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June 06, 1930 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1930-06-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE SUMTVIER MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JULY 6 1930

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, JULY 6, 1930

STAGE
WHISPER
By Helen Carrm, '31.
Apparently when a New Yorker
does things he does them in the
marathon manner. Both Wallace
and Hickman have been spending
this entire week casting three
plays, one of which is being re-
hearsed before, after, and during
meals.
"Close Harmony," the first of
these plays, is to be presented this
week, beginning Wednesday. Ches-
ter Wallace is directing it himself,
which makes it ° somewhat more
than interesting. Incidentally, some
new infants are getting 'the big
chance.' I don't know their names
yet, but I'll get hold of them for
you very shortly. They're terrific-
ally nice people, so it promises to
be rather fun playing with them.
Two plays that have been defi-
nitely decided on are "The Crimi-
nal Code," by Martin Flavin, and l

EXHIBIT SHOWS ADMITTING WOMEN
AS PROBLEM FOR EARLY REGENTS

Library Display Depicts College'
Administration Methods
of Last Century.
What the University was like in
the "good old days" may be gleaned
from a series of documents and pic-
tures now on exhibition in the lob-,
by of the Library.,
Present regulations may seem
strict, but there was a time when'
even the admission of woman stu-
dents was forbidden. Strange as it
may seem, a section of the appen-
dix to the proceedings of the Board
of Regents for 1858 indicates that,
this was one of the pressing ques-
tions of the day.
Some of the leading educators of
the time argued that opening the
University facilities to women
would be an innovation never con-
templated by the University's fol-
lowers or patrons; that it would be

character and influence and ruin-
ous to any women who might take
advantage of it.
The committee to which the issue
was referred entered upon the in-
vestigation, fully impressed with
the importance of the subject, ap-
parently regarding it as second to
no question that had engaged their
attention.
A view of the campus in 1860
shows only a few scattered build-
ings, surrounded by a picket fence,
with cows grazing among the
stumps on the lawn. The Varsity
band of this period had only six
members. An early picture of the
medical faculty shows a total of
six men.
Electing courses in 1860 must
have been relatively simple. The
whole catalogue for that year was
composed of four pages. It an-
nounced the courses to be taken by
students of each year and outlined
the regulations of the University.

Civil Service Board
Seeks Man to Work
as Patent Examiner
Open competitive examinations
for the position of junior patent
examiner will be held late in Aug-
ust, according to a recent an-
nouncement by the United States
Civil Service commission.
"The duties are to perform ele-
mentary scientific or technical work
in the examination of applications
for patents," the commission stated,
"to see what the alleged inventor
thinks he has produced that is
new; and to investigate the priority
as represented by patents already
granted in the United States and
various foreign countries, and by
the descriptions in various techni-
cal literature."
Competitors will be rated on
physics, technics, mechanical draw-
ings, and any of the following de-
sired: mechanical engineering,
physical and organic chemistry,
chemical engineering, civil engi-
neering, and electrical engineering.

destructive

to the University's I

If

Dook, and saia, "I enjoyed your play
Graduate Courses in English: Graduate students in English are the other evening, young lady."
expected to attend two lectures on "Primary Aids to Research" which And then he frowned and added,
will be given by Professor W. G. Rice on Monday and Tuesday, July 7 "But it strikes me that that play-
and 8, at 5 o'clock, in 2225 A. H. room scene was a bit too-well-
sophisticated. More like a saloon
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS - Stu- UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS-Twenty than anything else. All that cham-
dents of the university will be con-t. pagne and those cigarettes. Pret-
ducted on a tour of places connect- two students are enrolled in the ty bad, young lady!"
ed with the life of the author O. summer geology camp of the uni- Which reminds me-the life of
Henry, in the near future. versity. an actor is a difficult one.

I

I

WANT ADS PAY! i
YO UU RU MERUM M ERUIIII""'""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""i1tlII111UII11111P'J11811"'"""""""""""""IIIIHII """""""""""'""""""111111111""II"""""""""""""111t1
OUUp Where It's Cool...
OPPOR TUNIT
Make This Summer Count ) 0
More and more young people are deciding to take advantage oi _-
the summer vacation months by enrolling for a business course. MIC H IG A N -
Some do It as sort of a "finishing course" to their high school
training. Others take up business training so they can help earn-p
their way through the University beginning in the fall. Still others
decide on business training as preparation for their life work and -L-
make a three months' start by beginning their training in sum- - h "-C
mer.4..L AU
Whatever your present plan may be, we believe you will want .
to know more about our Summer Term. Your name and address
on the bottom of this advertisement will bring you full details.
Tear It out and mail it in today.
& _. Welcome8
COURSES omen Student8 o
Shorthand Dictaphone I --
Bookkeeping Calculatoe SummerS_
Typewriting Secretariax .
Training The high elevation of Observatory Lodge means sum-
mer comfort . . Up there on Washington Heights a DINING SERVICE
HAM ILTON breeze always blows-and the pleasant, unobstructed view G ROOME
of the Huron River hills and valleys is decidedly refresh-
BUSINESS COT EGE ing . . . Just another reason why Observatory Lodge CAFETERIA
State & William Sts. is known as Ann Arbor's Most Homelike Apartments .. .
- .and Soda Fountain
At Washington Heights and Observatory Street
i I111111 IIll ll ll llllllll lll llll llill1 illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll? 111111111111 11111111111111111 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 11
OPENING WEDNESDAY KIGHT
Also Thursday and Saturday Evenings
(NO PERFORMANCE FRIDAY)
SEATS --(' aM UN-6300
75 E -U E .for
CENTS "E fYReservations
By Elmer Rice and Dorothy Parker
Box office open tomorrow 10-5 Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
QUALITY FOODS REASONABLE PRICES
Zhe UNION CAFETERIA
SPECIAL LVNCHEONS AND DINNERS FIFTY CENTS

.1

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