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July 22, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-22

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7VEDNES 7AY; JULY' 22 ,1:931

TSE SUMMER MIC BIGAN DAILY..

F. Q'

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 1931 THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY PAOU TE1~kE

NEW SIGNIFICANCE
ADDED TO PARENT
TIO
Professor Greene Says Project
Is No Longer Confined to
Women's Clubs.
CITES THREE PURPOSES
Trow Addresses Conference on
Progressive Practices in
Character Education.'
"Parent education at this time is
no longer thought of as a privately
owned series of women's clubs,"
said Prof. Katherine B. Greene, of
the School of Education, in an ad-
dress yesterday before the second
day's educational conference for
graduates. "It is taking on the
significance of a scientifically or-
ganized movement connected with
our public institutions to give them
fuller opportunity for service," she
continued.
"There are three main purposes
to be carried out by our new con-
ception- of parent education: child
protection and development, adult
education, and public interrelations
with our schools. With these three
p u r p o s e s interlocking in our
schemes, it is no longer possible to
be content with private groups
cemented under social pleasure,"
she went on.
In the second talk of the morn-
ing conference Prof. Marguerite
Walker spoke on "'Progressive
Practices in Nursery Schools."
"Physicians, psychologists, edu-
cators and other specialists have
come to believe that many physical
ills and behaviour difficulties can
be prevented through a wider de-
velopment of nursery schools for
the very young child," she said.
Professor Walker then went on
to tell of the nursery school opened
here recently in connection with
the University Elementary school.'
"Opportunity is made," she said,
"in these schools for experiences
through which the young child may
develop desirable physical, mental,
emotional, and social growth.
"There is no patent medicine to
remove the halitosis of our political
and social life," said Prf. Clarence'
Trow, in the third talk of the Tues-'
day conferences, on "Progressive'
Practices in Character Education."
"The problems of character edu-.
cation are the problems of educa-
tion in general and they must be
approached through the method of
science," he said. Professor Trow
pointed out that we must make a
careful observation of phenomena
under controlled conditions and
conduct a clinical case study- of
problems requiring special study
and treatment.
Sports Wom an
The second open field hockey
game will be held at 7:15 o'clock
tonight on Palmer field. All those
wishing to play must be on the field
dressed for the game at that time.
Refreshments will be served after
the game.

CARTTER' S
*GRIDDL 0
o CAK~I6 AND a
R rrR, K
0 L
E r
A
T ___
LUNCHEON 35c
DINNER 45c

Performs in Circus

Students, Faculty Must Enroll
Tonight for Lessons, Dean
M'Cormick Announces.
Final opportunity is offered to-
night to any faculty member or
student for enrollment in the social
dancing classes held from 7:30 to
8:30 o'clock every Monday and
Wednesday night in Barbour gym-
nasium.
This is the last series of lessons
to be given during the Summer Ses-
sion so those wishing to attend the
classes should come tonight, Ethel
McCormick, dean of women, said.
Beginners classes are on the second
froor of the gymnasium and ad-
vanced students go to the main
floor of the building. Orchestra
music is provided during the hour
of dancing.

SO C IET Y
Mosher-Jordan halls will hold
their first social event of the sum-
mer session on Friday when an in-
formal dancing and bridge party
will be sponsored at the Women's
Athletic building. Enid Bush, social
chairman of the dormitory, is gen-
eral chairman, and will be assisted
by Alice McCully and Miriam Cort-
right. Evelyn Swarthout has charge
of the music; Dorotha Jackson,
bridge, Mirian Annutta, refresh-
ments; Dorothy Peterson, decora-
tions; and Jennie Pietraszac, flow-
ers. Kenneth Lundquist's orchestra
will furnish music for dancing
from nine-thirty until twelve-thir-
ty. The affair will be informal. '
There will be a tea and dancing.
at Mosher-Jordan halls again
Thursday afternoon from 4:30 un-
til 5:30 o'clock. Music will be fur-
nished by Arthur Trusdell.
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY
-The student body here has insti-
tuted a campaign to secure 2,000
books for the university library. s

Chinese Authorities Charge F. F.
Tucker With Fatal Shooting
of HospitalEmploye.
SHANGHAI, July 21.-(P)-Dr.
Francis F. Tucker, treasurer .of
William S. Porter Memorial hospi-
tal operated at Technow, Shang-
tung province, by the American
board of missions, was held at Tsin-
anfu today on a charge of slaying
a native.
Chinese authorities, who took Dr.
Tucker to Tsinafu from Technow,
refused to hand him over to the
American consul. The arrest re-
sulted from the fatal shooting last
week by Dr. Tucker of a Chinese
hospital employe. Dr. Tucker said
he fired at the man in the belief
he was a burglar.
The Kuomintang in the Techow
district immediately demanded ex-
ecution of Dr. Tucker, and suspen-
sion of the activities of the mission.

Reade Will Address
Michigan Socialists
Harold O. Reade, a member of
the League for Industrial Democ-
racy labor chataqua, will discuss the
coal industry at a meeting of the
Michigan Socialist club at 8 o'clock
tonight in the Union.
During tours through West Vir-
ginia, he has recently been in close
contact with social conditions in
the bituminous coal districts. He
is a graduate of the University of
Wisconsin and is now studying ec-
onomics at Northwestern univer-
sity.
Reade worked for a year in north-
ern Rhodesia, making maps for the
Anglo-American Mining company.
RAGGEDY ANN
BEAUTY SHOP
Shampoo . . . . . 50c
Soft Water
Marcel ...... .75c
OPEN EVENINGS
Dial 7561 1115 South University

1

I,

"Poodles" Hanneford,
"The prince of riding clowns,"
will be one of the featured per-
formers with the Hagenbeck-Wal-
lace circus, to appear here Aug. 3.
Hanneford's specialty is known as
"the greatest of all riding acts,"
according to circus officials.
Soldiers, Police Patrol Strike
District; Shoot to Kill,'
Is Command.
SEVILLE, Spain, July 21.-(/P)-
Seville bristled today with police
and soldiers who had orders to
shoot to kill if there was any re-
currence of syndicalist strike dis-
orders. Dispatches from Utrera,
Alcala, Guadaira and other nearby
towns indicated the strike was
spreading.
The Seville jail is crowded with
prisoners arrested at disorders.
There were numerous outbursts of
gunfire during the night but no
one was reported hurt. The uneasy
citizens retired early for the most
part, and bolted their doors.

Haven of
Values for

/' '
,rr
I

BAGA IN
DAY

hI

DRESSES
Sleeveless and with jackets. In
water crepes, one and two piece
cotton and wool mesh. White
and pastel shades.
$4.95
DRESSES
Sport and dressy types. In wash
crepes, shantungs, flat crepes.
White and pastel shades. Also
many dark colors, suitable for
Fall. Good range of sizes.
$9.95

Ann Arbor
Shoppers
on Bargain Day

Collections for this Great Bargain Day Sale include the very
finest apparel. Considering the seasonableness of the
clothing offered, Bargain Day at Jacobson's is one of the
greatest price-slashing events in our history. It promises to
surpass former sales in style, quality and diversity of selec-
tion.

Final Reductions
IN
FOR
Bargain Day
~9Blondes

One Lot of
DRESSES
2 for $5.00

1.

sg .

White Kids
Linens
Suva Cloths
and others.
AAA to C

1

I

For immediate clearance we
have drastically reduced every
summer material in stock. Values
to $7 will be found at this $3.79
price. See them today!
ALL SUNNIE SANDALS ... $1.79
ALL SPORT OXFORDS ....$.3.79
ALL WOVEN SANDALS. . . . $2.79
(All Sales Final)
Jacobson's

75 Pairs
Kid Gloves
Values to $4.95-Now
95c
Bathing Suits
Bradley and Sacony suits in one
and two pieces. $5.95 and $8.95
values.
$3.95 and $6.95
Wool Suits

GROUP No. 1
This group includes sport and dress Frocks. Ma-
terials are crepes, prints and chiffons. Values up to
$25.00. Now $12.75.
GROUP No. 2
The second group includes printed and plain chif-
fons, crepes, and some new summer frocks. Former
values up to $29.75. For Bargain Day only $16.75.
GROUP No. 3
This price gives no indication of the style and actual
value of these dresses. Dresses for miss and matron.
Suitable for all occasions. Values formerly $39.75
to $55. Now $19.75.

$
$
$

.75
.75

9.75

i

COATS

$29.75 Values at .... .
$39.75 Values at.
$49.75 Values at .

$12.75
$15.75
$15.75

GROUP No. 1
Exceptional values in street, sport and dressy types.
Wide range of sizes and colors. $19.75 to $25.00
values. $9.95.

I.

Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices
FREEMAN'S

25 Dresses
at
$1.00 each
BLOUSES
One lot of crepe and
blouses will go at
~Price

GROUP No. 2
This group includes chonga, soft wools and tweeds
in black, navys and mixtures. Values from $29.75
to $35.00. For Bargain Day $14.75.

$

.75

satin

DINING ROOM

Lunches 40c, Dinners 60c
Sunday Dinner 75c

SWEATERS
One lot. Good assortment of
size and shades. Values up to
$5.95.
$1.95

SILK COATS
Group of navy and black
silk coats including half
sizes. Values $25.00 and
$29.75.
$10.95 and $12.75

DRESS COATS
One lot of higher priced
models in dress coats,
specially priced for this
big event.

WHITE AND
PASTEL COATS
This lot of white and
p a s t e l coats, formerly
valued from $12.75 to
$29.75 will go at
$7.75-$14.75

ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM HILL AUDITORIUM

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