hoshino,
Japan.
Members of the committee in
charge of the tea were Virginia Mc-

Manus, chairman, Mary Minnick,
Wadad Mackdici, Evelyn Gibson,
Pauline Galletly, and Fumiko Sia-
sho.
The League committee m7embers
were Elsie Hanswald, Jean Cowden,
Frances de Lawder, Bessie Pfohl,
Ruth Pfohl, Katherine Pfohl, and.
Margaret Siewers.
An admission fee of 25 cents will
be charged at the League party to-
morrow night.
Golds dust worth approximately
$100 was scraped from the floors
of the old federal assay office in
Seattle when the staff moved to
new quarters.

In Character
Training Seen
Changing conditions in civiliza-
tion require shifts in the emphasis
in character -education, Dr. Paul
Rankin, supervising director of the
department of research and adjust-
ment in the Detroit school system,
told educators here yesterday after-
noon in a discussion of the funda-
mental concepts on which the .1932
Yearbook of the department of su-
perintendence was based.
While character education 'is a
co-oberative enterprise between the
school, the home and the commu-
nity, the school should be the leader,
Dr. Rankin declared.
The Yearbook recognized that
character education is primarily the
development of attitudes, ideals and
motives, and only secondarily the
development of knowledge and'skills,
Dr. Rankin said. Character is more
than the avoidance of wrong-doing;
it involves an active concern for
social welfare, he declared.
Choice of methods, content, or-
ganization and administration of
character education should be basecd
on findings of research, he said, and
the school should give pupils fre-
quent practice in meeting real prob-
lems in human relations.

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