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July 11, 1931 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-11

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T$E SUMMER, MIC BI4AN DAILY

SA7:'IIRLIAY. ' 7LY 1I. 1$3 .-

-- - -MMER -KOMGN DAIY VATiRflAYJ.y TJY i iy1

JtLi!! _uAts _..-.
ul-shed ever mor except Monday
durin the University Sumer Session by the
8oard in Control o0 Student Pubhlieations.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of al news dia-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this papr and the local news published
herein. ,A11 rights.o! republication o! special
dispatchee hereit are also reserved. -
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post.
offeice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.60; by mail.
/1.7b.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
An Arbor,. Michigan.
Tolophense: Editorial, 4925; Business
24214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGiNG EDtITOR
HAROtD O. WARREN, JR.
Editorial Director...........Gurney Williams
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
C. W!. Carpenter Carl. Meloy
L. R. Chubb Sher M. Quraishi
Blarbara .bal Eleanor Rairdon
Charles C. Irwin Edgar Ra"ino
Susan Manchester Marion Thornton
P. Cutler Showers
BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
Assistant Business Manager .. Vernon Bishop
Contracts Manager. ........Carl Marty
Asistants
Unrbett Franklin Ralph Hardy
SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1931

i

no stock, it is said, will actually be
sold until the sale of every share
is assured. The Daily does not pro-
pose to push any stock scheme,
however sound, but it does feel that
a worthy enterprise should at least
be called to the attention of the
community.
--- --- -....
)What Others Say
"PSEUDO-ED UCA TION"
(Judge Magazine)
Summer school is here. Loudly
sing cuckoo. And cuckoo to you,
sir! Half a million students milling
about for six weeks in a thousand
colleges, schools, institutes, tutor-
ing camps and student tours. An
orgy of pseudo-education.
Walter Greenleaf has remarked
that the disease of our summer
schools is "credititis." Get a nice
little credit toward your A.B. or your
A.M. by gulping down a pre-digest-
ed course. Take three "hours'' in
this and two "hours" in that and a
few minutes of something else, keep
careful count and stick to it and
some fine day you'll belong to the
fellowship of educated men. And
if you're a teacher, you may get
your pay raised.
Summer school is all to the good
as a holiday, a junket, a change of
scene, and adventure in acquaint-
anceship, a brushing up of old
knowledge or an impetus toward the
quest for new. But we ought to
let it go at that. The tremendous
development of summer schools in
recent years has brought to a new
point of absurdity the whole Ameri-
can scheme of measuring learning
by a calculation of credits, marks,
tests and degrees. It's a bookkeep-
er's idea of education, not a schol-
ar's and its slogan is "get by."
Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to be brief,
confining themselves to less than 800
words if possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of commnunicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily.

Ii .f 1

About Books*

DEPRESSION AND
EDUCA TION

For the first time in the history o:
the educational institutions of the
State the public schools of Michi-
gan are facing the next school year
with reduced appropriations. There
has been a nationwide demand far
reduced taxes and the clamor in
Michigan has been insistent. The
educational institutions of the State
are to feel the cut with the othe:
departments of local government,
the authorities have decided.
We would like to raise the ques-
tton as to whether or not the re-
duction of teaching facilities is a
false economy. Does not the re-
placing of experienced teachers b
inexperienced and perhaps poorly
qualified teachers at lower salaries
mean a loss of teaching efhiciency
in our public schools that cannot
be compensated for by saving the
difference in pay? Does education
of the future citizens of Michigan
fall under the head of such ex
penses that should be slashed in
times of depression? We would
like to know whether the cutting
of these costs will seriously impai
the teaching efficiency of our pub
lic educational system?
We are inclined to believe that n
temporary emergency should per-
suade the authorities into crippling
no matter for how short a period
11:e machinery of education in th
.state.
If, and only if, cutting of cost
is compatable with the mainten-
ance of teaching efficiency in pub-
lie schools such cost reduction
would prove a boon to the state if
it is reflected in lowered taxes;
otherwise it will prove an unkincd
cut with a double-edged sword.
.The importance of public educa-
!ion can not be over-emphasized
n a democracy provided, of course
the subject matter of the education
itself be calculated and designedi
to build the ideal "good life" for
which even democracy has been ac-
epted by the political and social
philosophers of America as the most
efficient and available means. From
this view point citizenQ of a de-
mocracy may never consider it un-
timnely to discuss the relations of
public education to the state. Par-
ticularly in a period of stress and fi-
nancial crisis like the present may
the true value that citizens place
upon their educational institutions
be measured.

r
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t,
a

' '
Fiction
THE COMING FORTH BY DAY
OF OSIRIS JONES. By Conrad Al-
ken. Charles Scribner's Sons. Part
poetry an: part prose. Not pre-
cisely a novel.
THE COLONEL'S DAUGHTER.
By Richard Aldington. Doubleday,
Doran & Co. Not a war story. The
heroine is the daughter of a re-
tired colonel living in a small vil-
lage.
THE FLOWER OF LIFE. By
Thomas Burke. Little Brown &
Co. The story of a woman's life
told as she is entering the work-
house.
THE OTHER ONE. By Colette.
Cosmopolitan Book Corporation. A
novel from the French.
BROOME STAGES. By Clemence
Dane. Doubleday, Doran & Co. The
story of a self-sufficient family.
1919. By John Dos Passos. Har-
per & Brothers. A novel set in Pa-
ris, by the author of "Manhattan
Madness."
A ROSE FOR EMILY AND OTH-
ER STORIES. By William Faulk-
ner. Jonathan Cape & Harrison
Smith. A volume of short stories.
HESTER CRADDOCK. By Alyse
Gregory. Longmans, Green & C.
A tragedy of the Dorset Downs.
THE CHAMPION FROM ' FAR
AWAY. By Ben Hecht. Covivi,
Freide. A collection of short stor-
ies.
THE HARBOURMASTER. By
William McFee. Doubleday, Doran
& Co. A romance of the Carib-
bean by the author of "Casuals of
the Sea."
THE PAST RECAPTURED. By
Marcel Proust. Albert & Charles
Boni. The seventh and final part
of "Remembrances of Things Past."
THE WET PARADE. By Upton
Sinclair. Farrar & Reinhart. A
novel about prohibition.
Biography.
EDMUND BURKE: A BIOGRA-
PHY. By the Rev. Robert H. Mur-
ray. Oxford University Press. The
life of a great statesman and ora-
tor .
JOHN CALVIN: THE MAN AND
HIS ETHICS. By Georgia Hark-
ness. Henry Holt & Son. A study
of Calvin from source material now
for the first time made available in
English.
MR. GLADSTONE. By Walter P.
Hall. W. W. Norton & Co. A bi-
ography of the great Victorian
statesman.
THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF
EDMUND GOSSE. By the Hon.
Evan Charters, K. C. Harper &
Brothers. The biography of an em-
inent critic.
PAVLOVA. By Walford Ryden.
Little, Brown & Co. The bio-
graphy of a dancer by her rehear-
sal pianist and musical director.
A SEASON IN HELL: THE LIFE
OF ARTHUR RIMBAUS. By Jean
Marie Curre. Macaulay Company.
The biography of a poet who re-
nounced his art. Included in the
volume is a translation of Rim-
baud's spiritual autoDiography.
SCHUMANN: A LIFE OF SUF-
FERING. By Victor Basch. Al-
fred A. Knopf. An intimate bio-
graphy.
SHELLY: AN INTERPRETATIVE
BIOGRAPHY. By Norman Hap-
good. W. W. Norton & Co. A life
of a poet.
----
Music & Drama
- I

lI

- To The Editor:
n I have been much interested in
d your editorials on street traffic anc
I feel sure that The Daily is to be
r commended for its efforts to im-
- prove conditions where there seems
to be an opportunity for improve-
ment. ,
o However, in suggesting the erec-
- tion of a traffic signal at the inter-
g section of South and East Univer-
, sity Avenues, I fear that you are,
e perhaps, guided by a faith in thc
ability of these devices to reduce
s accidents which, unfortunately, does
- not seem to be justified by exper-
- fence when they are used at light-
Z traffic intersections.
In 1929, Mr. C. G. Reen, a gradu-
ate student, made a very thorough
L analysis of the 1200 intersection
accidents which had been reported
to the Police Department during
the preceding two years, and he
, found little evidence that the ma-
jority of traffic signals in Ann Ar-
bor served any useful purpose.
The intersections at State and
Packard and at State and Huron
are the only ones concerning which
accident records before and after
the installation of the signals are
available. In one case there was
no change in the number of acci-
dents, and in the other case the
'daccidentsmaterially increased after
the signal was put in.
For several years I have made
every effort to collect data as to
the effect of traffic signals at the
light-traffic intersections. In al-
most all such cases the signals have
been erected on the basis of blind
faith and hope only, and after
their erection practically no one has
considered it worth while to find
out what benefits, if any, were ob-
tained for the expense, delay, and
annoyance they caused. However,
what little evidence there is seems
to indicate that these benefits are
nil, or negative, unless the traffic
volume through the intersection is
at least 500 to 1000 vehicles per
hour. Very few intersections in
AnnArbor carry as much traffic as
that, and at those few it is only at
the busiest time of day.
Roger L. Morrison,
Professor of Highway
Engineering.
(Professor Morrison's statistical
data may refute our statement
concerning a traffic light at the in-
tersections under discussion but we
believe that accidents cannot be;
prevented by scientifically ignor-
ing the causes, and we shall contin-
ue to believe that some definite'
steps should be taken to remove+
the possibilities of further accidents
at South and East University Ave-l
nues, over which there is now no
control whatever. The Editor.)

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCHi
Cor. S. State and B. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"PERSONS THAT MAKE ERAS"
Dr. Fisher
12:00 N.-Sunday School Class at
Wesley Hall. Leader: Mr. Ralph
R. Johnson.
6:00 P. M.-Devotional Meeting.
Wesley Hall. Students from As-
bury and Taylor Colleges will
speak.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister

r=

t.

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rectos
Reverend Duncan B. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Brotherhood of St.
Andrew's Bible class, leader Har.
ley Kline.
11:00 A. M.-Summer Kindergarten.
Miss Eunice Campbell.
11:00 A. M.-Morning Prayer. Ser-
mon by the Rev. A. J. Wilder of
the clergy staff of the Washington
Cathedral.

,

Tuesday afternoon open house
Harris Hall from four to six.

at

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "Sacrament."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow.
ing the morning service.

i

I!

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CliURi I
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
9:30 A. M.-Church School, Sum-
mer Session.
10:45 A. M.-Hear Dr. Anderson
on "Walls and Windows."
6:00 P. M.-Young People's Social
Hour and Supper at Student Cen-
ter, 1432 Washtenaw Avenue.
7:00 P. M.-Union Out-door Serv-
ice for all summer students and
other young people in the grove
at Student Center, 1432 Wash-
tenaw Avenue. Dean G. Carl
Huber will give the address. Stu-
dent Choir of St. Andrew's Church
will lead the music.
TiE
FIRST BAPTIST 'HURCH
B. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Student.
9:30 A. M.-The Church School.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Mr. Sayles will preach on
"FAITH AND DISCOVERY"
12 Noon-Dr. O. S. Duffendach of
the physics dept. of the University
will speak on "The Faith of a
Physicist."
7:00 P. M.-Union student gather-
ing at Presbyterian Church House
1432 Washtenaw. Dean G. Carl
Huber, speaker.
Welcome to all.

a
r

WAYSIDE TAVERN

The proposed Wayside Tavern is
a project worthy of the greatest
amount of support locally. It has
been our opinion for a long time
that Ann Arbor's inadequate hotel
facilities constitute a civic black
eye that needs treatment; now that
a suitable cure has been sugested,
it remains to be seen whether the
company formed to carry out the
prescription will be backed by in-
dividual support.
A modern hotel, advantageously
located, is of no little concern to
the University. On various occa-
sionsth roughout the year there is
an influx of campus visitors that
overtaxes. the comnparatively limited
facilities of the Union and the Lea-
gue, and the question of transient
housing often becomes acute. Con-
sidering the potential patronage
from this source alone the success
of the new hotel would seem to be
assured, even though the income
would naturally be sporadic.
The present plan for raising the
necessary funds to construct the.
Wayside Tavern appears to Ann
Arbor citizens to afford unusually7
-~s~s ~ .. ....L 44. *..w 4v .4 +.1

BRAHMS: Sonata in G ma-
jor, Op. '78: played by Toscha
Seidel and Arthur Loesser for
Columbia Masterworks Set No.
155.
All three of the Brahms Violin-
Piano Sonatas are now available in
Columbia's library, the first and
second being by Toscha Seidel and
Arthur Loesser and the third by
Efrem Zimbalist and Harry Kauff-
man. Brahms is an extremely cau-
tious worker in this very difficult
combination. He is known to have
destroyed at least four Sonatas pre-
vious to the publication of this one,
which stands as his first.Brahms
is more considerate, say than Bee-
thoven, of the special effects the
violin and piano together are cap-
able of. There is on in his writing
.ustification for choosing this coin-
hination. He never resorts to the
.=mple alternation of melodic state-
ment. His most characteristic pro-
cedure is to let diffuse figuration
in the piano quietly penetrate the
texture, deepening a steady, dcvel-
oping thematic 'ine in the violin.
This is especially the ease witl. the
t raajor Sonata which contains a
predorainance of cantabile, always
lead by the violin. Toecha Seidel
and Arthur Loesser play very pleas-
antly and very effectively.

10:45 A. M.-Service of worship.
with sermon by Mr. Heaps. Third
address in the series on "Four
Gospels for Today." Subject, "The
Gospel of Social Justice" with par-
ticular reference to the teachings
of Walter Rauschenbusch.
Soloist, Thelma Lewis.
Organist, Prof. Earl V. Moore.

Sunday, July 12, 1931

7:30 P. M.-Wednesday
testimonial meeting.

Evening

The Reading Room, 10 and 1 t
State Savings Bank Building, is open
daily from 12 to S o'clock, except
Sundays and legal holidays.

I'

'S

1

Outdoor Union Church

Service

Tonight

at Seven

o'clock

Frofessor Carl G. Huber, dean of the Graduate School
will speak on
"TH OUG H TS ON RELIG ION"
at the .
Presbyterian Church House on Washtenaw
Next Sunday, Professor Edw. R. Adair will speak on
tReligion and Reality."

N

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