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July 16, 1931 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-16

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TSE SUMMER MiCffiGAN DAILY

THTJrRSDAY_ JTJI Y' 16_ i931

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY T14TTThQflAV .TTIT.V lA 10~1
ow,

r

Dall y Off'icial Bulletin
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
of the University. Copy received at the office of the Dean of the
Bummer Session until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

VOLUME XI

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 1931

NUMBER 15'

Excursion No. 5: A day in Detroit, including an automobile tour
of downtown Detroit and around Belle Isle, and visits to the Detroit
News, radio broadcasting station WJR in the tower of the new Fisher
Building, the Detroit Institute of Arts, and the Detroit Public Library.
Luncheon at the Fisher Building cafeteria. The trip is especially de-
signed for students new to Detroit who desire acquaintance with repre-
sentative commercial and cultural institutions of that city.
Total expenses including luncheon, about $2.00. Round trip bus
tickets must be secured in Room 9, University Hall, before Friday, July
17, 5 p.m. The number in the party will be limited.
Carlton F. Wells
Observatory Nights: Tickets for Visitor's Nights at the Observa-
tory July 20, 21, 22, may be obtained in the office of the Summer Ses-
sion. These tickets are intended for students of the Summer Session
who will present their Treasurer's receipts when applying for them.
There are not many tickets left. Edward H. Kraus
University Bureau of Appointments and Occupational Information:C
The Bureau has notices from the United States Civil Service Commis-
sion for the following positions:
Associate Home Economist (Food Purchasing) $3,200 to $3,800 a year.
Associate Home Economist (Family Budgets) $3,200 to $3,800 a year.
Assistant Home Economist (Standards of Living) $2,600 to $3,200 a
year.
Anyone interested may call at the office, 201 Mason Hall, for further
information.
Students, Colleges of Engineering and Architecture: July 18 is the
final day for dropping a course without record. A course may be dropped
only with the permission of the classifier after conference with the in-
structor in the course. Only in special cases, for good and valid reasons,
will permission to drop a course be given after this time.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary
University Women: There is an excellent library in the Women's
League Building open to you every day at the hours stated below.
Volunteers are needed to assist with evening work. Undergraduates
will receive activity points. If interested telephone office of the Dean
of Women.
The hours are 1 to 5:30 daily except Sunday. Sunday, 3 to 5:30 p.m.
Evenings, 7 to 10, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday.
Dean of Women
School of Education: August Seniors-all students registered in the
School of Education who expect to complete the requirements for grad-
uation by the end of the present Summer Session will please note the
tentative list posted on the Bulletin Board of the School of Education
in Room 1431, University Elementary School. Any person expecting a
degree from the School of Education, whose name does not appear on
this list, should report at the Recorder's office immediately.
Elizabeth B. Clark, Recorder

Williams Sends 191 Specimens;
Swainson's Hawk, Unusual
Variety, Included.
One hundred ninety-one new
bird specimens have been received'
by the bird division of the Museum
of Zoology, directed by N. A. Wood,
who for thirty-six years has been as-
sociated with the University Mu-
seums.
The birds come from Henry Wil-
liams, of North Dakota, whose
home is situated in the migration
route used when the birds fly to
different climates in the fall and
,spring. He usually sends two ship-
ments a year, and the present
group has been collected since last
fall, Wood said.
There are several rare specimens.
One of special interest is Swain-
son's hawk, named after a famous
naturalist. Only four of these birds
have ever been captured in Michi-
gan. In 1880, Wood took the first
one ever caught in northern Mich-
igan. Last year he again secured
one, the last to be taken in the
state.
Williams sent a series of geese
which include the snow goose,
Canadian goose, and the blue
goose, named for its slaty blue
color. Among the ducks are the
wild mallards from which many of
our tame mallards are descended.
There is Holboel's grebe, which has
beautiful silver plumage and lives
on fish. The ruddy duck exists in
Michigan but is not common here.
The golden plover is very rare in
the east, and Harlan's hawks are
never found in this state. The Bo-
hemian waxwing is very common in
the west but is hardly ever seen in
Michigan.
be a swimming party beginning at
5 o'clock tomorrow afternoon at a
nearby lake. Sign up at Barbour
Gymnasium by tomorrow morning.
Transportation provided.

University of Texas Educator
Is Favorably Impressed
by His Classes.
"The caliber of the students in
my classes here has impressed me
very favorably," said Pre. Ben-
jamin F. Pittenger, dean of the
School of Education at the Uni-
versity of Texas, in an interview
yesterday. "I think it reflects the
high professional standards of
Michigan teachers," he stated.
Professor Pittenger obtained his
bachelor of arts degree at Ypsilanti
Students Entertained
at League Tea Dance
Many faculty and students were
the guests of the League at a tea
dance from 4 to 5:30 o'clock yester-
day in the Grand Rapids room and
concourse of the building. Mrs.'
John R. Effinger and Mrs. Edward
H. Kraus poured.
The women in charge, who also
acted as hostesses, were Ethel Mc
Cormick, dean of women, Katherine
Noble, social director of League
activities, Katherine O'Hearn, pres-
ident of the League, and Janice,

State Normal college. Receiving a
fellowship in psychology, he went
to the University of Texas and
studied for a master of arts degree
under the supervision of Prof.
Clarence S. Yoakum, now vice pres-
ident of the University, who was
teaching there. In 1916, after two
years of work, he received a doctor
of philosophy degree from the Uni-
versity of Chicago.
He taught in summer and regular'
sessions at the Universities of
Washington, Illinois, Minnesota,
and Texas and thinks that "the
,Michigan School of Education com-
pares very favorably" with other
Aschools he has visited.
During the regular session, the
University of Texas has more than
1,700 students enrolled in the
School of Education. Professor
Pittenger said it was difficult to
compare the two schools, but that
ichigan had "much better equip-
ment."
"'In Texas we are forced to rely
on the public schols for our labora-
tories, whereas here you have the
University High School, Elementary
school and the School of Education

PIT TENGER SEES MICHIGAN TEACHING
STANDARDS REFLECTED IN STUDENTS

Wheat Growers Request 30-Day
Relief From Payments
as Prices Fall.
KANSAS CITY, July 15-(A')-
Wheat farmers of the southwest
have turned to their bankers, im-
plement companies and merchants
for relief from debts which are
forcing some to market grain at
prices ranging as low as 25 cents
a bushel at country shipping
points.
Seeking a moratorium on debts
that will permit them to hold their
product for a month or more, far-
mers have carried their plea not
to the government, but to the in-
fluential men of their own com-
munities.
TYPEWRITING
and
MIMEOGRAPHING
A speciality for twenty
years.
Prompt service . . . Experienced oper-
ators . . . Moderate rates.
O. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615

A

Fillette,
League.

social chairman of the proper all in the same bulding,"
jhe said.

BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street
TODAY, 11:30 to 1:30
VEAL CROQUETTES WITH
CREAMED POTATOES
CARROTS AND PEAS OR
POTATO SALAD, COLD MEATS
BANANA CUSTARD
COFFEE, MILK
35c
5:30 to 7:30
LIVER AND BACON, FRIED
ONIONS
MEAT LOAF, CHILI SAUCE
SIRLOIN STEAK, A LA CREOLE
BEEF ROAST
PORK ROAST
MASHED ORSCALLOPED
POTATOES
SLICED CUCUMBER OR
LIMA BEANS
35c

JA

Enjoy A Splendid
Luncheon or Dinner

QUIETLY SERVED

f

1

Geology 31s: Excursion to Yp-
silanti and Rawsonville on Satur-
day, July 18th, by motorbus, leav-
ing east entrance of Natural
Science Building at 9 o'clock, re-
turning 12 a.m. Bring Ann Arbor
map by the U. S. Geological Sur-
vey, for sale at book stores for 10
cents.
W. H. Hobbs
The Men's and Women's Edu-
cational Clubs are sponsoring a
fun-fest and dance in the gym-
nasium of the University High
School on Friday evening of this
week from 8 to 12 p.m. All people
interested in Education are cor-
dially invited. Come and bring
your friends.
Pi Lambda Theta members will
hold a picnic at the home of Mrs.
K. B. Greene, Thursday, July 16th,
at 6 p'm. Transportation will be
provided. All wishing to attend
meet at the University Elementary
School at 5:45.
Esther L. Belcher
Men and Women are invited
to tea at Mosher Hall from 4 to 5:30
this afternoon.
Social Director of the
Summer Session
Women Students: There will
I CARTTER'S I

in the
MAIN DINING ROOM
MICHIGAN
LEAGUE
Luncheons 75c
Dinners $1.00
Phone 23251

BOOK BARGAINS5oC
Our Bargain Tables of
TEXT and REFERENCE BOOKS

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THE TITLE IS A
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Alexander Woolcott in the
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