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July 25, 1931 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-25

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PAIR Q'!U!t

IE S JMIVIBR MIGffiG}AN DAILZ

A'I'"URIIAY, JULY 25, 1831

PAGE FOUR 1~HE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, JULY 25, 1931

Daily Of f icial Bulletin
Publication in the Bulletin s constructive notice to all members
of the University. Copy received at the office of the Dean of the
Summer Session until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a.m. Saturday.
VOLUME XI SATURDAY, JULY 25, 1931 NUMBER 23
Excursion No. 6a: A repetition of Excursion No. 6-the Ford Air-
port; also, a visit to Henry Ford's unique museum of Americana known
as Greenfield Village, which includes examples of American architecture
of 100 years ago, and Thomas A. Edison's original Menlo Park laboratory.
The party leaves Wednesday, July 29, at one o'clock, from in front of
Angell Hall. Round trip by motorbus, $1.00. Reservations must be made
before 5 p.m. Tuesday, July 28, in room 9, University Hall. The number
of students who can be accommodated is limited. Carlton F. Wells
College of Literature, Science and the Arts; School of Music: Per
mission to drop courses without "E" grade will not be given after July
25. No course is considered officially dropped unless it has been reported
to the Director of Classification, Room 4, University Hall.
Graduate School: Students enrolled in the Graduate School will
not be permitted to drop courses after Saturday, July 25. A course is
not officially dropped until it is reported in the office of the Graduate
School, 1014 Angell hall.
Students who have changed their elections since submitting elec-
tion cards should call this week at the office of the Graduate School,
1014 Angell hall. This involves the dropping and adding of courses,
the substitution of one course for another, as well as the change of in-
structors. G. Carl Huber, Dean
School of Education: Permission to drop courses without "E" grades
will not be given after July 25. No course is considered officially drop-
ped unless it has been reported in the Recorder's Office of the School
of Education, Room 1431, University Elementary School.
Elizabeth R. Clark, Recorder
Baptist Students: .Sunday, 12:00 to 12:40. West transept of Church.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Boy Scout Executive, will speak. All welcome.
Mathematical Club: A summer meeting will be held Tuesday, July
28, at 4 p.m., in room 3011 A. H. Professor Peter Field will speak on
the "Problem of the Top". All who wish to come will be made welcome.
N. Anning, Secretary
"Coming Events": .Sunday evening out-door union church ser-
vice. Speaker, Professor Albert C. Jacobs of the Columbia University
law school. Topic, "Religion and Family Law." 1432 Washtenaw Ave.
One-Act Plays: glay Production offers a laboratory presentation
of three one-act plays at 3 o'clock this afternoon in the Lydia Mendels-
sohn theatre. Season ticket holders and others interested in Play
Production work are invited to this free bill. Please note the change in
time.
Summer Plays: The final performance of Marivaux's "Love and
Chance", under the direction of Jean Mercier, will be given tonight.
Next week's play will be Susan Glaspell's Pulitzer Prize in Drama,-
"Allison's House" and will be directed by Thomas Wood Stevens. Tickets
are now available for all performances.
Wesleyan Guild: Sunday Evening Devotional Meeting-6 o'clock
in Wesley Hall. Miss Ethel McCormick, Social Director for Women, win
be the speaker. Miss McCormick's subject will be "Social Activities in
Colleges and Universities." Refreshments will be served. You are cor-
dially invited to attend.
Student Recital Series: On Sunday afternoon at Hill Auditorium
at 4:15 o'clock, Karl Kuersteiner will give a graduation recital leading
to a Master of Music degree. Mr. Kuersteiner has been a student of
Professor Wassily Besekirsky for the past two summers. During the
regular year he is Associate Professor of Violin at the University of
Kansas. The general public with the exception of small children is
cordially invited to attend. The program follows: Sinding, Romance;
Barbella-Nachez, Larghetto; Ram-
eau-Kreisler, Tambourin; Brahms,
Concerto in D Major-Allegro (Ca-
denza by Mr. Kuersteiner)-Adagio 0 Michigan Rep,
-Vivace: Conklin, Caprice; Korsa- g
koff-Franko, Hymn to the Sun;
Kreisler, Tambourin Chinos; Ach- O
ron-Auer, Hebrew Lullaby; Bazzini, j
The Round of the Goblins. U
Charles A. Sink
Change in Lecture: Assistant lO
Professor Floyd A. Firestone will
lecture on Monday afternoon, July I
27, at 5:00, instead of on August 10. and
The subject of Professor Firestone's V

CHILEAN STUDENTS
DEFY GOVERNM9ENT
ULTIMATUM IN RIOT

"00 Barricaded in Str
Dare Police and Tra

onghold
oops

to Fire on Them.
PREMIER SEEKS ORDER
Authorities Decide Not to Use
Force After University Men
Refuse Concessions.
SANTIAGO, Chile, July 24.-(iP)
-Anti-government students, who
remained barricaded in University
of Chile Thursday night in defi-
ance of an ultimatum and dared
troops to fire on them, stuck to
their posts today while the authori-
ties attempted to deal with them
peacefully.
Meanwhile from 300 to 500 per-
sons nursed cracked heads and
other injuries received during a tur-
bulent night in the course of which
a firearms store was looted, several
street cars wrecked and the princi-
pal streets were the scenes of al-
most continuous clashes between
demonstrators and police. Mounted

men, armed with lances, were used
to quell the demonstration.
New Premier Involved.
A few hours after he had become
premier of Chile Thursday, Carlos
Froedden took over the task of re-
storing order, and he quickly
served notice on the barricaded
students that unless they vacated
their stronghold they would be
fired on. At that time about 200
students and sympathizers were
estimated to be in the building.
The students refused to budge,
and word got about that they had
decided to set fire to the building{
and, if need be, die in it rather
than surrender. This decision, it
'was said, was communicated by
telephone to President Carlos Iba-
nez, against whom the demonstra-
tion was directed.
No Shots Fired.
When the ultimatum expired at
10 p.m. there was no broadside
from the troops. Subsequently it
was reported the government de-
cided not to resort to extreme force.
Shortly after the ultimatum had
been made public the physicians'
association resolved to call a city-
wide strike and treat no one ex-
cept wounded students in case guns
were used by the authorities.
The principal military leaders of
Chile today renewed their pledges
of loyalty to President Ibanez and
he is conceded to have the un-
wavering support of the Carabine-
ros, the strongest armed organiza-
tion in the country.

Warden Has Cells Searched as
Impending Convict Revolt
Rumor Spreads.
JOLIET, Ill., July 24.-('P)-A
methodical search of the new state
penitentiary for weapons was start-
ed today under the direction of
Warden Henry C. Hill following the
second rumor of impending convict
revolution in three days.
The 2,100 convicts will be kept
in their cells, save for dining and
brief recreation periods, through-
out the search, which Hill said
would require about ten days. Even
the convicts' mattresses will be in-
spected.
Inasmuch as saws, sledge ham-
mers, hoes and many other tools
used by convicts are missing, Ward-
en Hill said he believed the search
would be well worth the time and
trouble.

AVERTISINS
LOST-Brown leather coin purse,
University golf course, Wednes-
day. Finder please call 3718.
LOOK AT THIS BARGAIN-Brand
new $100 Gibson tenor banjo and
case for sale at fraction of cost.
Phone 7017. 25, 26
WANTED-By starving University
graduate, job requiring poise,
personality, and ability, compen-
sated accordingly. Reply D-13,
The Daily.
LOST-Elgin watch with knife,
chain; probably on Olivia; mark-
ed WCM and FJM. Chain lost on
South U. W. C. Moffatt, 1408
Washtenaw; phone 9235.
LARK ANNOUNCES
WANT ADS PAY
LAST TIMES TODAY

Dorothy

lecture will be SOME EXPERIMENTS WITH SOUND. The lecture will
be given in the West Lecture Room of the West Physics Building.
Edward H. Kraus
Pi Lambde Theta and the Women's Education Club are having a
joint meeting on Monday, July 27th, at 7:15 in the Alumnae room of the
Michigan League. Professor F. W. Hubbard, Assistant Director of the
Research Division of the N.E.A. will speak on some phase of research
for women. Helen Sooey will give a vocal solo. Esther L. Belcher

The Men's Educational Club
will meet Monday at the Michigan
Union from 7 to 8 p.m. Professor
Thomas Reed will speak on "The
Crisis in Local Government and
School Administration." All men
interested in Education are wel-
come.
Afternoon Conference on Edu-
cation: Professor Lydia I. Jones,
Dean of Women, Michigan State
Normal College, will discuss "The
Culture of the High School Stu-
dent" at the afternoon conference
to be held Monday at 4:00 p.m. in
the University High School Audi-
torium. All interested in Education
are urged to attend.

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Last Performnance
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All Seats 75c
For Reservations Phone 6300
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500 Boxes
Each package contains one quire of good quality Vellum engraved with
Michigan and Seal in blue.

HURON
COME TO DETROIT
any day this Summer, park your car on the dock, and enjoy this all-day
sail over the great International Highway of Lakes and Rivers. Free
Dancing on the boat. Splendid Caieteria and Lunch Service. See Detroit
river front, Belle Isle, Lake St. Clair, the Flats and the celebrated "Venice
of America." This cruise of 61 miles each way takes you through a con-
stantly changing panorama of rare land and water views.
Port Huron, Sarnia, St. Clair Flats, Algonac
Starting this trip from Port Huror. passengers leave at 3:10 p. m., arriving
in Detroit at 7:45 p. m. Returning, leave Detroit at 9 the next morning,
arriving in Port Huron at 2:10 p. m.
Str. Tashmioo leaves Griswold St. Dock at 9 a. m., Daily and Sunday; arrive
Port Huron 2:10 p. rj. Returning, leave PORT H URON, 3:10 p. m., arrive
Detroit 7:45 p. u'. FARiES: Tashmoo Park or St. Clair Flats, week days 75c;
Sundays, $1.00, R. T. Port Huron or Sarnia, Ont., one way, $1.10, R.T. $2.
TASHMOO PARK
half-gay betwen Detroit and Port Huron is Detroit's favorite pleasure park
where you may spend six hours and return on Str. Tashmoo in the
evening. Free dancing in the pavilion; picnic in the grove, baseball, golf
and all outdoor sports and amusements.
" " reading G3. T. Ry., between Detroit ixind Port
Ra I.road Tickts Huron, are good on Str. Tashmoo either dirsetion
Dancing Moonlights to Sugar Island
Drive to Detroit and enjoy an evening of music and dancing on Str.
Tashmoo and in the pavilion at Sugar Iland. Tickets 75c. Park on the
dock. Leave at 8:45 every evening.
RANDOLPH D PDIUI AD TD TAl AAfl FootofGrisweldSt.

WAHR'S

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