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July 08, 1931 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1931-07-08

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.
THE SUMMER MICI YGAN DAIL3 '

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 1931

Published every morning esept Monday
ring the University Summer session by the
ard in Control o Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
the use for republication of all news dis-
tehes credited to it or not otherwise credited
this paper and, the local news published
rein. All rights of republication of special
spatches herein are also reserved.
Entered at the Arnn Arbor, Michigan, post.
dice as second lass matter.

o

Subscription by carrier, $1.50; by mail,
$1.75.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Telphonas: Editerial, 4925; Business
21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD O. WARREN, JR.
Editorial Director...........Gurney Wiliams
City Editor..... ........Powers..Moualton
News Editor...........Denton u nze
Music, Drama, Books W....William J. Gorman
Women's Editor .. ......Eleanor Rairdon
Sports Editor..........E A. Beukema
Telegraph Editor .... .........L. R. Chubb
NIght Editors

Denton Kunze
John Bunting
Helen R. Oasrrn
C. W. Carpenta
Edgar. Eckert
Barbara Hall
Edgar Hornik

Powers Moulton

Gurney Williams
AssIstant.
Charles C. Irwin
an Susan Manchester
pr Carl Meloy
_ Shier M. Quraisbi
Edgar iacine
Theodore Rose
P. Cutler Showers

BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
Assistant Business Manager .. Vernon Bishop
Circulation & Accounts Manager .. Ann Verner'
Contracts ..Manager. .. .......Carl Marty
Advertising Manager , .......... Beach Conger
Assistants _

Corbett Franklin
Don Lyon

Ralph Hardy

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 1931
Night Editor-DENTON KUNZE

TRAFFIC NOTES
Last week in this column The
Daily made a suggestion that the
police department tighten up on its
enforcement of minor traffic reg-
ulations, especially with regard to
Stop signs. Space did not permit
a full treatment of the subject but
is one that warants careful consid-
eration from police and public alike.
In Detroit a Stop sign brings a
motorist to a full stop, i.e., the
wheels of his car cease to revolve.
Stop signs in Ann Arbor mean
merely slow down, or caution. The
margin of safety involved between
slow down and stop is less insig-
nificant than most persons believe.
but the Detroit police appreciate it
and their unremitting campaign
against motorists who slide by stop
signs is worthy of emulation. While
it is true that the traffic situation
here is less acute than in a larger
city, it is also true that the number
of pedestrians, particularly around
the University district, is compara-
tively larger. More rigid enforce-
ment of traffic rules near the cam-
pus would certainly be appreciated.
Three other observations along
these lines are respectfully pre-
sented for police consideration.
The first is that if Stop signs are
to be made one hundred per cent
effective they should be of the re-
flecting type in order that they
may be seen by night drivers.
The second suggestion is that the
amber light, in lights already erect-
ted, should be left lighted at night
so that motorists unfamiliar with
dangerous intersections may be
warned of them. The reason for
the shutting down of traffic lights
at night is a logical one: it gives
motorists a break against hold-up
men who might lie in wait at
light-controlled intersections; but
motorists approaching an amber
light could slow down and sound
their horns sufficiently to enhance
factors of safety without seriously
increasing the chances of a hold-
up.

Editorial Comment
"CANNED" PROFESSORS
(The Daily Iowan)
It won't be long now, prophesies
Dr. Frank L. Wright, dean of Wash-
ington university's school of educa-
tion, until students are taught by
"canned" professors, in other words,
talking pictures.
What a boon that would be to
the "10 o'clock scholar" who will
no longer have to slink into his
seat with a guilty conscience at be-
ing late. The drowsy student who
only had three or four hours sleep
before his 8 o'clock will never again
suffer pangs of remorse at awaken-
ing from a deep sleep to find class
dismissed and the screen darkened.
Students who take keen delight
in preying on the professors' good
nature will no longer be the secret
envy and object of open scorn of
his classmates, for who can hope
to nod agreeably at a phonograph
record and a silver sheet and there-
by win an increase in grade?
On the other hand, how deplor-
ably dull would be a class in which
a professor who could neither an-
swer questions that his lectures
stimulated nor counsel the prob-
lems of his disciples, held sway?
That intimate personal contact be-
tween teacher and pupil, so condu-
cive to mental broadening and re-
trospect, would be a thing of the
past. And along with it, would be
mourned by all, those inimitable
mannerisms and eccentricities that
are life long reminiscences of radi-
ating professorial personalities.
Although it must be admitted
that talking pictures have wonder-
ful possibilities in the field of edu-
cation, provide an interesting meth-
d of project teaching, and are val-
uable supplements to vocationa
training, they can hardly become
a cut and dried substitute for hu-
man beings who make their classes
never to be forgotten milestones in
gaining an education.
UNIVERSITY DISORDE RS
(New York Times)
- Student riots in German and
* Austrian universities seem to be
taking on epidemic form. They ar
the reflex of unhappy economic
conditions as translated into politi
cal terms by Nationalist and Com-
, munist agitators. In both countie
the moderate parties draw thei
chief support from the older classes
They have held to their principle
at the cost of seeing the young men
and women run after the preach
ers of Fascist or proletarian vio
lence. The universities are tradi-
tionally the home of insurgency
explainable in part by sheer high
spirits. Since the Armistice, how
ever, discontent among the aca
demic youth has been fed by specia
circumstances. The -student body
used to be recruited in overwhelm
ing numbers from the middle
classes, and the economic status o
these classes has suffered greatly
from the war and its consequences
The impoverishment of the German
burgher class by the collapse o
the currency after 1922 is a socia
fact of the first importance. The
sons of formerly prosperous fami
lies have had to make their way
through the universities of Berlin
and Munich by extraordinary sac-
rifices on their own part and tha
of their families. And upon com-
pletion of their studies they have

found the field of opportunity sad-
ly narrowed since pre-war times.
It is a state of affairs which
makes susceptible youth peculiarly
open to Fascist denunciations of the
present Republican regime. From
the other quarter come Communis
incitements against an economic
system based on class exploitation
and bearing fruit in the progressive
impoverishment of the masses. In
both countries, and for that matter
in many other parts of Central and
Eastern Europe, it is a triangular
battle, Fascists and Communists
being arrayed against the moderate
elements but also against each
other. A special effect of the last
two years of economic depression
over and above the decline in ma-
terial well-being, has been the in-
crease of attendance at the univer-
sities. Students have chosen, have
indeed been urged, to continue their
studies rather than go out into the
world to swell the ranks of the un-
employed. This would mean that
the universities of Central Europe
today shelter a larger discontented
element than usual, with resources
of leisure on their hands for mis-
chief..
If there's any back-slapping go-
ing on in the White House, now
that the moratorium is assured, we
hope President Hoover hasn't been
nut canning minsa shirt.

AED LL
FILBERT'S
HANDY
GUIDE
Each year The Summer Daily has
intended to supply visiting students
with a handy guide for Ann Arbor
and environs, but one thing has led
to another and the proposed guide
book has never been published.
One year the office burned down
before we could get the thing to
press, and the following year found
us all involved in an epidemic of
mumps, etc., so altogether one
thing has led to another, and we've
virtually come to blows.
But this year things look pretty
auspicious in spite of the depres-
sion and the hot weather and we
intend to publish the handy guide
if we have to go down and stand
over the linotyper with a club.
x r *
FILBERTS HANDY GUIDE TO
ANN ARBOR AND ENVIRONS
Preface: On behalf of the Univer-
sity of Michigan-the (insert num-
ber here) Summer Session we wish
to welcome each and every one of
you to America's seat of learning,
culture, refinement and recreatin-
al facilities such as you have never
before had an opportunity to take
advantage of. Enrollment figures
today have reached a new high
- peak and we are gratified with the
response shown. If you contrive to
learn anything, then we shall not
have failed in our purpose. If you
are pleased, tell your friends; if
-not, keep quiet about it.
Dean Glutz.
S* * *
_ Introduction: There are many in-
_ interesting things to be seen in Ann
- Arbor, if you have time.
* * *
l Acknowledgements: Thanks are
due to the Royal typewriter com-
- pay for manufacturing such splen-
s did machines (this one runs like
n a breeze).
. * *
Page one: Points of interest: An-
gell hall, the main building of the
literary college, is several yards long
d
e
c/
s
r
. ,
s
n-
- Point of Interest.
,
h and four stories high. It may be
- reached by taking a 14th Streelt
- car, transferring at Michigan Ave-
l nue and riding out to the sticks
y where you spend the night and get-
- well-nigh chewed up by mosquitoes
e 2. The Natural Science building is
f located on campus near the Chem-
y istry building and is fully equipped
. 3. The Chemistry building is located
n near the Natural Science building
f and is fully equipped. 4. Saunders
1 Canoe Livery is located away the
e hell and gone across the river but
- it's worth a trip some afternoon
Y when you feel like (continued on
1 page 2) paddling lazily up the coo
- Huron. 5. The famous Broken
t Drinking Fountain is situated on
- the State. Street end of the diag-
e onal. A drink from this fountain
- so the story goes, will so rust the

vital organs that rasping squeaks
1 of victims can be heard clear up by
Y the University hospital, 6. Which is
e located so far away from campus
1 that only men like Byrd - and Sir
t Hubert Wilkins have ever seen it
c 7. No Ann Arbor visitors should
1 fail to visit the West Medicine
e building where they teach journal-
ism, the Pharmacy building where
r they teach psychology, and the Ec-
I onomics building where they teach
r sociology. 8.The Intramural build-
s ing is worth a visit, if you have a
e car or a motorcycle, and the Yost
z Field house (almost adjacent to Si-
t beria) (continued on page 3) is
, is a very nice building. 9. Avoid
- the Lawyer's quadrangle which is
-equipped with built-in lawn sprink-
- lers that buzz and fizz if you as
e much as put a foot on one of the
pavement fiaggings. 10. Go down
to Monroe and State Streets and
watch the building operation if you
must but don't say we didn't warn
you that you'd probably have your
head bashed in by a steam shovel.
* * *
*Watch out for the next absorbing
booklet entitled The Summer Stu-
dent Directory. The boys have
been slaving over it for two weeks
now, spelling names wrong, getting
addresses mixed up, and cramming
it full of surprises that will surely
afford you much entertainment.
FILBERT:

Moliere -- always the intensely
practical man of the theatre-has-
tened to fill the sudden gap in his
company's appearances created by
the suppression of "'Tartuffe" and-
the lack of success of the "Princess
d'Elide" with an adaptation of the
old Spanish story then popular in
Paris in several versions and since
then the focus for such talents as
Richardson, Shadwell, deLaclos,
deMusset, Baudelaire, Mozart, and
deRegnier.
There are traces in the drama of
the conditions which governed its
creation. It is probably the loosest
of the better plays of Moliere: loose
in plot construction and in the de-
velopment of the principal char-
acter.
Two great French critics-both
probably somewhat over-eagerly
protective of Moliere's fame-have
suggested ingenious rationales for
the play's extraordinary incoher-
ence. Jules LeMaitre first notes
the apparently haphazard way in
which Moliere reveals Do Juan:
one virtue in this scene, a couple
of vices in the next, a few more
vices in the next scene, then a vir-
tue in the next, etc: a sort of ab-
surd incremental revelation in
t which none of the virtues and
vices are in any significant way
related. But Lemaitre thinks that
there are characteristics which per-
sist throughout these revelations of
Don Juan's pride, courtesy, wicked-
- ness, impiety, perversity, generos-
ity, hypocrisy etc. He says that all
Don Juan's attitudes are "attitudes
of ironic curiosity," that Don Juan
is always "amusing himself," that
he is perhaps above all an art-
ist in the superficial sense, an in-
genious dilletante with an elabor-
ate taste for evil. Lemaitre thinks
that these qualities persist through
- all his attitudes and establish the
a unity of Don Juan's character; and
clearly, it is a penetrating theory.
Emile Faguet, however, thinks that
Moliere, without making it very ex-
plicit, actually was treating Don
Juan at widely different periods in
his life; that years have passed
from the first act (where Dn Juan
is very grandly haughty) to the sec-
ond act (where Don Juan is in his
ancillary period, seducing simple
peasants with promises of mar-
riage). Faguet'stheory sees in-
genious rather than penetrating.
At any rate, the necessity for the-
ories of this sort indicates the dif-
ficulty of the play. Indeed, Le-
maitre himself says: "This fantas-
tic tragi-comedy is an incredible
t mixture of all the genres; it is a
strange hybrid, devilishly ob-
s scure" This suggestion of the play's
- obscurity raises another very im-
. portant problem. Lytton Strachey
s has stated the problem well: "In
_ this extraordinary play-of all Mol-
. iere's works the farthest removed
3 from the clasical ideal-the con-
- ventional rules of religion and mor-
s ality are exposed to a withering
scorn; Don Juan, the very embodi-
t ment of the arrogance of intellect,
1 and his servant Sganarelle, the fu-
tile and superstitious supporter of
l decency and law, come before us as
1 the only alternatives for our choice;
1 the antithesis is never resolved;
. and, though in the end the cynic is
, destroyed by a coup de theatre, the
, fool in all his foolishness still con-
fronts us when the curtain falls."
Y Proving that even the French them-
s selves are not fully satisfied as to
s Moliere's exact intentions in the
play is the evidence of Theodore
. de Banvilles and Paul Souday's be-
I lief that Moliere was in sympathy
with Don Juan. I quote from Sou-

day: "Moliere with unbelievable au-
dacity for his epoch and with a pro-
_ fundity which all epochs can ad-
mire, has made his Don Juan an
_ admirably intrepid representative of
free thought." Souday further adds
the ingenious interpretation that
_ the last view of Sganarelle, the
pious man, crying for his wages
ironically mitigates the fact of Don
Juan's punishment. Of course, this
interpretation of Moliere as a lib-
eral is quite at odds with the con-
ventional view of Moliere as the
apotheosis of cautious common
sense.
These critical paradoxes (and
there are many others) emphasize
the difficulties facing Mr. Stevens
in directing the production of "Don
Juan" which opens tonight at the
Mendelssohn Theatre and runs un-
til Saturday night. "Don Juan,"
I understand, is one of Mr. Stev-
en's . favorite productions and it
should be of great interest to all
those interested in Moliere-which,
I take it, should mean all those
really interested in drama and the
theatre. W.J.G.

Music ? Drama
"DON JUAN"
A Pre-view

i
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y
t
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Summer
Student
Directory

Coming Soon

BRIGHT SPOT
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TODAY, 11:30 to 1:30
POTATO SALAD WITH
COLD MEATS
HOT BEEF SANDWICH WITH
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MEAT LOAF, TOMATO SAUCE
LAMB CHOPS, MINT JELLY
BEEF ROAST, MUSHROOM
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MASHED OR AU GRATIN
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CORN
35c
Mrichigan
LAST SHOWINGS
TODAY
Enemy"
JEAN HARLOW
JAMES CAGNEY
Also Bobby Jones Golf Lesson
TOMORROW
"
in the hidarious and subtle
farce
CHILD"
--Coming Sunday --

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OTHER SPLENDID SHORT
SUBJECTS
SATURDAY
Dick Barthelmess

Norma Shearer
"A FREE SOUL"

"Finger Points"

ii

PLAN TO

B

lY

l

The .Summer
itudent

The third suggestion is that a
traffic light be installed at the in-
tersection of South and East Uni-
versity Avenues. During the past
year or two, numerous accidents
have occurred at this point, and
suitable protection is no longer a
matter of prevention against con-
jectured mishaps. If, as it has been
said, the traffic division budget will
not permit additional equipment at
this time, the above suggestions
should be pondered and acted upon
at some date in the near future.
Perhaps the light at Church and
South University could be moved
down to the next corner. It is of
virtually no use in its present :lo-
cation.
The Daily, in making these sug-
gestions, is not instituting a cam-
paign of civic reform. The local
police are basically efficient and
worthy of commendation on many
counts. The Daily feels, however,
that many profitable suggestions
for improvement in every line of
business have originated from lay-
men whose observations have been
welcomed - a n d advantageously:
nuard

DIRECTORY

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