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July 26, 1931 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-26

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SUNDAY, JULY .26, _1031

ME SUMMSR M CMGFAN DAILY

~R SUMMER MI(~HIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, JULY 26, 1931

Daily Official Bulletin
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
of the University. Copy received at the office of the Dean of the
Summer Session until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

SUNDAY, JULY 26; 1931

NUMBER 24)

Student Recital Series: This afternoon at Hill Auditorium
at 4:15 o'clock, Karl Kuersteiner will give a graduation recital leading
to a Master of Music degree. Mr. Kuersteiner has been a student of
Professor Wassily Besekirsky for the past two summers. During the
regular year he is Associate Professor of Violin at the University of
Kansas. The general public with the exception of small children is
cordially invited to attend. The program follows: Sinding, Romance;<
Barbella-Nachez, Larghetto; Rameau-Kreisler, Tambourin; Brahms,
Concerto in D Major-Allegro (Cadenza by M . Kuersteiner)-Adagio-
Vivace; Conklin, Caprice; Korsakoff-Franko, Hymn to the Sun; Kreisler,
Tambourin Chinois; Achron-Auer, Hebrew Lullaby; Bazzini, The Round
of the Goblins. Charles A. Sink
7 o'clock, Out-door Union Church Service: Speaker, Professor Al-
bert C. Jacobs of the Columbia University Law School. Topic, "Religion
and Family Law." 1432 Washtenaw avenue.
Change in Lecture: Assistant Professor Floyd A Firestone will uec-
ture on Monday afternoon, July 27, at 5:00, instead of on August 10.
The subject of Professor Firestone's lecture will be SOME EXPERI-
MENTS WITH SOUND. The lecture will be given in the West Lecture
Room of the West Physics Building. Edward H. Kraus
The Men's Educational Club will meet Monday at the Michigan
Union from 7 to 8 p.m. Professor Thomas Reed will speak on "The
Crisis in Local Government and School Administration." All men in-
terested in Education are welcome.
Afternoon Conference on Education: Professor Lydia I. Jones, Dean
of Women, Michigan State Normal College, will discuss "The Culture
of the" High School Student" at the afternoon conference to be held
Monday at 4:00 p.m. in the University High School Auditorium. All in-
terested in Education are urged to attend.

BARNES HAD GREAT
SUCCESS IN SHOWS
'xteen Years of His Life Were
Occupied by Troublesome
Legal Suits.
(Continued from Page One)
charging immoral relations. This
was a far different show for Barnes
and it began for him nearly sixteen
years as the central figure in many
courtroom scenes.
The divorce was denied but it
was the forerunner fo five similar
suits, filed at different periods by
either the husband or wife, ending
in 1921 at LasVegas, Nev., where
Barnes obtained a divorce on
grounds of desertion. The next
day, he married Jane Hartigan,
named by Mrs. Barnes as co-res-
pondent.
This second marriage brought a
renewal of domestic troubles. In
1923, Barnes obtained a divorce in

Las Vegas again, claiming the sec- l
ond Mrs. Barnes had horsewhippedl
him. Six years of court actions fol-
lowed by her in an effort to set
aside the decree, ending in 19291
when a Los Angeles court denied+
her contest.
With the ending of this suit,a
Barnes retired to a secluded life in'
Santa Monica, Cal.
Throughout his life in the cir-
cus, even in the most trying days
of court battles, Barnes was always
in the midst of the race of perform-
ances under the big tent, a vigor-
ous character who never rested
while the show was on.
Reporters, as they sought to in-
terview him on each new outburst
of court actions, took their stories
on the run as Barnes ran from tent
to tent, shoutinganswers to their
questions and bellowing directions
to move the turbulent show life
smoothly.
At its apex, his circus consisted
of 1,000 persons and hundreds of
animals, all transported in forty
railroad cars. Among the animals
were 100 dancing horses and Tus-

ko, an elephant- claimed to be the
largest in the world, whose ferocity
several times caused trouble. The
show visited every city of size in
the United States and went abroad
on several occasions.
Barnes sold the property in 1929
eto a syndicate which consolidated
it with several other well known
shows, Six months afterward, the
Barnes circus was wrecked in Can-
ada, four men killed and numerous
persons and animals hurt.
Throughout his court battles
with his first wife, Barneslaid her
actions to a desire to control the
circus. When they finally were di-
vorced he was understood to have
paid her $100,000 and this brought
a suit by A. L. Sands, a stockholder
who claimed he had used circus
money. It was settled out of court.
As a result of the numerous ac-
tions by his first wife, he was
charged with perjury and violations
of the Mann act. These complaints
later were dropped when he married
Miss Hartigan, who had provided
the testimony which caused them.
Near the close of the divorce bat-
tle with his first wife, Babe Eck-
hart, a performer in the circus who
had been named co-respondent by
the first Mrs. Barnes, committed
suicide while with the show in Ida-
ho.
In 1925, the government indicted
him for falsification of his income
tax and this was settled in 1927
when he paid the government $175,-
.000 in back taxes and a $5,000 fine.
Among the last actions brought
against him was a suit by a Cana-
dian newspaper for giving out a
false news story, a court returning
a $2,500 judgement for the paper.

We have all makes
Remington, Royal,
Corona, Underwood
Colored duco finishes. Price $60
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615

II

I I

SOUT H
STATG
Excellent
Foods
Amidst
Pleasant
Surround-

Phi Delta Kappa-The annual summer initiation will take place
Tuesday, July 28, at the Michigan Union. The initiation ceremony will
be held at 4 p.m. with the banquet following at 6 p.m. The speaker
of the evening will be President George F. Zook of Akron University,
Akron, Ohio. All members of Phi Delta Kappa are cordially invited, es-
pecially members of other chapters who may be in Michigan this sum-
mer. (L. O. Andrews, President of Omega Chapter)
Put-in-Bay Excursion: Party will leave at east entrance of the
Natural Science Building by motor bus at 7 a.m. and arrive at the dock
of the steamer "Put-in-Bay" at the foot of First Street, Detroit, at 8:45.
Steamer sails at 9 and arrives in Put-in-Bay at 12:45. Returning
steamer sails at 4 and arrives in Detroit at 8 p.m. Motor busses wait
at dock and party should reach Ann Arbor at 9:45 p.m. Round trip fare:
motor bus, $1.25, and steamer, $.75. Both tickets may now be obtained
at the Summer Session otice, Room 9, University Hall. Students bring-
ing picnic lunches will be able to keep total expenses under $3.00, in-
cluding admissions to the island caves. Those who wish may join the
party at the steamer. The excursion is compulsory for members of
Geology 31s. William H. Hobbs

I

ings

4 4 4

11

Pi Lambda Theat and the Women's Education Club are having a
joint meeting on Monday, July 27th, at 7:15 in the Alumnae room of the
Michigan League. D:. F. W. Hubbard, Assistant Director of the Research
Division of the N. E. A. will speak concerning Professionalism and Pro-
fessional Organizations. Helen Sooey will give a vocal solo.
Esther L. Belcher
Faculty Conccr Series: The fourth concert in the summer series
will be given on Tuesday evening at Hill Auditorium at 8:15 o'clock.
Assistant Professor Joseph Brinkman of the Piano faculty will present
the following program which the general public is invited to attend.
No admission charge. Beethoven, Sonata, Op. 10, No. 3-Presto-Largo
e mesto-Menuetto-Rondo: Respighi, Gagliarda (Galilei 155.), Siciliana
(Ignoto 16.), Passacaglia: Chopin, Ballada, G minor, Nocturne, Op. 72,
No. 1, Waltz, D fiat, Etude, Op. 25, No. 11: Brinkman, Sonata-Allegro
moderato-Scherzetto-Andantino-Allegro maestoso.
Physics Colloquium: Mr. W. F. Westendorp, of the Research Labor-
atory at the General Electric Company in Schenectady, will talk on
"Measurement on Metastable Atoms of Neon", at 4:15 Tuesday in Room
1041, East Physics Building. All interested are invited to attend.
W. F. Colby
Mathmatical Club: A summer meeting will be held Tuesday, JulyI
28, at 4 p.m. in room 3011 A. H. Professor Peter Field will speak on the
"Problem of the Top". All who wish to come will be made welcome.
N. Anning, Secretary
Excursion No. 6a: A repetition of Excursion No. 6-the Ford Air-
port; also, a visit to Henry Ford's unique museum of Americana known
as Greenfield Village, which includes examples of American architecture
of 100 years ago, and Thomas A. Edison's original Menlo Park laboratory.
The party leaves Wednesday, July 29, at one o'clock, from in front of
Angell Hall. Round trip by motorbus, $1.00. Reservations must be made
before 5 p.m. Tuesday, July 28, in room 9, University Hall. The number
of students who can be accommodated is limited. Carlton F. Wells

;

f

Id

Majestic
NOW SHOWING

Baptist Students: . Sunday, 12:00 to 12:40. West transept of Church.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Boy Scout Executive, will speak. All welcome.
Wesleyan Guild: Sunday Evening Devotional Meeting-6 o'clock
in Wesley Hall. Miss Ethel McCormick, Social Director for Women, will
be the speaker. Miss McCormick's subject will be "Social Activities in
Colleges and Universities." Refreshments will be served. You are cor-
dially invited to attend.
Southerners: The Women's I
League invites you as its special
guest to the tea dance Wednesday M IC HI G A N
at the League, fom 4 to 5:30. KaherneO'Har, LageiPes
Katherine O'Hearn, League Pres.

In choosing your
eating place, it is
well to consider
your surround-
ings as well as
the quality of the
food. At the Par-
rot you will find
the highest qual-
ity foods served
in a most con-
genial atmos-
phere.

Students in Physical Education
are invited to the tea dance Wed-
nesday at the Women's League,
from 4 to 5:0.
Katherine O'Hearn, League Pres.
There has been condirable ex-
pression of a desire to have an in-
formal get to-gether of the school
men of the Upper Peninsula. Will
all who are interested in such a
gathering meet after the Monday
evening session of the Men's Edu-
cation Club.
C. E. Hertz

STARTING TODAY

the

Robert

Montgomery

P

in

The Man

A

in

Possession'

Michigan Repertory Players
THIS WEEK BEGINNING WEDNESDAY
THE PULITZER PRIZE PLAY

R

,

with

Charlotte Greenwood

Irene Purcell

LISO

'S HOUS''

also

Jean Arthur
h/e
'LA'WYER'S
SECRET
a paramount Qicture
One man killed, another cringing
in fear of the law . . . four guilt-
less lives thrown into a turmoil of
danger, suspense, despair! Why?
The lawyer knows!
,"'. U ADDEDU1-

R

BOBBY JONES
"THE SPOON"

0

-SUSAN GLASPELL

DIRECTED BY THOMAS WOOD STEVENS
FIRST TIME OUTSIDE OF NEW YORK

Monday Night
Owl Feature

ANDY CLYDE
TALKARTOON
NOVELTY ACT

MENDELSSOHN

THEATRE

"The Man Who
Came Back"
Charles Farrell
Janet Gaynor

14

00

- TUESDAY

SOUTH
STATE
STREET

I

For Reservations Phone 6300

John Barrymore
"SVENGALI"

I

I
pp

WANT ADS PAY

k
;i;,

Michigan Union Cafeteria
OFF ERS

A

Well Balanced Meal
Forty-Five Cents

SODA BAR --7:30 P. Me

SWIMMING POOL 1-7 P. M.

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