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August 02, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1930-08-02

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2, 90

THE l UMM MICMGAN DAILY

2, 1980 THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

-,

WOOCOCK TO ASK
FOR ENLARGEMENT
ODRY PERSONNEL
New Prohibition Head Believes
Increased Enforcement
Squad Necessary.

Baseball Rajah Hopes
for Action This Season

I FEDERAL WEATHER BUREAU REPORTS
JULY AS HOTTEST MONTH ON RECORD
(By Associated Press)

WANTS

FORCE

OF 2,5001

J. M. Doran, Head of Bureau of
Industrial Alcohol, to
Request Increase.
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Aug. 1.-Convin-
ced after two days of meetings with
his 12 regional administrators that
an increased personnel is essential
Amos W. W. W~4dcock, dlirector
of prohibition, will ask congress for
a 25 percent enlargement of his
forces.
James M. Doran, chief of the
bureau of industrial alcohol of the
treasury, also will seek an increase.
The Woodcock decision is no
"cry of despair," he maintained to-
day. Ite is confident that with the
personnel increased from 2,000 to
about 2,500, stricter enforcement
will be obtained and that his con-
centrated drive against large scale
violators will be more effective.
Directors Ask More.
The recommendation is the re-
suit of demands from his field di-
rectors. Woodcock, who has just
taken over the prohibition task for
the justice department, already felt
more men were needed but had ex-
pected to leave a definite decision
until he had gained more personal
experience. T h e overwhelming
sentiment of his lieutenant, how-
ever, made up his mind.
Today the new dry czar wound
up his conference with the field
workers, consulting them with a
dozen picked men who are to head
a special squadron of 200 agents
detailed to ferret out wholesale
liquor conspiracies. He planned
also a talk before the industrial
alcohol permit supervisors on the
co-operation expected between the
two forces.
Doran Wants 120 Men.
The Doran forces, for which an
increase of 120 men is sought, are
holding a conference parallel with
that caused by the prohibition su-
pervisor.
Another contribution to the pro-
hibition discussion came last Thurs-
day night from Assistant Secretary
Lowman of the treasury, who, in a
radio address said only 2 per cent
of the liquor now sold in this coun-
try came from Canada and that of
the $25,000,000 of i n t o x icants
brought in last year from the do-
minion, much was "short-circuited"
back to Canadian bootleggers.
Built as a courthouse in 1819 to
serve Simpson county, a crude log
building near Franklin Ky., is still
tenanted.

WASHINGTON, Aug. 1. - July,
1930, passed into history today with
preliminary figures at the weather
bureau indicating it was the hottest
month ever recorded.
While reports from all of the
weather stations have not been an-
alyzed, a compilation of tempera-
tures registered at the larger sta-
tions shows it was hotter for a
longer time and over a larger area
than in any previous period since
temperature records were estab-
lished.
From July 4 to July 30 not a
single day passed without a tem-
perature of 100 or hotter being of-
ficially registered at some place in
the country. This was exclusive,
weather bureau officials said, of
such points as Phoenix and Yuma,
Ariz., where 100 is a summer com-
monplace..
The coming of August brought
no sign of relief from the crop-
devastating drought.
Displaying the traditional con-,

servatism of the weather bureau,
J. B. Kincer, chief agricultural me-
teorologist, said predictions of am-
ateur "weather sharks" that August
will be another scorcher are "a bit
premature."
"August usually averages a shade
cooler than July," he said. "I will
say that the prospects of there be-
ing another spell like the recent
one are very unlikely, and there is
some consolation in that."

Ann Arbor Savings Bank
DOWN TOWN OFFICE CAMPUS OFFICE
Main and Huron 707 North University
RESOURCES OVER $7,000,000
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Have just received a large shipment of brand new titles at
$1.00 each
-W- A RV S University
IV A ~ SBookstore

11

' (By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Aug. 1-Rogers Horns-
by is certain he will be ready to
play second base regularly for the
Cubs before the season is over-re-
gardless of what anyone else might
think.
The Rajah has never been down-
hearted over injuries that have
kept him out of action. After his
workout yesterday he said he felt
like a player reporting for spring
"The bones are O. K.," he said.
"As soon as the muscles and liga-
ments loosen up I should be able to
play. I can't set any date, but I
feel like a fellow reporting for
training-just enough overweight to
require plenty of work and eager
for the 'season to start.'"
Disobedience Campaign
Causes Mill Shutdown
(By Associated Press)
BOMBAY, India, Aug. 1.-Six cot-
ton mills were closed down here to-
day, carrying out orders given a
month ago because of business de-
pression resulting from the civil
disobedience movement and boy-
cott of Indian mill-made cloth.
The shutdown threw 13,000 op-
eratives out of work. Other mills
are scheduled to close Aug. 15 in-
volving thousands of other opera-
tives.
Among the Best -
and at
Reasonable Prices
FREEMAN'S
DINING
ROOM
Clean, cool and with _-
excellent service.
Only one block north from
Hill Auditorium.
slltttltll1111tI nltll ulI I mEt111111ttlt

1'

also

Cooler, Cleaner, Tastier Cooking

I

ELECTROCHEF

ELECTRIC

RANGE

This electric range is fast and economical in operation, and is a high-
quality stove, extremely well-built throughout. All-white porcelain enamel
finish, with metal parts of mirror-like Chromeplate, the ELECTROCHEF
represents unusual value at the price for which it sells. The ELECTROCHEF

I-

uses focused radiant heat.

Polished reflectors on the cooking table

Dayton whip-steel SPEED

I

gives

you the jump

Look at the lines of a Dayton
Steel:Racquet. It's built like an
airplane, built for speed. The
frame is shaped like a strut, thin
edge to the wind. The steel
strings are like guy wires-less
than half the thickness of gut,
much stronger, more springy.
The wind resistance of a Day-
ton Steel Racquet, measured in
the wind tunnel of an airplane
laboratory, was 48% lower than

on faster players
that of standard wood-and-gut
racquets.
That extra energy is imparted
to the ball, and gets it there
faster, 20% faster. And that
extra 20% gives you the jump
on speedier players.
In impartial scientific tests, the
Dayton comes out ahead in the
laboratory, just as it does in prac-
tical tests on the courts. Dayton
Steel Racquet Co., Dayton, Ohio.

direct all the heat on the utensils, making for low cooking cost. Double
air-space oven insulation assures cool cooking. There are four heaters
on the cooking table, each with three heat intensities-high, medium,
and low; and an accurate oven control assures any desired cooking
temperature up to 600 degrees, making consistent baking easy.
See the ELECTROCHEF at any Detroit Edison Office ,u

DETROIT EDISON

0
DAYTON S ERACQUET

6

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