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August 18, 1932 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1932-08-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Dem ocratic Nominees in Cmnpaign Huddle

Michigan Man
Was Inventor
Of Skyseraper

William LeBarmiu
Designed First
At Chicago

J *3flky
Towver

The world's first skyscraper was
designed by a University of Michigan
professor.
This startling fact was revealed
yesterday by Prof. Emil Lorch, direc-
tor of the College of Architecture af-
ter press dispatches had told of the
"discovery" of the building in Chi-
cago by a committee of architects,
historians, scientists and real estate
dealers. The edifice, known as the
Home Insurance building, Lorch said,
was planned by the late Wlliam Le-
Baron Jenney, who served as profes-
sor of architecture here from 1875
to 1877.
"There has long been a contro-
versy," Lorch said, "as to who inaug-
urated the steel frame or 'skeleton'
construction and thus made possible
the American skyscrapers. A patent
issued to the late L. H. Buffington, a
Minneapolis architect, long seemed to
give him priority; however, the in-
vestigation made in connection with
the demolition (of the Chicago build-
ing) has proven that Jenny designed
that building before Buffington re-
ceived the patent, and he can there-
fore be credited with making a con-
tribution of the greatest importance
in the field of building design."
Professor Jenney, Lorch revealed,
conducted classes here under the first
appropriation made for the teach-
ihg of architecture by Governor Bag-
ley in 1875. Architecture was not
taught again after 1877 until the
present classes were established in
1906. Upon leaving here Jenney went
to Chicago where he established him-
self as one of the leading architects
of his day. His best known living
student is Irving K. Pond, designer
of a number of the campus buildings.
A large cast iron capital from the
Home Insurance building is now on
exhibition in the ground floor corri-
dor of the Architectural building.

(Associated Press Photo)
The Democratic nominees, Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt and his
running mate, Speaker John N. Garner, got together for first time since
their nomination when the Texan visited the New York governor at
his home in Hyde Park, N. Y. From there they proceeded to Albany
and further discussed their plans for the coming campaign.

Th omas, Solist Candidate,
Will Campaign in 40 States

NEW YORK, Aug. 17.-(P)--The
country at large may see little of
Roosevelt and Hoover in the presi-
dential campaign, "but N o r m a n
Thomas plans personal appearances
in 40 states.
Nor does the socialist candidate
for the presidency expect the stren-
uous campaign to be a severe tax on
him physically.
Hardened to Campaigning
"I am pretty well hardened to
campaigning," says Thomas, who
stands 6 feet, 2, weighs 185 pounds
and appears physically fit at 48.
Even when not campaigning for
some office, he averages a couple of
hundred public addresses a year.
In 1931, for example, he filled 193
lecture engagements, not including
the speeches he made as a candidate
for borough president of Manhattan,
and not including his radio talks.
Active in Socialist Work
All the while he is fulfilling his
responsibilities as executive secretary

of the League for Industrial Demo-
cracy, an organization promoting the
socialist doctrines.
Thomas' speaking tour began on
August 13, with an invasion of New
England. He will be making address-
es every day-sometimes four and
five-until November 8, he says.
He once was a Presbyterian minis-
ter. His father was a minister.

MAJESTIC

NOW PLAYING!

WARREN WILLIAMS in
"Beauty and the Boss"
with Marian Marsh and Charles Butterworth
Also News - Comedy - Novelty

_

PA

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J I

,h for

Your

Second-hand Books
at-

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' S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

College-trained engineers
revisit the athletic field

III

N more than a hundred
floodlighted fields, foot-
ball is being played
and practiced in the evening
hours, before larger audiences
than ever before-with fewer
injuries and in better conformity
with classroom duties.
This constructive revolution in
athletics is largely the work ofN
college-trained engineers - w
young men personally familiar with the
needs of college and school. They are
dedicating the technical experience
gained in the General Electric Test' De-
partment to the practical service of under-
graduate athletics--designing and instal-
ling floodlighting equipment for virtually
every sport-football, baseball, hockey,
tennis, and track.

Night photograph of Temple Stadium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvaoa,
floodlighted with G-E projectors
Slighting and Floodlighting projects, or in
the electrical equipment of industries and
mines or of immense power stations; some
are designing and applying electric

apparatus to propel

ocean liners and

locomotives. All are engaged in the
planning, production, or distribution of
G-E products and so are performing a
work of national betterment and creat-

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