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August 06, 1930 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1930-08-06

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SUMMER MICMUAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1930

llPLUA~ll lRP6 overnment Orders
DIPLOMATIC CPSGscrappingaat
R EOU ESTS UNIFORM' Under Naval Treaty

GERMAN AVIATORS CLASTSINED
ABANDON VNTUREI____________

Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received at the office of the Dean of the Sum-
mar Session until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a. m. Saturday.
VOL. X. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1930 NUMBER 32
An International Forum Meeting will be held in the Auditorium of
Lane Hall (corner State and Washington) this evening at 7:45 p.m.
Prof. Arthur N. Holcombe, of the Department of Government, Harvard
University, will speak on "What is International Peace?" All foreign and
American students, faculty members, and their friends are cordially in-
vited. Refreshments. International Committee.
The Women's League invites all students of the Summer Session to
open house in the League Building Friday, August 8, from 9 to 12. Danc-
ng and Bridge. Isabelle Rayen, Summer President.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SUMMER CONCERT BAND

Women's League Tea: The Women's League tea which was to havej
been held Thursday at 4:00 has been postponed.
Margaret Marin, Social Chairman.
Afternoon Conference on Education: The final afternoon conference
for this week will be held in the University High School Auditorium
Wednesday, at 4:00 p.m., at which time Prof. Edgar G. Johnston will
discuss "Extra Curricular Activities as an Aid in the Guidance of Stu-
dents." All interested in Education are urged to attend.
Thomas Diamond.
Teachers, Supervisors, and Principals: Teachers who are interested
in pictures suitable for school and class room work should visit the 4th
floor of the University High School Building where an exhibit of German
etchings is on display this week. Thomas Diamond.
Women Students who are interested in seeing and hearing more
about the.New Elementary School Unit are invited to meet in the lower
corridor of the University High School at 4:30 Thursday, August 7. Dr.
Willard C. Olson will conduct the party through the building.
Berniece Backus.
Phi Delta Kappa: There will be an important business meeting of
the active members of Phi Delta Kappa for the election of new members
in Room 302 of the Michigan Union at 7:30 tonight. Active membership
is defined as student membership in the Summer Session.
W. C. Darling.
Students and Instructors in Education: An appraisal of the Sum-
mer School work in Education will be made in classes on Thursday, Au-'
gust 7th. Will all persons concerned kindly co-operate.
C. 0. Davis, Sec'y.
Pi Lambda Theta is honoring associate members Wednesday evening
at the League at 7:30. All members of Pi Lambda Theta are urged to
be present. Esther L. Belcher.
Liberal Discussion Group: The meeting will be addressed by Mrs.
Louis Gomon, of Detroit, a member of the American Civil Liberties
Union, on the topic: "The Real Issues in Detroit Politics," Thursday eve-
ning, August 7, 7:15 p.m., third floor of the Michigan Union.
John M. Brumm.
Detroit Civil Service Examinations for Positions in Social Work: On
August 12 there will be held an examination at the Detroit Civil Service
Commission in Detroit for positions in case work. Applications to take
that examination should be sent in at least one week previously. I should
be glad to talk with any students who might be interested. I can be
reached in my office daily at ten o'clock. (Signed) A. E. Wood.
Graduate School: Students who expect to receive the master's de-
gree at the close of the present Summer Session should call at the office
of the Graduate School to check their records and make payment of the
ten-dollar diploma fee. Sabina Conrad, Recorder.
Take a Boat Ride to Port Huron on
Big Str. Tashmoo
Come to Detroit any day this Summer, park your car on the dock, and enjoy
this all-day sail over the great International Highway of Lakes and Rivers.
Free Dancing on the boat. Splendid Cafeteria and Lunch Service. See

Foreign Service Journal Holds
Center of Discussion for
Diplomatic Uniforms.
SERVICE PERMITS NONE
American Ambassadors Dislike
Necessity for Evening
Dress in Morning.I
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Aug. 5.-Agita-
tion for the splendors and glory of!
ta uniform with plumed hat and
sword for American diplomats has
again sprung up among foreign
service officers.
The discussion was brought
about by an article in the Ameri-
can Foreign Service Journal, offi-
cial organ of the organization to
which virtually all foreign service
officers, including consuls and dip-
lomats, belong.
Demand Is Frequent.
Admitting the subject to be a
delicate one, the Journal merely
reprinted without comment corre-
spondence submitted on the ques-
tion. Time and again in recent
years, uniforms for service officers
have been agitated for, but with-I
out result.
Most of the governments of the
world have a uniform for their
diplomats, with the rank of the in-
-4ividual indicated by the amount
of gold braid showing. Ambassa-
dors have the most resplendent.
ones, often with nearly as much,
braid as coat material.
Diplomats Evade Ban.-
In the American service, how-;
ever, no diplomatic uniforms arej
permitted, so ambassadors and
ministers to many countries which
adhere to the old traditions must1
wear full evening dress when call-]
ing at the palace even during the1
morning. Some American diplo-l
mats have evaded the ban, how-
ever, by obtaining commissions in7
the army reserve or other service<
reserve and appearing at various1
functions in military uniforms. '

(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Aug. 5.-First in
ratifying the London naval' treaty,
the United States today stood first
also in placing its terms in effect.
Three of its 18 battleships have
been ordered withdrawn for scrap-
ping this fall.
The Wyoming, Utah and Florida
will see the end of their long ser-
vice before the year is out. The
treaty does not require their dis-
posal until much later but besides
the international disarmament ex-
ample involved, the United States
will find in their retirement a sav-
ing of nearly $4,000,000.
This economy is the first to be
made known by a government de-
partment since President Hoover's
recent call for a reduction of all
expenditures in the government de-
partments which will not lessen ef-
ficiency or cause unemployment.
READER OUTLINES
ENGLISH TRAINING
(Continued From Page Three)
must know the whole history of
costume and how to make and wear
everything they need for the the-
atre.
Miss Fogerty is especially inter-
ested in the growth of the Little
Theatre in America, and asserted
that such a movement means a
great dramatic revival in England
and France as well as in this coun-
try. "People are writing new plays
that are vivid and real, instead of
plays that are derivative. But we
cannot eliminate from the theatre
romance and improbabilities. The
theatre must not grow common-
place." Miss Fogerty went on to
comment upon the close relation-
ship between American universities
and theatres.
Miss Fogerty stressed the great
revival in religious drama in Eng-
land. "A great miracle play, writ-'
ten by John Masefield, was given
last Easter at Canterbury Cathe-
dral. This year the church of Saint
Bartholomew has done a great
pageant in memory of its founder.
I have done a great deal of work
along this line, and find that in-
terest in the religious drama is
growing everywhere in England."

Lack of Landing Place, Demands
of Denmark Government
Discourage Flight.
(By Associated Press)
REYKJAVIK, Iceland, Aug. 5.-
Wolfram Hirth, young German avi-'
ator who wished to fly from Iceland
to Greenland and the United States,
was bound for Montreal today
aboard the steamship Minnedosa,
with his plane strapped securely to
ithe ship's deck. He will fly from
Montreal to New York, while his
companion, Oscar Wheeler, will
take the next ship home to Ger-
many.
The two aviators abandoned their
projected flight when the governor
of Greenland notified them that
there were no suitable landing
places in southern Greenland and
when the Danish government re-
quested a deposit of 100,000 kroner
(about $2,700) for expense and
trouble they might bring to the
government in the event they made
the flight.t
They arrived here Aug. 1, after l
leaving Berlin July 24. They flew
by way of Colonge, Calais, Croydon I
and the Orkney islands.

TYPING-Theses a specialty. Fair
rates. Dial 9087. M. Hartsuff.
30, 42
WANTED-A small apartment with
kitchenette. For married couple;
to be occupied for the next
school year. Location preferably
on East side. Reply Box 333.
28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33
LOST
LOST-Wednesday, oblong topaz
set in white gold. Finder please
call Magdalene Berston, 4093.
Reward. 31, 32
WANT ADS PAY!

PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
We have all makes.
Remington, Royals,
Corona, Underwood
Colored duco finishes.

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Price $60

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314 South State St.

314 South State St.
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Phone 6615

DANCE AT JEAN GOLDKET TE'S
BLUE LANTERN -BALL ROOM,
ISLAND LAKE
Scarlet Mask Band-Ohio State University
On Grand River 11/2 miles east of Brighton, 6 miles west of New Hudson
DANCING NIGHTLY, EXCEPT MONDAYS.
SUNDAYS CONTINUOUS FROM 6 P. M.

SE

NOW
ROWING

WUERTH.

2:00--3:30
7:00-:00

WUERTH 7 :0O-9:00

HARRY
GREEN

FANNIE
BRICE

IN

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<tBE YOURSELF"

I

The funniest picture you've ever seen with the queen of comediennes
talking, singing and dancing her way in a dynamic romance of the
night clubs and the prize-ring.

.n

Unovninl

I1

Detroit river front, Belle Isle, Lake St. Clair, the Flats and the celebrated
"Venice of America." This cruise of 61 miles each way takes you through
a constantly changing panorama of rare land and water views.
Port Huron, Sarnia, St. Clair Flats, Algonac
Str. Tashmoo leaves Griswold St. Dock at 9 a. m., Daily and Sunday; ar-
rive Port Huron 2 p. m. Returning, leave PORT HURON, 3:10 p. m.,
arrive Detroit 7:45 p. m. FARES: Tashmoo Park or St. Clair Flats, weekdays
$1; Sundays, $1.25, R.T. Port Huron or Sarnia, Ont., one way, $1.10, R.T. $2.
TASHMOO PARK
half-way between Detroit and Port Huron is Detroit's favorite pieasure park
where you may spend six hours and return on Str. Tashmoo in the eve-
ning. Free dancing in the pavilion; picnic in the grove, baseball, golf and
all outdoor sports and amusements.
FOR AN AF7ERNOON RIDE
Take Str. Florida to St. Clair Flats or Tashmoo Park, Lv. 1:30 p.m. Return
on Str. Tashmoo, 7:45 p. ni., week days. SUNDAY S, Lv. 2 p. m. Return
7:45 or 10:15 p. m. Three hours at Tashmoo Park; four hours at St. Clair
Flats; Fare, weekdays, $1 R. T. Sundays, $1.25 R. T.

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MZCHUAV

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land. Tickets 75c. Park
.. "'' , on the dock. Leave at
8:45 every evening.
RANd H WHITE STAR NAVIGATION CO. Foot of GiswI S.

1®i 11

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