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July 02, 1931 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1931-07-02

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TWO

THE SUMMER BUC211GAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 1931

TWO THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, JULY 2, 1931

Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session by the
Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news disn-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.50; by mail,
$1.75.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Telephones: Editorial, 4925; Business
2-1214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD O. WARREN, JR.
Editorial Director .......... Gurney Williams
City Editor.... . .........Powers Moulton
News Editor ..........Denton Kunze
Musie, Drama, Books .... William 3. Gorman
Women's Editor ..........Eleanor Rairdon
Sports Editor........... H. Beukema
Telegraph Editor............. L. R. Chubb
Night Editors

, ., I

Denton Kunze
John Bunting
Helen R. farm
C. W. Carpentei
Edgar Eckert
Barbara Hall
Edgar Hornik
Charles C. Irw

Powers Moulton
Gurney Williams
Assistants
Susan Manchester
In Carl Meloy
er Alfred Newman
Sher M. Quraishi
Edgar Racine
Theodore Rose
in Brackley Shaw
P. Cutler Showers

BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
Assistant Business Manager .. Vernon Bishop
Circulation & Accounts Manager .. Ann Verner
Contracts Manager...Carl Marty
Advertising Manager.. . .. ..Beach Conger
Assistants

Corbett Franklin
Don, Lyon

Ralph Hardy

THURSDAY, JULY 2, 1931
Night Editor-DENTON KUNZE

WORLD BEATERS

A few hours ago Wiley Post and
Harold Gatty landed safely at
Roosevelt Field, New York, after a
daring and iecord-breaking flight
around the world.
If their venture does not open
up new commercial possibilities or
prove scientific theories, it does not
matter: the only aspect of the flight
that interests most persons is that
two men have successfully culmin-
ated a dangerous and thrilling
flight around a world that is
daily becoming more homogeneous
through just such means as time-
destroying flights and personal con-
tacts.
In the swift parade of the day's
events, let us give them full credit.
COMPULSORY LEARNING
The present economic situation is
clearly reflected in the altered per-
sonnel of this summer's student
body. Even a casual glance indi-
cates that the average age of this
year's student is lower; on the
whole the more recent graduates
predominate. Significantly, too,
yesterday's registration total set a
new record for the University Ses-
sion.
Even a superficial analysis offers
an explanation for the increase,
omitting any references to the im-
proved facilities of the University.
Graduates unable to find positions
have returned to take advantage of
the opportunity to further their
knowledge, realizing that by doing
so they will lose nothing and have
everything to gain. Some of them,
having spent a fruitless year in
search of employment, have wisely
chosen to take refuge in school un-
til the depression storm blows
over. Very few will miss the chance
business opportunities that arise
from time to time, and all of them
will find themselves better qualified
to enter the vocational field when
their added training period is over.
It is one of the few beneficial
changes wrought by semi-chaotic
circumstances: that today's student
is forced to extend his period of
learning and development.

Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to be brief,
confining themselves to less than 800
words f possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regarded rs confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily.
(Editor's note: This is the sec-
ond and concluding half of Profes-
sor Pawlowski-s communication re-
garding Professor Pollock's Uni-
versity lecture, "The Sore Spot of
Europe-The Polish Corridor," giv-
en Monday in Natural Science aud-
itorium).
For racial or ethnographic con-
sideration I can refer Professor Pol-
lock'' to Putzger's Historical Atlas,
a standard German text book (pub-
lished by Velhagen and Klasing,
Leipzig) used in practically all Ger-
man schools and colleges. There
the maps show that Poles and Sla-
vonic peoples have occupied not
only the "Corridor" of today but
also vast territories to the west of
the river Oder, and that Eastern
Prussia was always a German en-
clave separated in the West from
the remaining provinces by Polish
territory. Throughout centuries this
enclave was a fief of Poland.
It is worth while knowing that
under German rule in all the 15
elections to the Imperial Reichstag,
between 1871 and 1918, the "Corri-
dor" province returned only Polish
deputies. Not once was a German
elected.
Furthermore, Professor Pollock
failed to mention, in connection
with the touching story about the
occasional cow passing a border
line, that most frequently it is a
cow belonging to a Polish farmer,
since the majority of the popula-
tion of Eastern Prussia still is Po-
lish.
Regarding the question of trans-
port between East Prussia and the
Reich, I could refer Professor Pol-
lock to the exact Reports of the
German Ministry of Foreign Af-
fairs and the Administration of
German railroads in Koenigsberg,
stating officially that Poland is go-
ing beyond the stipulations of the
Treaty of Versailles, assuring tran-
sit and expressing satisfaction at
the working of the transit arrange-
ments.
Finally, regarding legal consider-
ations and provisions of the Cov-
enant of the League of Nations for
occasional revisions and readjust-
ments of the ,stipulations of the
Treaty of Versailles, it should be
borne in mind that five years after
the ratification of the Versailles
Treaty Germany of her own accord
signed the Locarno Agreements
(December 1925) which include the
arbitrationConvention with Po-
land. In addition to this (over a
period of eight years) Germany.
signed and ratified no less than 144
different agreements and conven-
tions with Poland.
Books of a reconciliatory charac-
ter are now written and published
by Germans counteracting the jin-
goist propaganda and appealing to
the good judgment of the German
people. The former president of
Danzig Senate was not promoted to
the mayorship of Berlin, he was
kicked out by the Danzigers who
were sick and tired of Hitlerites
and other jingoists invading Danzig
and stirring up trouble with Po-
land.
From all this everybody can read-
ily observe that the two great

neighboring peoples are trying to
work out peacefully their common
destinies.
Still in 1919, Erzberger wrote:
"Even to a blind man, Germany's
future lies in Russia." But Poland
stands in the way. "Crush Poland,"
say jingoists. But it cannot be
done. They have tried it for a
thousand years and have failed.
It was the continuous sabotage
of Polish goods passing through
Danzig that forced the Poles to
build the Gdynia Harbor.
The Polish "Corridor" is not a
new invention. I could refer Pro-
fessor Pollock to a dozen similar
"corridors" of which four are right
here in this country. It is obvious,
therefore, that there exists numer-
ous international arrangements of
the "corridor" type, and that they
function to the satisfaction of ev-
erybody concerned.
The Polish "Corridor" is not "a
European Sore Spot," although it
might be a sore spot in the mind
of the German jingoist politicians,
for which the whole of Germany
certainly can not be blamed.
It is the now-evident dawning of
a reconciliation between Germany
and Poland that should be recorded
and broadcast by students of poli-
tics, rather than the occasional
"big noise" made by political wind-
bags.

OASTED LL
WARM
WEATHER
PROPHESIED
The Rolls Three-Speed - In - Re-
verse-With-A-Pink-Lace-Trimming
Weather Forecaster was dragged
out of its hole today and found
to indicate warm weather on its
way to Ann Arbor before very long.
Needless to say it was put back
into its hole with all possble speed
where it will remain until further
notice.
Rumor indicates that more
than six hundred people have
died of the heat in the past few
days. This isn't half enough. I
personally won't be satisfied un-
til all the people that infest
bathing beaches when I want
to swim on them have been
eliminated. And then, think of
what a really good heat-wave
would do for the unemployment
situation.
The Rolls Recommendation Bur-
eau is now once again in full swing
and opens the season by not rec-
commending that you register until
something happens to the weather.
In point of fact, the more you don't
register, classify, and in general
fool around with that collection in
dear old U. hall, the better off you
are, and that's no fact.
s* **
Why, we have just been in-
formed of the sad case of a fine
young fellow who went inno-
cently to that den of torturers
with nothing more vicious in
his mind than the paying of his
registration fee, and before
he'd been in the building five
minutes they had him slaving
away over a blank card five
ells long and twice that many
ells wide (10) which, after fill-
ing out all the sections which
say for women only at the end
after you have filled them out
already and all of them look
the same and you have to write
your Ann Arbor Address out
so often that you get to won-
dering whether it wouldn't
be easier to live in the office
and then they'd know where
you were all the time he went
crazy and they tore the blank
up and told him to come back
againdand register on account
of the office was goin to close
now because it was time to quit
besause they'd succeeded in
driving someone crazy that
day, and wouldn't he come
back and play again sometime
and he said no and ran away
screaming and that fellow was
me.
So you can see that it is a very
fine educational system we have
here. My personal opinion is that
if they succeed only in teaching
you to keep away from registration
offices in the future,-and God
knows they should succeed at that,
-they have fitted you for life in
the great world better than any
other educational institution or
state university in the world.
*0* *

Educational Institution.
. * * *
FURTHER NOTICE
It may be remembered that a
little while ago we put the Rolls
Forecaster away until now. If you
don't remember, you'd better go
back and look it up. You will find
out all about it in the first para-
grapjh of today's sunshine column.
Anyway, we've dragged it out again
and are now on our way to throw it
bodily and solely into Whitmore
Lake where it may rot.
* * *
POEM
GOODIE! Look! The sun is
shining.
Down upon us sunbeams fall.
That will kill a lot more people.
It's a fine world after all.
t *s 0
And now, children, the ENtire
Rolls staff is off to have a nice cool-
ing and refreshing drink, and if the
column isn't full, you can blame it
on the seductive ways of drug
stores. This is all today from-

Music & Drama
THE MICHIGAN REPERTORY
PLAYERS
For the benefit of new-comers,
the Michigan Repertory Players is
the rather too pompous name for a
group of students who are directed
by Mr. Windt and other guest di-
rectors in a series of plays offered
for the entertainment of those at-
tending the Summer Session at a
price only a few cents above that
charged at the local movie houses.
Principally, the group consists of
those students who became suffi-
ciently absorbed in their work with
Play Production during the regu-
lar school year to be willing to work
hard through the summer. In ad-
dition, there are students from
other colleges who have been at-
tracted to Michigan for the sum-
mer by the quality of direction they
can expect and the quality of the
plays that are produced here. All
of which means that the members
of the Michigan Repertory Players
are eager students of dramatic
production.
For the past two summers, their
work under the direction of Mr.
Windt and Chester Wallace of the
Carnegie School of Drama has been
the principal source of valuable en-
tertainment during the school ses-
sion.
The idea of a summer season
has made steady advance until this
year there has been announced
a list of plays very clearly more
ambitious and more consistently
worthwhile than either of previous
two lists. And in addition there
will be two distinguished directors
this year. The first is Thomas
Wood Stevens who long ago estab-
lished himself as one of the forces
in university drama by founding
and directing for ten years the Car-
negie Drama School. Mr. Stevens
has been recently director of the
Goodman Theatre in Chicago the
one liberal, experimental theatre.
The other director will be M. Jean
Mercier of the Cornish School in
Seattle. M. Mercier came to the
United States two years ago from
the famous Theatre du Vieux Col-
ombier Paris and has been secured
for theproduction of Marivaux 's
"Love and Chance"-one of the
masterpieces of French comedy.
The other plays of the season are
Moliere's "Don Juan in a special
adaptation by Mr. Stevens; Ferenc
Molnar's lovely fantasy Lilom;
Susan Glaspel's Alison's House, this
year's Pulitzer prize winner; Som-
erset Maugham's The Circle, the
very well-known comedy of man-
ners; and finally I Confess, a sat-
irical extravaganza on the confes-
sion story racket by William Myron
and Thomas Wood Stevens, which
will be givenits first performance
here preparatory to its Broadway
production next fall.
PHILIP BARRY AND "PARIS
BOUND"
Formerly a talented student of
the Harvard Workshop where he
won the big prize in 1922 with his
well-known "You and I," Philip
Barry has been offering the Broad-
way stage a significant success
nearly every year since. Last year's
"Hotel Univers", which was staged
by the Theatre Guild and is gen-
erally considered one of the most
inclusive efforts made by an Ameri-
can dramatist in a long time. This

year Barry's play is "Tomorrow and
Tomorrow" a play that has enjoyed
a long, quiet run and was prom-
inently mentioned for the Pulitzer
Play.
Ann Arbor knows Barry primarily
through his "Holiday" with which
the Michigan Repertory Players
opened last summer season so de-
lightfully, "Paris Bound" was the
predecessor to "Holiday." In it,
Barry brought to bear his sharp,
though apparently casual, critical
spirit on the sanctity of the mar-
riage vow for physical honesty. In
it, Barry revealed a real comic gift.
While giving full play to the shrewd
wit and marvelous nonsensical pat-
ter his civilized people are capable
of, he goes very deeply into the val-
ues that arise out of the union of
a man and a woman. The story
opens just after a young couple
have been married. They are bouy-
ant and hopeful and confident in
their decision, though somewhat
subdued by the spectacle of the
mess the bridegroom's parents have
made of their lives. Six years later
they are shown happy, a delightful
and solid relationship having been
established. This relationship is
threatened by the wife's suspicion
that on one occasion during those
six years her husband had been
physically unfaithful to her. This
situation precipitates some very
charming, very sane, very graceful
thinking and a splendid denoue-

I

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Michigan
TODAY
Adolph
Menjou
in.
"Men Call,
It Love"
with
LEILA
HYAMS
and
NORMAN
FOSTER
Also
Cartoon
Comedy
News
The Michigan is a delightful
place to spend an afternoon.
When its 90 on the street,
come in. Cool 70 degree tem-
peratures-You'll like it!
SUNDAY
"PUBLIC
ENEMY"

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$6.00 Work for $5.00
CALL AND DELIVER AT CASH
AND CARRY PRICES
GREENE CLEANERS

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OF ALL MAKES
BOUGHT, SOLD, RENTED,
EXCHANGED, CLEANED AND,
REPAIRED. Portables
L. C. Smith O. D. MORRILL Corona
Underwood 314 South State Street Barr
Royal The Typewriter and Stationery Royal
Remington Store.Rengn
Phone 6615 Remington
We have served Michigan and its students since 1908.

'"HOT ENOUGH
FOR YOU?"

How many times during the past
week has that question been asked?
Ordinarily the phrase is pleasant:
it suggests summer, recreation, and
the thousand attendant joys of the
warm season: but after ten days
of one of the worst heat waves the
country has ever experienced, the
salutation, is to say the least, ex-
tremely objectionable. Aside from
its hackneyed qualities, its use is
an insult to human intelligence.
In view of these facts The Daily
is considering the creation of a
fund for the extermination of in-
dividuals whose greeting-no mat-
ter what the temperature-is al-
ways, "Is it hot enough for you?"
When the fund has reached ade-
quate proportions, any person over-
heard making the remark will be
quietly lead away and incapaci-
tated by some slow and painful

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