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July 23, 1931 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-23

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_ s., HE SUMMER MIOHIGAN DAILY

D aily Of f ic ial Bulletin
Publication in the Bulletin Is constructive notice to all members
of the University. Copy received at the office of the Dean of the
Summer Session until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

J
i

VOLUME XI

THURSDAY, JULY 23, 1931

NUMBER 20'

,i

Excursion No. 7: General Motors Proving Ground will be visited
Saturday morning, July 25. The extensive road and laboratory facilities
of the General Motors Corporation will be inspected under the guidance
of plant engineers. The party leaves in special busses from in front of
Angell Hall at 8 a.m. Round Trip, $1.00. Tickets must be secured inr
room 9, University Hall, before Friday, July 24, 5 p~m.F s
Carlton F. Wells
Graduate Conferences in Education: At the Thursday morning
conference (10-12 a.m.) at the Michigan Union; of which C. L. Anspach,
Head of the Department of Education, Michigan State Normal College,
is chairman; Professor George C. Kyte will discuss "Progressive Prac-k
tices in Elementary Supervision" and Professor F. W. Hubbard will speak
on "Progressive Practices in Elementary School Principalship.";
There will be a noon luncheon at 12:15 at the Michigan Union at
which Dr. Edward H. Kraus, Dean of the Summer Session, will act as
chairman.k
At the Thursday afternoon conference (2-4 p.m. at the Michigant
Union) Professor C. O. Davis will discuss "Progressive Practices in the
Preparation of Teachers" and Dean J. B. Edmonson will speak. Dr. B.-
F. Pittenger, Dean of the School of Education, University of Texas, will
act as chairman of the conference. '
Graduate School: Students enrolled in the Graduate School will
not be permitted to drop courses after Saturday, July 25. A course is,
not officially dropped until it is reported in the office of the Graduate,
School, 1014 Angell hall.
Students who have changed their elections since submitting elec-
tion cards should call this week at the office of the Graduate School,
1J14 Angell hall. This involves the dropping and adding of courses,
the substitution of one course for another, as well as the change of in-
structors. G. Carl Huber, Dean
School of Education: Permission to drop courses without "E" grades
will not be given after July 25. No course is considered officially drop-
ped unless it has been reported in the Recorder's Office of the School
of Education, Room 1431, University Elementary School.
Elizabeth R. Clark, Recorder
Physiological Chemistry 120--The first lecture of this course will
be given on Fri:day, July 24, at 7:00 a.m. in the West Amphitheatre,
West Med'cal Building. H. B. Lewis
Pniversity Women: There will be a swimming patty for women on
Friday, July 24th at one of the nearby lakes. The fee will be fifty
cenits and tickets should be purchased from the Physical Education of-
fice in Barbour Gymnasium before Friday noon.
The group will leave Barbour Gymnasium at five o'clock. All women
students are cordially invited.
Chorus: An informal "sing" for those interested in High School
Chorus and Glee Club materials is held at Morris Hall each Thursday
evening from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. All interested are cordially invited.
David Mattern.

Many Kansas Counties Declare
Holiday on Levies to
Help Farmers.
TOPEKA, Kan., ;July 22.-(A)-
Many Kansas counties have de-
clared a moratorium on taxes in
an effort to assist farmers of the
country's chief wheat-producing
state who are offered the lowest
prices in history in a year which
brought their largest crop.
A survey reveals officials of at
least 17 counties out of 105 in the
state postponed for periods rang-
ing up to one month the date fixed
by law for payment of semi-annual
tax installments without penalty.
Under the statute, a 5 per cent
penalty must be added for second-
half installments of annual tax as-
sessments unpaid on June 20 of the
succeeding year. Under a strict in-
terpretation, however, the penalty
need not be charged against the
delinquent taxpayers until July 1.
Walter Pleasant, chairman of
the tax commission, and Roland
Boynton, attorney general, assert-
ring there was no legal authority
for extension of the deadline, have
i efused to give their sanction to
the procedure.
OKLAHOMA CITY, July 22.-(UP)
-Oklahoma state is going to be a
lenient landlord to 2,120 farmers
Jiving on public school land.
Gov. W. H. Murray, who himself
was once a farmer, has set aside
-a state statute by executive order

and declared a moratorium on the
payment of 1930-1931 rentals on
340,000 acres of farm land owned
by the state until Feb. 1, 1932. '
The order was issued after 60
farmers from Kay, Noble, Garfield
and Grant counties appeared be-
fore the governor and other mem-
bers of the state school land com-"
mission Tuesday and asked for
leniency.
Arctic Crew Makes
Test Flight on Graf
FRIEDRICHSHAFEN, Germany,
July 22.-(/P)-Forty-six men who
will go into the Arctic on the Graf
Zeppelin's cruise starting next Fri-
day were in the big ship today dur-
ing a three-hour test flight over
Lake Constance.
They wore the heavy ciothing
they will need in the North and the
scientists who are participating re-
hearsed the roles they will play,
releasing automatic registration
balloons which rise to great heights
and contact with a radio station
specially built on an Alpine peak
near Bregenz.
When the Graf returned one of
the scientists said a test balloon
got up to 32,000 feet and its signals
could be heard at the radio station
long after the airship had returned
to its hangar.

Justice Department C oi 1e ct
Facts Before Petitioning
Hoover's Clemency.

s

PARDON FORFAIL
TO BE CONSIDERlED

i
t
{

THURSDAY, JULY 2B, 1931
cuted and sentenced the former
secretary of the interior as to what
if any, clemency should be shown.
Mitchell also said the rule gen-
erally compelling a prisoner to
serve a third of his sentence before
his petition would be considered
need not necessarily apply to Fal
Fall- Tuesday became prisoner
6991 in the New Mexico state peni-
tentiary. Under his conviction in
connection with the naval oil re-
serve leases, he was sentenced to
a year and a day in prison and
fined $100,000.

WASHINGTON, July 22.-(AP)-
Although Albert B. Fall has made
ono personal application to Presi-
dent Hoover for clemency, an ex-
ception has been made of the for-
mer cabinet member's case and the
justice department has undertaken
a study of it.
The exception was made from a
presidential ruling that petitions
for pardons must be signed by the
applicants before they are to be
considered. However, the justice
department began collecting facts
upon which a recommendation for
or against clemency might be made
on the basis of petitions from Sena-
tors Cutting and Bratton of New
Mexico and that state's legislative
branches. These petitions were
sent to the White House and re-
ferred to the justice department.
Only the routine investigation
would be made, Attorney General
Mitchell said Tuesday, adding that
efforts we: e being made to obtain
opinions from the men who prose-

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Phi Lambda Theta initiation will
be held at the Chapel of the Mich-
igan League at 7:30 this evening.
There will be a table reserved in the
League Cafeteria for members of
Phi Delta Kappa. Esther L Belcher
Presbyterian Students: A picnic
supper for Presbyterian students
will be held this evening at 8 o'-
clock at the student center, 1432'
Washtenaw avenue.
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-
A frank "Guide to C(Xrse; anc
Teachers" was published recently by
the Daily Cardinal, student news-
paper.

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